DIY building????

pineoak

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Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 15, 2017
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North Carolina
+1 on .223 as a caliber if the longest you have access to practice is 300 yards; .22LR if you're on a budget

+1 the Snipershide training here on this site... $20 is an absolute bargain for the knowledge you can glean

Scope brands are like cars. There are better Fords and bad Toyotas. The model matters. Use the search function with any ?s and you'll have tons of reading to do. For 300 yards on a budget, this is the one I'd suggest personally:


Your sniper friend should be able to help you out with selection of rifle/caliber/scope as well.

If he'll let you shoot one of his rifles, that is THE way to go. My friends use my .22LR, 9mm pistols, & .223 rifles and don't pay for ammo their first 3 trips. Give you a chance to try before you buy.
 

marksman556

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Sep 1, 2014
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I am a David. I am from Saskatchewan Canada. I have a Chinese SKS, mossberg 835, .308 savage Axis, & mossberg .22 semi.

Been into guns forever. But bought my my first firearm @ 37.
I will stop you right there in your track... The 408 Cheytac is prohibited in Canada since the OIC (order in council) that banned more than 1500 variant of rifles in Canada in mai 2020.

The next best caliber under 10000 joules of energy you will be allowed to use is the 375 ENABLR.

GOOD LUCK.
 
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marksman556

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Sep 1, 2014
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Yes I am very sure

my friend is a ppcli sniper. He recommended this as the best
I'm sorry but your ppcli friend doesn't know anything about guns policies in Canada. It is allowed for the Canadian Army but is not for private owners/canadian citizens
 

AB Shooter

Private
Minuteman
Jun 2, 2022
6
1
Alberta Cdn
Your expectations are a bit unrealistic given your current level of experience and the actual realities of shooting the distances you mention.

Make life easy on yourself.

Do all the research and build yourself something in .300 Norma Magnum.
Then learn how to shoot it to the limits of the ability of that cartridge.
And by learn how to shoot it, I don't mean you send 50 rounds downrange and are happy if a handful hit.
I mean learn it to where you expect that from your first shot to your last shot, you have a better than even chance of being on target unless a wind call or wind change messes you up.
You'll be able to probably get to 2000+ meters before you start to find that you have to go bigger.

Once you have gone that far, you'll have enough understanding to jump to the next level.
By then if you do some reading, you might decide to skip the .408CT all together and instead go with something in the .375 or .416 range.

Assuming you are actually legit and serious, trying to jump from what you have now to wanting to build your own .408CT and hit targets 5000 meters away is going to be a road full of much frustration, failure and expense.
I 2nd this. I'm a stubble jumper living in Alberta. Learning to shoot more then 300 meters in Saskatchewan is easy on a calm day, but on a windy day, where you can still see your dog running away after 2 days, you have to learn how to read the wind... A 300 Norma is too much gun. Start off soft and go with a good Tikka Varmint 6.5 CM or a 308. Put it in a good chassis and your good to go.
 

Leatherman1973

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Minuteman
Aug 10, 2022
27
13
Saskatchewan
I 2nd this. I'm a stubble jumper living in Alberta. Learning to shoot more then 300 meters in Saskatchewan is easy on a calm day, but on a windy day, where you can still see your dog running away after 2 days, you have to learn how to read the wind... A 300 Norma is too much gun. Start off soft and go with a good Tikka Varmint 6.5 CM or a 308. Put it in a good chassis and your good to go.
That is the general consensus. Thank you