An Amazing Day I Could Never Have Imagined.

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The Patriot Guard Riders are not your average bunch. What you see on the surface (in videos and social media posts) is frost on the tip of the iceberg…to understand the depth of these people, you must first attend a PGR mission. Though I had joined months ago and with the best of intentions, I had not actually participated in a mission until today, the day I wrote this. I made excuses. The missions were 90-120 miles away. I’m uncomfortable riding for hours on the freeway in commuter traffic on a newly purchased motorcycle. I have to work. I’m short on time. I’m not a veteran or law enforcement…just an average Joe who cannot relate to what these people have seen, done, endured. I probably won’t fit in. Yeah, I had all kinds of bovine excrement excuses.

Then I injured myself on the job and was unable to ride for months…or walk or sit or even lay down with any comfort (spinal trauma) but during my down time I thought about PGR daily. I made a promise to myself that once I was able to get back on my bike…I would make attending a PGR mission a priority. And so it went, one week after regaining my ability to walk like a human again…I rode to a local mission for the burial of a young man who had passed at the age of 26. I won’t reveal the mission location or the family’s name out of respect for their privacy, but this military family has a number of members buried at the cemetery we traveled to and this young man was being laid to rest with the others who had served and passed.

I thought I knew what to expect, I didn’t. I thought I knew what to do, I didn’t. I thought I could handle it with ease, I didn’t. I was right about one thing, being in the presence of the Patriot Guard Riders did make me feel uncomfortable at first. These were men who had seen, done and survived things the rest of us “civilians” are incapable of imagining. Most were vets, some were also law enforcement who had previously served in the military, a few were like me, average guys. Being in the company of these real men made me question myself, who was I to think I could fit in with heroes? I felt a bit stupid in my brand-new riding vest and flags that had never seen daylight before. I was the FNG, someone who has never been tested in battle, who never “served” in any capacity. I was merely a beneficiary of the lives of these men and women, of the sacrifices they had made.

Then the time came and six PGR guys (clearly in their retirement years) donned white gloves, removed the casket and carried the young Army soldier to his burial site. I stood in line holding a flag and witnessed a carefully orchestrated act of reverence. Suddenly a bunch of bikers in jeans and leather vests became something else, something that transcended the average folks. They became the heart & soul of a grateful nation and each one KNEW PERSONALLY what the family was feeling. As the mother spoke beautifully moving words of strength and love, the gravesite was blanketed in a deep and genuine empathy. We were one. As I listened to the words I found myself staring at the casket, unable to imagine being able to speak eloquently had my own child been inside it. The fortitude required to do what this mother was doing seemed unattainable. My composure was truly tested and three times I tried to wipe my welling eyes without being noticed. I felt honored to be here. I was surrounded by people who lived to serve, people who put the welfare of others first. People who acted for the greater good. People who understood loss in a way most can’t. I have attended funerals…this was different. This had a deeper meaning. This mattered.

Afterwards the family invited everyone to lunch which is not a normal thing but this military family convinced everyone to go and I didn’t wanna be the sole holdout, how would that look? Unlike most of these Patriot Guard Riders, I had a job to get back to. I’m not retired. But after the ceremony I felt an odd tie to these folks and went along. And that’s when I began learning. I listened as I sat with this bunch and their stories were amazing. Who jumps on a bike and rides across the country to Arlington? Turns out, a surprising number of people do. But what was really stunning to me after such a deep and moving ceremony was the irreverent banter that ensued at the restaurant. OMG! These guys were razzing the crap out of each other and I watched as the mood transformed from reverence and empathy to joy and appreciation. They celebrated the young man’s life. There was laughter and joking and I watched as once again, they all became one. And that I could never have predicted. And as I listened to the banter, watched the family engage with the Riders and just sorta absorbed the entire scene…I realized something. I wasn’t the odd man out. I no longer felt "outside the group” or somehow lacking. I had somehow magically become one of them. I felt it. I was honored to be a part of this event and with the Patriot Guard Riders…there’s only one prequalification. Showing up. Once you’re there the rest takes care of itself. I shoulda done this ages ago.

I left this mission filled with a profound gratitude. I have been blessed in my life. I hung out with a class of people I admire and appreciate to my core. All the little things that bothered me yesterday don’t today and won’t tomorrow. I came away from this PGR mission feeling much more optimistic, grateful and well…just better. I am looking at the 1st mission dog tag the Ride Captain gave me, the blue wristband given to me by the mother to honor her son, and the printed memorial proudly proclaiming the “Celebration of Life” of the fallen young man. These simple things washed away the minutia of my day-to-day life and brought the important things of life into clear focus. I urge every person, regardless whether you’re connected to the military or first responders or ride a motorcycle or not…join the Patriot Guard Riders and show up once. Go in your car or truck, go when times are hard, go when you are filled with hesitation like I was. It’s your opportunity to surround yourself with good. The kind that changes you for the better. Don’t worry about whether you’ll fit in…just show up. Like all the important things in life…being present is all that matters.

These Patriot Guard Riders…they have the kind of friendships most do not. A lot of us civilians have plenty of fair weather friends, they’ll join you for Happy Hour or a party but won’t be available to help you paint or move. Facebook friends are tiny points of light on your monitor. These people have friends that matter, that are there for one another. Real friendships. The reliable kind. The kind that make a difference in your quality of life. It’s there, you can see it. you may even envy it a bit. I’m hoping a little of that rubs off on me. Today, during my first mission, I think I got a good start. Join PGR. Not because they have more missions than people to attend. Do it for yourself, so you can feel the empathy, the reverence, the joy and the appreciation. All you need is some denim, leather and respect. Trust me, you’ll be very glad you did. Just show up. You’ll leave with a much better outlook. Thank you all! God Bless the Patriot Guard Riders and watch over them.

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W54/XM-388

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    Being in the company of these real men made me question myself,

    Perhaps a little less gushing worship, might make it easier to get through your story?
    If you like to worship the military and police that's all fine and good for you, whatever makes you happy.

    If you don't think of yourself as a "real man", that's unfortunate.

    Do what you enjoy and what makes you happy. Don't let anyone tell you that you have to do some specific occupation or specific experience to be a "real man". Just be yourself and be strong, independent and confident.
     

    308pirate

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    Perhaps a little less gushing worship, might make it easier to get through your story?
    If you like to worship the military and police that's all fine and good for you, whatever makes you happy.

    If you don't think of yourself as a "real man", that's unfortunate.

    Do what you enjoy and what makes you happy. Don't let anyone tell you that you have to do some specific occupation or specific experience to be a "real man". Just be yourself and be strong, independent and confident.

    Heard around here you need one of these to be a real man
    R.0e8d90684011e69dc09e10f79364d736
     

    W54/XM-388

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    You ride a motorcycle. In the US. On roads with cars, teenage girls, and cell phones.

    After a few thousand more miles you will long for the safety of an FOB somewhere.

    Yep.
    One of my brothers did a tour in Iraq including doing convoy escort duty, no injuries.
    Came home, got on a motorcycle and crashed (minor injuries).
     
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    Maggot

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    Yep.
    One of my brothers did a tour in Iraq including doing convoy escort duty, no injuries.
    Came home, got on a motorcycle and crashed (minor injuries).
    Thats why I quit and sold mine years ago. I could deal with the scooter but not the idiots in cars (and trucks). Sold it wrecked.
     
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    We buried this man today.

    LCDR Brian C. Crump, 46, USN(AD), Iraq, National City- MNC, 19 May 2022 (Read 173 times)​

    Gil Zaragoza

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    LCDR Brian C. Crump, 46, USN(AD), Iraq, National City- MNC, 19 May 2022

    « on: May 14, 2022, 04:54:08 AM »

    The family of Brian Catayong Crump has invited the Patriot Guard Riders to be present to honor their Hero for his service to his country. It will be our privilege to do so.

    Brian was born in Olongapo City, Philippines, on 15 November 1975 and entered Eternal Rest on 14 April 2022 in Sasebo, Japan.
    Brian lived in Olongapo until the age of seven. In 1982 along with his parents, he moved to San Diego on his father’s Navy orders. He attended Samuel F.B. Morse High School, where he competed in Cross Country and Track and Field, graduating in 1994.

    Brian enlisted in the Navy in 1997. After graduation from ”A” school, he was assigned to Ordinance Disposal Unit TWO(EOD MU2) in Little Creek, Virginia. In 1998 he attended the Law Enforcement Apprentice Course at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, and was assigned to Fleet Activities Sasebo in Sasebo City, Japan. Brian was in Sasebo from 1999 to 2003, where he was promoted to Operations Specialist Second Class and converted to Master-at-Arms rating. From 2007 to 2010, Brian was attached to NCIS Security Training, San Diego. While in San Diego, he advanced to Chief Petty Officer in 2008 and was commissioned under the Limited Duty Officer program, Designator 6490 Security Officer in 2010. In December 2010, he served as the Installation Security Officer and Antiterrorism Officer in Souda Bay, Crete. In 2012 he served as the Security Officer at NCIS STAAT Pacific, Far East Detachment in Yokosuka, Japan. Brian served aboard the USS Boxer (LHD4), homeported in San Diego. His last duty station was aboard the USS America (LHA6) as the Security Officer, Amphibious Squadron ELEVEN, homeported in Sasebo. His awards/citations included the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (7 awards), Joint Service Achievement Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (4 awards), Iraq Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, NATO Service Medal, and other unit and service awards.

    While stationed in Sasebo, Japan, Brian met the love of his life, Kana Adachi, and tied the knot in Las Vegas in 2003. The following year they had a second ceremony in Sasebo. After various assignments that included Guam and San Diego, Brian was back in Sasebo in 2017.

    Brian is survived by his wife Kana, his daughter Nanami and son Taiyo. He also leaves behind his parents Alan and Marina, and his brother Marlon.

    NOTE: This mission posting facilitates your voluntary participation in honoring this Military Veteran. For those interested, and all PGR members are welcome, we will be accompanying the Hero and his family from the mortuary to his final resting place. Please see the timetable if you would like to participate. We will meet you there for those who would rather go directly to the cemetery.

    NOTE: Please observe the latest “COVID-19” restrictions.

    Time Table for Thursday 19 May 2022

    0700 – Stage at California Cremation and Burial, 2200 Highland Ave., National City https://goo.gl/maps/q6GMG88mYcy3A4Zk8

    0730 – Mission Briefing

    0745 – KSU Miramar National Cemetery, 5795 Nobel Dr., San Diego http://goo.gl/maps/rAfUs

    0845 – Estimated arrival at Miramar National Cemetery

    0900 – Flag Line, Funeral Service with Full Military Honors

    You do not have to be a Veteran or a motorcycle rider to attend this mission. All PGR members are welcome. We encourage those who do not ride to attend in your car. If this is your first mission, go to the initial staging area, and you will be briefed by the R/C (Ride Captain). Dress for motorcycle riding or wear casual attire if you are driving a cage (car). Please feel free to attend any portion of this mission you can. Please ride/drive safely.

    Remember that our mission is to stand tall and silent with honor and respect for our Heroes—no talking, smoking, or cell phone use during the flag line or service. Please keep radios off and engine noise to a minimum. Observe the 15 MPH speed limit. Remember, cemeteries are hallowed ground. Show respect to all who are there, not just the ones we honor.

    QpI6Xzv.jpg
    Men like this make some of you man-bun sporting smartass posters sound like immature manginas, unworthy of PGR membership. Stay home and type sarcasm and BS on the internet...it's your forte'. The families of men like this deserve the respect & support of us adults and patriotic children, you don't.
     

    Maggot

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    RIP, sir.

    The boys were pretty rough on ya, I must admit you were a bit over the top, we're all, or most of us are, good men, and you shouldnt put yourself down.

    I do understand. I felt about the same after attending the interment of an old friend at Arlington, and watching the guards at the Tomb of the Unknowns.

    Very humbling, thanks for sharing.
     

    stefan73

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    Patriot Guard covered my friends funeral and helped prevent the Westboro morons from impacting his funeral after he was killed in Iraq. I have nothing but good things to say about them for that!

    OP: I've done ramp ceremonies, memorial services for friends and fellow Soldiers, carried my very first new privates casket (I was his PLT LDR, after we had PCS'd he deployed and was killed after rescuing two other Soldiers while trying to save the third, my old squad leader called me and asked that I attend his funeral in Jim Thorpe PA) and placed it on the caisson. It never gets any easier loosing a Soldier or attending a service.

    V/R
     
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    The King

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    “Men like this make some of you man-bun sporting smartass posters sound like immature manginas, unworthy of PGR membership. Stay home and type sarcasm and BS on the internet...it's your forte'. The families of men like this deserve the respect & support of us adults and patriotic children, you don't.”

    If you think you are having a mental health crisis, please dial 911. This forum does not construe medical advice.

    That said - I have nothing whatsoever to say against LCDR Crump. Nor are any of my comments direct at or towards him.

    My comment about the dangers of riding motorcycles were directed at your choice of entertainment.

    I will also add that never having been in the service in no way makes a great man any less great, and it in no way makes a mediocre man any more great.

    The truth is the whole spectrum of humanity is there and you get the same sort of things you get everywhere else. There is the genius general over there fighting the war in his head all day and the political hack over there sucking up the defense contractor bribes and selling out his country.

    I have found most towns just off post to be great places for a slung assault rifle instead of just a concealed piece, and nobody is gonna run you over faster or more ignorantly than the dickhead driving his Dodge Charger out of Gate 4 here at Carson.
     

    stefan73

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    “Men like this make some of you man-bun sporting smartass posters sound like immature manginas, unworthy of PGR membership. Stay home and type sarcasm and BS on the internet...it's your forte'. The families of men like this deserve the respect & support of us adults and patriotic children, you don't.”

    If you think you are having a mental health crisis, please dial 911. This forum does not construe medical advice.

    That said - I have nothing whatsoever to say against LCDR Crump. Nor are any of my comments direct at or towards him.

    My comment about the dangers of riding motorcycles were directed at your choice of entertainment.

    I will also add that never having been in the service in no way makes a great man any less great, and it in no way makes a mediocre man any more great.

    The truth is the whole spectrum of humanity is there and you get the same sort of things you get everywhere else. There is the genius general over there fighting the war in his head all day and the political hack over there sucking up the defense contractor bribes and selling out his country.

    I have found most towns just off post to be great places for a slung assault rifle instead of just a concealed piece, and nobody is gonna run you over faster or more ignorantly than the dickhead driving his Dodge Charger out of Gate 4 here at Carson.
    That dickhead with his Dodge Charger is probably a private paying 46% interest on it:LOL::LOL:

    On a more serious note and to pile on some of what you wrote.

    I agree with your statement, "I will also add that never having been in the service in no way makes a great man any less great, and it in no way makes a mediocre man any more great.".

    People are just people, some great and some not. Conflict gives you the opportunity to see the best and worst in people in a radically compressed timeframe. You can see it at home but it is more readily visible in conflict. You see some horrific stuff at home and you see some horrific stuff in theater (I think you see it on a larger scale in theater in a shorter period of time). It's what you make and do with that. I've seen Soldiers freeze, I've had a Soldier refuse to get on the gun because as he said "I ain't going to die for my country, I ain't no hero" (I submitted him for UCMJ, I wanted to shoot him for cowardice but I think my chain of command would have frowned on that one:cautious:). I had a Soldier crying out of frustration while dumping rounds out of the 240B because he wasn't able to elevate the gun high enough to hit the guys on the roof tops around us that were engaging us in Baghdad. I've seen guys plugging their ears going out the gate because EFP's were placed on a prior day about 150 yards from our gate and wiped out a MiTT, my guys had to pick what was left of them up. I saw a Platoon Sargent that was shot and refused to be evacuated until they were complete with their mission and all his Soldiers were back on the COP, the medics that helped pick up the pieces and treat people after the 4 May 06 suicide bombing in Baghdad, the Soldiers that placed themselves in the line of fire between terrorists and civilians to protect the civilians that were being shot at, the Soldier that steps into the road and engages a vehicle borne IED and stops it only to suffer severe injuries, the Soldier that gets into a vehicle fully knowing this might be their last patrol and keeps his/her head up and does their job. You get all types and everybody's reaction to a fight, loss, fear, adrenaline and the adrenaline crash is different. Some people can overcome their fear, some can't, some can overcome their loss and some can't, some can inflict pain and some can't, some can turn it on and turn it off and some can't. There are some crazy dynamics in conflict. I think that conflict affords the unassuming man or woman the ability to display their courage more readily, look at history, look what Corporal Doss did at Hacksaw Ridge, or Audie Murphy who was 5'5" and 137lbs. You learn a lot the hard way, you learn a lot about your Soldiers and yourself. So, people are just people, no one is perfect and everyone wants to be the hero.

    Sorry for the rambling, it's not something I try to think about much or have dwelled on much. But, probably a good conversation/discussion to have.

    My .02
     
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    The King

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    That dickhead with his Dodge Charger is probably a private paying 46% interest on it:LOL::LOL:

    On a more serious note and to pile on some of what you wrote.

    I agree with your statement, "I will also add that never having been in the service in no way makes a great man any less great, and it in no way makes a mediocre man any more great.".

    People are just people, some great and some not. Conflict gives you the opportunity to see the best and worst in people in a radically compressed timeframe. You can see it at home but it is more readily visible in conflict. You see some horrific stuff at home and you see some horrific stuff in theater (I think you see it on a larger scale in theater in a shorter period of time). It's what you make and do with that. I've seen Soldiers freeze, I've had a Soldier refuse to get on the gun because as he said "I ain't going to die for my country, I ain't no hero" (I submitted him for UCMJ, I wanted to shoot him for cowardice but I think my chain of command would have frowned on that one:cautious:). I had a Soldier crying out of frustration while dumping rounds out of the 240B because he wasn't able to elevate the gun high enough to hit the guys on the roof tops around us that were engaging us in Baghdad. I've seen guys plugging their ears going out the gate because EFP's were placed on a prior day about 150 yards from our gate and wiped out a MiTT, my guys had to pick what was left of them up. I saw a Platoon Sargent that was shot and refused to be evacuated until they were complete with their mission and all his Soldiers were back on the COP, the medics that helped pick up the pieces and treat people after the 4 May 06 suicide bombing in Baghdad, the Soldiers that placed themselves in the line of fire between terrorists and civilians to protect the civilians that were being shot at, the Soldier that steps into the road and engages a vehicle borne IED and stops it only to suffer severe injuries, the Soldier that gets into a vehicle fully knowing this might be their last patrol and keeps his/her head up and does their job. You get all types and everybody's reaction to a fight, loss, fear, adrenaline and the adrenaline crash is different. Some people can overcome their fear, some can't, some can overcome their loss and some can't, some can inflict pain and some can't, some can turn it on and turn it off and some can't. There are some crazy dynamics in conflict. I think that conflict affords the unassuming man or woman the ability to display their courage more readily, look at history, look what Corporal Doss did at Hacksaw Ridge, or Audie Murphy who was 5'5" and 137lbs. You learn a lot the hard way, you learn a lot about your Soldiers and yourself. So, people are just people, no one is perfect and everyone wants to be the hero.

    Sorry for the rambling, it's not something I try to think about much or have dwelled on much. But, probably a good conversation/discussion to have.

    My .02

    That was very well put.

    I am also going to say that I have run into some people who used to be nailed down 100% and had come undone over time. You never know what you are gonna see or have happen that was just the last straw.

    For example, as I get older and start really turning grey my PTSD is worse than it was. More controlling not less. Just means I keep certain things off the menu of shit to do each day, but I do notice. What that comes down to is if you knew my particular hangup you could probably engineer a situation where I wasn't in problem-solving mode anymore...

    And oddly there is a pretty solid cache of dudes (and a few gals) I would trust to man a checkpoint with me that I wouldn't let watch my kids...or change the oil on my car.

    Like I said - all sorts of folks.
     

    stefan73

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    I've seen some that became undone and eventually found their way, some sadly never did. I still worry and wonder about a few of my former Soldiers. One turned 18 right before deploying, he was self destructive and put himself into the vertical tail spin of self doubt following some engagements. I tried to help, tried to be empathetic but it was hard for me, I had challenges relating and tried to ensure that he understood that the actions we took in the fights we were in were right/just/moral and protecting innocents. He didn't listen and stayed on his self destructive path for a while. Multiple suicide attempts, failed relationships and eventually something happened, he found someone that was able to help and now he is happy with a wife and children.
    I had another Soldier that I wonder what happened to him and worry. Great kid, great Soldier who gave you his heart. He was much more sensitive than I knew and when I realized it, it was too late, the damage was done. Last time I saw him was after he had PCS'd to FT Hood and was getting out of the Army, he was very angry but glad to see me and I him. I hope that he is doing ok and that I can track him down.

    I lost some good guys to their demons and some good guys to war. Always sucks to start talking about a friend and have someone say "I know that guy, he's dead". That's happened to me a few times and it sucks to find out that way.

    It's amazing how fond you become of Soldiers. I loved my Soldiers like they were my own children, and I would hope that if my children served that their leaders would love them and treat them just as good (train them hard and work their hardest to prepare them for the task at hand).

    On a more upbeat note, I had Soldiers that if you could leave them deployed they would be great, but back in garrison they were terrible. Some of the dumb shit they did! Of course I wasn't perfect either, my battalion had a safety brief because of me and everyone was banned from riding motorcycles with me😁

    All sorts,
     

    JR_PRO77

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    That dickhead with his Dodge Charger is probably a private paying 46% interest on it:LOL::LOL:

    On a more serious note and to pile on some of what you wrote.

    I agree with your statement, "I will also add that never having been in the service in no way makes a great man any less great, and it in no way makes a mediocre man any more great.".

    People are just people, some great and some not. Conflict gives you the opportunity to see the best and worst in people in a radically compressed timeframe. You can see it at home but it is more readily visible in conflict. You see some horrific stuff at home and you see some horrific stuff in theater (I think you see it on a larger scale in theater in a shorter period of time). It's what you make and do with that. I've seen Soldiers freeze, I've had a Soldier refuse to get on the gun because as he said "I ain't going to die for my country, I ain't no hero" (I submitted him for UCMJ, I wanted to shoot him for cowardice but I think my chain of command would have frowned on that one:cautious:). I had a Soldier crying out of frustration while dumping rounds out of the 240B because he wasn't able to elevate the gun high enough to hit the guys on the roof tops around us that were engaging us in Baghdad. I've seen guys plugging their ears going out the gate because EFP's were placed on a prior day about 150 yards from our gate and wiped out a MiTT, my guys had to pick what was left of them up. I saw a Platoon Sargent that was shot and refused to be evacuated until they were complete with their mission and all his Soldiers were back on the COP, the medics that helped pick up the pieces and treat people after the 4 May 06 suicide bombing in Baghdad, the Soldiers that placed themselves in the line of fire between terrorists and civilians to protect the civilians that were being shot at, the Soldier that steps into the road and engages a vehicle borne IED and stops it only to suffer severe injuries, the Soldier that gets into a vehicle fully knowing this might be their last patrol and keeps his/her head up and does their job. You get all types and everybody's reaction to a fight, loss, fear, adrenaline and the adrenaline crash is different. Some people can overcome their fear, some can't, some can overcome their loss and some can't, some can inflict pain and some can't, some can turn it on and turn it off and some can't. There are some crazy dynamics in conflict. I think that conflict affords the unassuming man or woman the ability to display their courage more readily, look at history, look what Corporal Doss did at Hacksaw Ridge, or Audie Murphy who was 5'5" and 137lbs. You learn a lot the hard way, you learn a lot about your Soldiers and yourself. So, people are just people, no one is perfect and everyone wants to be the hero.

    Sorry for the rambling, it's not something I try to think about much or have dwelled on much. But, probably a good conversation/discussion to have.

    My .02
    Great stories I love to hear them. Every time I read stories like this is it just reinforces that even if you train hard, have a great support system, and awesome family/teammates around, you never know with 100% certainty how people are going to react when the SHTF. And thats true for both adults and kids alike.
     
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    Maggot

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    I've seen some that became undone and eventually found their way, some sadly never did. I still worry and wonder about a few of my former Soldiers. One turned 18 right before deploying, he was self destructive and put himself into the vertical tail spin of self doubt following some engagements. I tried to help, tried to be empathetic but it was hard for me, I had challenges relating and tried to ensure that he understood that the actions we took in the fights we were in were right/just/moral and protecting innocents. He didn't listen and stayed on his self destructive path for a while. Multiple suicide attempts, failed relationships and eventually something happened, he found someone that was able to help and now he is happy with a wife and children.
    I had another Soldier that I wonder what happened to him and worry. Great kid, great Soldier who gave you his heart. He was much more sensitive than I knew and when I realized it, it was too late, the damage was done. Last time I saw him was after he had PCS'd to FT Hood and was getting out of the Army, he was very angry but glad to see me and I him. I hope that he is doing ok and that I can track him down.

    I lost some good guys to their demons and some good guys to war. Always sucks to start talking about a friend and have someone say "I know that guy, he's dead". That's happened to me a few times and it sucks to find out that way.

    It's amazing how fond you become of Soldiers. I loved my Soldiers like they were my own children, and I would hope that if my children served that their leaders would love them and treat them just as good (train them hard and work their hardest to prepare them for the task at hand).

    On a more upbeat note, I had Soldiers that if you could leave them deployed they would be great, but back in garrison they were terrible. Some of the dumb shit they did! Of course I wasn't perfect either, my battalion had a safety brief because of me and everyone was banned from riding motorcycles with me😁

    All sorts,
    Great write up, thanks. This and your post above made me think of the two Marines who stood when the truck turned the corner....Semper Fidelis, RIP.

     
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    stefan73

    Sergeant
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  • Mar 6, 2006
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    What an amazing speech, remembrance, I wouldn't have held it together as well as he did.

    I made friends with a Marine Corps SPiTT. Phenomenal guys, their team leader always carried a big Randal knife and always told me I needed one. He was mad that he missed the big firefight I got into (I have a funny story about that). I traded 2,000 rounds of 7.62X39 for a Romanian PSL with optic, extra mags, some ammunition and a Blackhawk drag bag. I still have the drag bag and use it regularly. They were later moved down south, I had heard that they got hit going down south and hit pretty bad, I hope that was an incorrect report but who knows. All the guys on that team were first class guys and I really liked them! I still look at Randal knives on occasion and think of them when I listen to the Guy Clark song "Randal Knife".

    They made a memorial video from that deployment for 1-25. It was a rough deployment. Napier was executed by an Afghani in a green on blue incident and two other Soldiers were wounded and all were flown to FOB Lagman, Qalat and later Kandahar after they were stabilized. I remember the FLA arriving with the casualties and the nurses trying to take one of the Soldiers out and he pushed them off and screamed "help my friend, he's been shot" (he had also been shot). That was a hard day. https://www.sentinel-echo.com/news/...cle_cd9d4841-d346-5f62-a5db-a252075a29e0.html

    There are a lot more stories, but that is from spending the better part of my life in the military.


    You see the best and worst.
     
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    D

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    Thanks for those stories and video. Most of the Patriot Guard Riders are Vietnam Vets, at age 62 I am one of the younger Riders, not yet retired. On each mission I listen to their stories and amazed by how casually they refer to time spent in Helll as "a hard day." The families of the fallen appreciate the line of bikes escorting their loved one to his/her final resting place and for those dealing with PTSD you might find comfort attending a PGR mission. The people I meet through PGR are a far better grade of human beings than most. iIt's something that cannot be described, you must attend a mission and experience it. My last mission I attended in my truck because it was far away with rain and wind. You don't need to ride a motorcycle to participate. You just need to recognize the pain from loss our military families (and those of first responders) are facing.
     
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    308pirate

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Apr 25, 2017
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    Men like this make some of you man-bun sporting smartass posters sound like immature manginas, unworthy of PGR membership. Stay home and type sarcasm and BS on the internet...it's your forte'. The families of men like this deserve the respect & support of us adults and patriotic children, you don't.

    What you do is admirable.

    However, before your run your mouth any more, several of the man-bun sporting smartass posters on this thread are military veterans.