Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

TNT

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Just starting to look at riding bikes as a hobby and preferred mode of transportation. I have 0 experience beyond the Navy BRC and I'm looking at getting a GSXR-600 (guy is giving me a good deal - or at least what I consider to be a good deal - on a used one). Ok, I know. I am an idiot. Moving on from that, I'm looking for some info from those in the know.

In particular, size is a concern. I have a sore groin from two days of riding a training bike that was too tall for me. Do these things come in many different sizes, or is it more an adjustable one-size-fits-most?

I plan to ride around in the Pentagon parking lot with some training cones on the weekends (provided those loonies from the not-so-past haven't shut the place down to civilian traffic for good) for about a month before even considering taking it out on the street. Beltway is strictly forbidden - I'm stupid, but not that stupid. Knowing that it's a lot of power and I'll probably end up dropping it in said parking lot and falling a couple of times, I have heard of some trainer pegs to attach to the bike to mitigate severe damage on small impacts. Consistent with this understanding of me eating pavement most likely, what kind of PPE is recommended. I am sorely tempted to try and armor up like the Michelin Man, but realize that there are some good pants/jackets/boots/helmets out there that may actually offer me some real protection that I should be aware of.

Also, any specific reference material I should read up on for maintenance and whatnot would be appreciated.

Ok...flame on.
 

padronanniversary

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Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

dainese leathers . I prefer helimot leathers, as they are hand made to your body. When I was out in Cali had a few leathers suites nad jackets made up with gloves. The gloves are by far the best.

And get good helmet.

Between that and my side boots, I have totaled a bike and thanks be to God, walked away from a few bike totals. I can't stress enough good equipment, as I only had bruised ribs. My equipment was all dinged and scratched up, helmet had a gouge in it. Proper fit is key too. If you going 80 and lay it down, you better hope your johney rocket synthetic does not melt through, else you will not have skin on your ass lol
 

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: TNT</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Just starting to look at riding bikes as a hobby and preferred mode of transportation. I have 0 experience beyond the Navy BRC and I'm looking at getting a GSXR-600 (guy is giving me a good deal - or at least what I consider to be a good deal - on a used one). <span style="font-size: 14pt"> <span style="color: #CC0000">Ok, I know. I am an idiot. </span> </span> Moving on from that, I'm looking for some info from those in the know.

    In particular, size is a concern. I have a sore groin from two days of riding a training bike that was too tall for me. Do these things come in many different sizes, or is it more an adjustable one-size-fits-most?

    I plan to ride around in the Pentagon parking lot with some training cones on the weekends (provided those loonies from the not-so-past haven't shut the place down to civilian traffic for good) for about a month before even considering taking it out on the street. Beltway is strictly forbidden - I'm stupid, but not that stupid. Knowing that it's a lot of power and I'll probably end up dropping it in said parking lot and falling a couple of times, I have heard of some trainer pegs to attach to the bike to mitigate severe damage on small impacts. Consistent with this understanding of me eating pavement most likely, what kind of PPE is recommended. I am sorely tempted to try and armor up like the Michelin Man, but realize that there are some good pants/jackets/boots/helmets out there that may actually offer me some real protection that I should be aware of.

    Also, any specific reference material I should read up on for maintenance and whatnot would be appreciated.

    Ok...flame on. </div></div>

    Enough said.
    laugh.gif
     

    sunburned

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Get a beater dirt bike first and learn bike control as you fall in the dirt. More forgiving than pavement, and you aren't trying to learn bike control and traffic survival at the same time. You will also have a much better idea of what you want in a street bike. Helmet, boots and gloves first, and learn to ride covering the front brake with a finger or two.
    I've walked away from a few crashes because of good gear. The old Bell Helmet ad said "If you've got a 10 dollar head, get a 10 dollar helmet."
     

    rrflyer

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    gxsr is a quintessential squid bike!


    they aren't really adjustable...you can get some springs to lower them but it reduces suspension travel and handling.

    (they are adjustable for handling and spring rate setups for track use but not for riding height etc..)

    I always always always wore at least

    Full Helmet,
    Leather Jacket
    Gloves
    Boots --- Riding boots not stupid timberlands.

    If it was gonna be a full day ride I'd usually put on
    leather pants as well.

    I really liked my Alpinestars leathers and Arai helmets.'


    Be careful and do a self assessment every once in a while and see if you catch yourself doing stupid crap its time to park it for a while. I sold mine after catching myself doing stupid crap......


     

    TNT

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Any ideas on where to ride a dirt bike around Arlington, VA?

    I'm thinking I'm ok with DOT/Snell approved helmets, but not sure on particular brands/styles. I know from other sports that some that meet requirements are better than others that meet the same requirements just by design (e.g., geometry), depending on the way one strikes his dome.

    Don't want to try street survival in NOVA before I can comfortably maneuver the bike, hence the giant north parking lot (got hundreds of yards and ready painted lines). To be honest, drivers around here are still a significant threat when I'm in my truck, and I understand a bike is a pays your money, takes your chances sort of deal, so actual street riding is quite a ways off.

    Is any of that kevlar stuff good, or is leather the way to go?
     

    Graham

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Modern 600s are no longer beginner bikes: They put out upwards of 100 horsepower at the rear wheel and you can easily pitch yourself off on the throttle alone. That said, most modern sportbikes are very civilized on part throttle, so they are easy to learn-on.

    If it was me (and it is), get an Aerostich suit:

    http://www.aerostich.com/aerostich-suits

    Helimot gloves:

    http://www.helimot.com/shopglovesdisplayproducts.asp?id=23&cat=Gloves

    and if you have an oval head spend the money on an Arai full-face helmet.

     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: TNT</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> <span style="color: #3366FF">Any ideas on where to ride a dirt bike around Arlington, VA?</span>

    I'm thinking I'm ok with DOT/Snell approved helmets, but not sure on particular brands/styles. I know from other sports that some that meet requirements are better than others that meet the same requirements just by design (e.g., geometry), depending on the way one strikes his dome.

    Don't want to try street survival in NOVA before I can comfortably maneuver the bike, hence the giant north parking lot (got hundreds of yards and ready painted lines). To be honest, drivers around here are still a significant threat when I'm in my truck, and I understand a bike is a pays your money, takes your chances sort of deal, so actual street riding is quite a ways off.

    Is any of that kevlar stuff good, or is leather the way to go?
    </div></div>

    <span style="color: #3366FF"> Torget that and take a trip to the country...Lots of good roads around here...Charlottesville.</span>

    Here is one of the most valuable tips I learned from a friend....."Your right hand is directly linked to your dick. The harder you turn the throttle the stiffer your dick gets which feeds back to the right hand which feeds back to the dick...and so on." In other words the faster you go the cooler it feels so you go even faster which feels even cooler so you go faster which feels cooler.....
    crazy.gif
    .

    Hope you get the picture.
     

    idpasteve

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    take an MSF class- you'll enjoy it. If you can find
    one locally - a beginning race class ( superbike school etc)
    will teach you a TON about lean angles, braking, evading by
    steering much, much faster than you thought possible.

    + 1 on gear!!!

    steve
     

    Drifter

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts


    Yep Race bike for a first bike is really a bad idea. Kind of like learning to drive in an indy car.

    A good leather riding jacket, pants, riding boots and helmet. Or full padded leathers, I have a Cortech four season jacket, draggin jeans, and cortech riding boots along with a shoei helmet. I sold off my bike two years ago but had an 05 Honda Interceptor, nice mix of sport bike and touring rig so it was actually comfortable to ride.

    Definitely dress for a bad day, expecially where you will be riding. Everyone is in a hurry, lots of traffic and most people are not looking for bikes.

     

    opelboy

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    i learned how to ride on a small dirt bike when i was small. ive always had a motorcycle but not a crotch rocket. ive only ridden some of the big ones, no 600's- hyabusa rc51 1100nighthawk r1. they are all controllable if you learn to respect throttle control and self control. sounds like youre on the right path by riding a training bike and spending time in the parking lot. all i can add to the advice here is watch other cars cause they dont see you and people will pull out in front of you or move into your lane. enjoy yourself but dont show off it gets expensive
     

    padronanniversary

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    just remember, its a matter of if, NOT WHEN you go down. Even if its not your fault.

    Once you have a family, it takes a real MAN not to do the things he wants for the sake of the family.


    That said, enjoy riding. And if you have the need for speed, do track time. There are many track offerings that improve your skill on a safer environment. Alot of motorcycle schools that are reputable, plus you can rent bikes and get their insurance and not ruin yours. Just remember to low side, high siding a bike hurts like a mofo
     

    stefan73

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    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: PadronAniversary</div><div class="ubbcode-body">just remember, its a matter of if, NOT WHEN you go down. Even if its not your fault.

    Once you have a family, it takes a real MAN not to do the things he wants for the sake of the family.


    That said, enjoy riding. And if you have the need for speed, do track time. There are many track offerings that improve your skill on a safer environment. Alot of motorcycle schools that are reputable, plus you can rent bikes and get their insurance and not ruin yours. Just remember to low side, high siding a bike hurts like a mofo </div></div>

    Shit happens. If, if, if. If, if were candy and nuts then I'd have a bag full. It takes what to have an excuse not to do something?

    Ride within "your" limits. Remeber cold and new tires have almost no traction and will put you on your ass if you don't know what your doing ie warm up your tires well before a spirited ride. Best place to ride and learn is on a track!!! Do not feel pressure to go fast! It comes with time and experience and failure to follow this advice might land you on your ass!!
    Read the "Pace" TSBA read the PACE . Ride "your ride", find a good group of riders (not squids) to ride with. Have fun, wear all your gear, learn what you can and if it doesn't feel good or you just aren't feeling right then just don't ride!
     

    ArcticLight

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Squid bike LOL.

    I live in a Navy town, about 300 yards from a state highway and I hear them ripping from the light ALL the time...
     

    TNT

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Yep, the BRC-1 was awesome - learned a ton. Now I've got two more Uncle Sam sponsored MSF courses (exp rider and sport bike) on my list that I want to complete before I want to try street riding. Haven't looked up superbike schools around here, but if I could pass the other MSF courses and get plenty of time in a lot, you think I could attend that type of course? Still sounds a bit farther off.

    As far as trying to go rip-roaring around...
    I recognize the allure of speed, and I won't deny that I've experienced it, primarily at the hands of others (yes, a bit of humor there for Goldie). That started me jumping from airplanes in the first place, another activity not considered to be "smart" to do. But truth be told, I'm not much of an speed junkie when I'm the one at the wheel, throttle, etc. When I'm doing something technically challenging, I become focused on the task and tend to ignore emotion while I'm carrying out my plan. More speed doesn't really add to the enjoyment, it just changes the parameters that I have to adjust for. Sometimes it's a positive, sometimes a negative, but it's not something to go seek in and of itself.
     

    sr15match

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    +++ on taking a weekend course! Then ride at you're own pace to gain skills and confidence. NoVA drivers are assholes so head west over Sky Line or into W.Va at a minimum. Just because it's a 600 don't let it fool you. The latest 600's are wicked little bikes.

    A quality helmet, again quality jacket with CE rated armor but vented if possible, quality riding boots, and quality gloves.

    Go to a couple of the big stores (like Colemans as much as I hate them or MHKS in Manassas love them) and try stuff on. Good gear and equally good fit is the name of the game. Full leathers are a nice option but getting caught out in the crazy heat & humidity around there can really suck ass, trust me........... been there done that.

    Here's what I have for example:
    Arai Vector 2 helmet
    Vanson Jacket Mark 2 Sport Rider Jacket / Hein Gericke single pc suit
    Alpinestars gloves
    Dainese gloves (Ducati Corsa gloves left over from my Ducati days)
    Alpinestars boots

    Wife has:
    Soumy Spec 1R Extreme helmet
    Alpinestars, Joe Rocket, Icon jackets (different jackets for different weather & riding)
    Alpinestars gloves
    Icon gloves
    Alpinestars boots

    There is quality gear in most price ranges, just don't skimp and go el'cheapo, you get what you pay for.

    DealsGap3.jpg


    Good luck and stay safe!
     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    'theres a really nice track up around winchester, Va...could be in Maryland. Ask around...they have races on the weekends. Be Careful.
     

    Bolt_Overide

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    My personal opinion is get some sort of upright cruiser type bike first, just something cheap, and get some riding experience first, then get on the low slung, leaning over, way too god damn fast crotch rocket.
     

    Jaxdialation

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Motorcycles are uniquely stupid, as the rider is much more exposed the bad (lethal) driving of others.

    On the plus side young riders usually get killed before they have a chance to procreate and have equally stupid kids. The gene pool is thus enhanced.


    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Stefan73</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Shit happens. If, if, if. If, if were candy and nuts then I'd have a bag full. It takes what to have an excuse not to do something?
    </div></div>
     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jAXDIALATION</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Motorcycles are uniquely stupid, as the rider is much more exposed the bad (lethal) driving of others.

    On the plus side young riders usually get killed before they have a chance to procreate and have equally stupid kids. The gene pool is thus enhanced.


    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Stefan73</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Shit happens. If, if, if. If, if were candy and nuts then I'd have a bag full. It takes what to have an excuse not to do something?
    </div></div> </div></div>

    Good post but that Avatar is killer....where did you find that?
     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Lindy</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Goldie: right click on his avatar, and then copy the URL.
    </div></div>

    Thank you Lindy. I thought I remembered you as living in Tejas. Aransas Pass or Port Aransas?
     

    Lindy

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Goldie: I live in Creede during the summer, and Rockport, Texas, the rest of the year.

    I was born a Texan, and will likely die one, but that doesn't mean I have to spend the summer there.

    "If I owned Texas and Hell, I would rent out Texas and live in Hell." -- General Phillip Sheridan

    Cheers!
    -- Lindy

    http://www.arcanamavens.com
     

    stefan73

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: jAXDIALATION</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Motorcycles are uniquely stupid, as the rider is much more exposed the bad (lethal) driving of others.

    On the plus side young riders usually get killed before they have a chance to procreate and have equally stupid kids. The gene pool is thus enhanced.


    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Stefan73</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Shit happens. If, if, if. If, if were candy and nuts then I'd have a bag full. It takes what to have an excuse not to do something?
    </div></div> </div></div>

    Go hide in a padded room! Its safer.
    Going to war is not safe and neither is law enforcement or igniting a propelant next to your face. The down side of being alive is that it is inherently unsafe and eventualy leads to death. I guess I could live a life of cowardice and hide in suggested safety but I would rather have a life worth enjoying versus cowering in fear!
     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Lindy</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Goldie: I live in Creede during the summer, and Rockport, Texas, the rest of the year.

    I was born a Texan, and will likely die one, but that doesn't mean I have to spend the summer there.

    "If I owned Texas and Hell, I would rent out Texas and live in Hell." -- General Phillip Sheridan

    Cheers!



    -- Lindy

    http://www.arcanamavens.com
    </div></div>

    Thanks for the photo. Ive been in that area. Beautiful. Cold, but beautiful.
     

    Alderleet

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Start Fast, Die Fast.


    Get something cheap and less powered. Build your awareness to traffic and cornering skills.

    I've been riding a kawi 250 for about 3 months now, and my skills have improved dramatically.

    Even now, thinking in my head "Fuck it, imma buy a gixxer 600 and grab a bigass handful of throttle" just seems straight fucking retarded. I'm not sure if people here have relayed that message to you clearly enough, but damn, this is honestly the most retarded shit you can possibly do.
     

    Maggot

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Alderleet</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Start Fast, Die Fast.


    Get something cheap and less powered. Build your awareness to traffic and cornering skills.

    I've been riding a kawi 250 for about 3 months now, and my skills have improved dramatically.

    Even now, thinking in my head "Fuck it, imma buy a gixxer 600 and grab a bigass handful of throttle" just seems straight fucking retarded. I'm not sure if people here have relayed that message to you clearly enough, but damn, this is honestly the most retarded shit you can possibly do. </div></div>

    Yep....."Here is one of the most valuable tips I learned from a friend....."Your right hand is directly linked to your dick. The harder you turn the throttle the stiffer your dick gets which feeds back to the right hand which feeds back to the dick...and so on." In other words the faster you go the cooler it feels so you go even faster which feels even cooler so you go faster which feels cooler..... ."
     

    sr15match

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    I can't really agree with some of the postings above but like everyone, we have our opinions. The bike you're looking to buy is a good start. Yes, like I said in my original post they are good runners but it doesn't mean you have to run it hard. YOU have the ability to control yourself. I've been riding street bikes for over 15 years and yes have had a major accident but not everyone does, thank god. It's no different than on my 09' Busa, sure it has A/B/C mode for engine management but in the end my right hand is calling the shots.

    Sure, an indeal situation for some is to buy small and work their way up and I thinks thats a great way to learn. Use the UK for example where they all start out on small 50 / 125 / 250 bikes. When they first test their license is limited to 500cc. It's not unil they are older and take another test that they can get a unlimited license. Yep, it can make for better riders but they have a lot of deaths and crazy fuckers over there too.

    But in the end it's a personal choice on what you buy or who you listen to. You can learn and grow with the GSXR 600 quite easily. If you only have the budget to buy one bike and will keep it for years then again it makes sense. There has been some good advice given and I won't knock that one bit. For sure a good weekend riders course, take your time to learn your bike, hone your skills, know your limitations, ride with other folks (like minded and not boy racers), and be the most alert person on the road because the crazy cagers will try and run you over everyday! Don't let the small bikes fool you either. You can do stupid things, make wrong choices, freeze in the middle of a turn, hit guard-rails, have people turn left in front of you just as easily on one of those as riding any bike. Otherwise get riding, learn, enjoy and stay safe.
     

    Ghogs Nightmare

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    DEFINITELY take the motorcycle safety course...trash a bike you didnt pay for. IF you can wait get a dirt bike to learn on or something simple an sell it later.
    .
    I did the same as you my first bike was a Honda F4 600cc. Yeah not ideal first bike but oh well never claimed to be the brightest.
    .
    Love riding won't for a lil while. More idiot drivers than anything an family concerns. I sold mine an said *uck it an took the money to hunt in Africa.
    .
    IF you are gonna get into it PM me I may be able to help you out with some deals on gear depending on sizing.
    .
    Be safe!
     

    stefan73

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    You have to think about your maturity level.
    Take a motorcycle safety course like was posted previously!! It will also help to reduce your insurance. Take a track course. Don't skimp on your gear!
     

    anesvick

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    I would look at a standard, like a Suzuki SV650 if you have groin problems, sport bikes tend to be torture racks unless you are in perfect health.
     

    Grimm

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    I'm not sure I "agree" with a lot of the guys saying get a dirt bike first as growing up I saw a few bad days for dirt bikers that involved trees and hospitalization. My first bike was a full size street cruiser, or to be more correct my dads bike was how I learned to ride. A few hundred pounds of cruiser teaches you to ride and ride well. Those fundamentals can be applied to a crotch rocket but the transition is like going from a hunting mule to a quarter horse.

    GET GOOD PROTECTIVE GEAR!
    My mom, bless herheart bought me a pair of chaps I damn near refused to wear on a ride we did to Vegas from Phoenix on leave. I'm glad my mother didnt stop being a parent when I started being an adult. I hit gravel on US66 and ended up under that steel monster. With a fullface helmet, gloves, over the ankle boots, and a Fonzi jacket I walked away with scuffed leather and an appreciation for road debris.

    Riding a motorcycle is inherently dangerous, but it's also a lot of fun and practical. Gixxers are fast as he'll but you don't HAVE to ride it that way. A lot of guys outgrow even modern 600s and go to liter bikes, but that's because liter bikes tend to be more comfortable IMHO on long rides. Same reason Harley riders don't go coast to coast on sportsters.
     

    USAFDoug

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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Riding a dirt bike and a street bike are completely different... you can throw a dirt bike around when you need to but a street bike is much heavier and you can't do that! Just get on your bike and ride around base for a bit get used to it and go. A 600 isn't that bad if you don't twist the throttle hard! I am working ground safety and we have had I think up to 6 deaths so far this year in the Air Force, it may be higher now, but they were all young kids and there were no other vehicles involved they were all going way to fast and most hit trees or sign posts. It is not that hard to stay safe on a bike as long as you pay attention and ride within your limits!

    Go nuts on a track...
     

    Basher

    I fly stuff and I know things.
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    Minuteman
    Dec 13, 2004
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    Chandler AZ, USA
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Some good advice here. I started riding at the age of 10 on a Yamaha YSR50, and spent the next 8-9 years on that tiny little two smoker. It taught me a LOT about how to manipulate a bike in various ways, and how to ride efficiently (for lack of a better word). At 19, I jumped from a 50cc two stroke to a coworkers 750cc sportbike for a jaunt through our industrial neighborhood where I worked, and was HOOKED. I already loved riding that YSR, but that Honda REALLY sealed the deal. Took me two weeks to get the guts, but I finally asked my father if I could take his '91 ZX6 for a ride, and things took off like a house afire. So it is entirely possible to jump from a tiny bike to a larger one without issue. But you MUST approach your performance limits cautiously, one step at a time. I enjoy sportbikes because they'll generally run circles around standard/cruiser bikes, and I'm a performance oriented guy.

    So, while I can't really recommend a 600 sized sportbike as a good first choice, it CAN be done if you know your limits, ride within them, and respect the bike. It may be ONLY a 600, but the 600s will bite hard and fast if you disrespect them!!! Might I also suggest you get an older model? They'll still run like a raped ape if you want, them to, but they're a) generally a little heavier and not quite so track-focused/twitchy, and b) if it's already got some light rash from previous owner get-offs, you won't cry as much when you drop it at the pump or dump it while learning. Please note, you CAN learn without ever wrecking.

    And indeed, ATGATT (all the gear, all the time). Buy quality, and you won't regret it!
     

    teknikallysekure

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Rarebreed93</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I thought you guy's were big on buy American? </div></div>

    What American options are there?
     

    teknikallysekure

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    OP I'm about 3200 miles into my first bike, so I think I may have some very fresh, but helpful experience.

    I got my 2005 Ducati Monster 620 about 3 months ago in the middle of rainy season, and sold my V8 truck. I've saved so much money in gas I've paid the bike off
    laugh.gif


    I think the Ducati Monster s2r, and 620's are ideal starter bikes. They have the capability for the power that will entertain and outpace any new rider for quite a while, but not so much snappy response and strength that they will easily overwhelm a new rider like the sharper toothed Japanese sport bikes.

    They're also limited to something near 70hp, so they have a more classical powerband than something bred to race.

    Everyone is right here about gear buy the best you can, and buy stuff that's so awesome you'll want to wear it. Don't get something at all annoying thinking you'll wear it anyways before long you'll be talking yourself out of the annoying riding pants.

    Dianese makes really high quality protective gear that looks and feels good. Easy to wear out.

    Get out to a track day. You want to know how to corner before you start shredding through blind twisties outside of town going 90.

    Also, have fun and enjoy looking cool.

    I stopped by for a friend's birthday tonight and 3 girls walked up as soon as I'd parked my bike and told me how sexy it was. They said that in front of their boyfriends hahaha.

    Stay wihin your limits don't ride with advanced riders and try to keep up that's how people die.

    Go easy into corners you don't know, you can hit 'em harder once you know 'em.


    248650_635103146331_29001254_34017439_972981_n.jpg


    Yeah it def needs new pipes.
     

    Alderleet

    NCOIC of Shitposts
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    Minuteman
    Feb 12, 2010
    909
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    Downrange
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Nice bike. I'll have to post pics of my Aprilia Shiver once I get back to UT
     

    Switchblade

    muf kin poser
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    MSF Basic Course is ok for a first bike owner. It gives a fair amount of training. For a first bike for anyone who has never ridden until an MSF course, I only recommend 400cc or smaller. Yeah they arre small, yes they are fairly underpowered and slow. THAT is so you won't get your ass killed or do something stupid. Leave the 600+ bikes for those who know how to ride, or those who will sooner or later end up in a ditch, against a wall, into a tree...you get the idea.
    When you master the Dual Sport type bike, you are ready for a cruiser or a real sport bike...or a super moto if oyu love the handling of that dirt style bike. Don't waste your time with a 600 at that point. Get at least 900cc's. You have the discipline to keep that right hand from doing dumb shit. You will soon enough master the higher powered bike in no time at all, then you can run circles around, well beginners
    grin.gif

    You want to ride fast? Get your ass into a school that teaches track styled riding and pay attention. Try competing in amatuer events...you'lllearn you are slow as shit, or maybe even fast enough to see the tail lights of the really fast guys and girls.
    BE AWARE of your surroundings, especially chicks texting, SUV's and construction trucks. These motherfuckers will merge right on top of you and you will lose that battle...BTDT, and have the scars to prove it.

    Riding motorcycles is fun as hell. RIding them really fast is even more fun. Doing it better than everyone else, well that just has certain satisfaction, but I'm good because I got close to 40 years on two wheels under my belt on shit from Honda XR75's to insanely powered 500cc two stroke replica GP bikes. The most fun ever though? My cafe Sporty on a nice twisty back road with no one else around...that shit rocks!
     

    Graham

    Generalissimo
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    Minuteman
    Oct 30, 2007
    49,811
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    Michigan
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: COURAGEWOLF</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I got my 2005 Ducati Monster 620 about 3 months ago in the middle of rainy season, and sold my V8 truck....Ducati Monster s2r, and 620's are ideal starter bikes. They have the capability for the power that will entertain and outpace any new rider for quite a while, but not so much snappy response and strength that they will easily overwhelm a new rider like the sharper toothed Japanese sport bikes. They're also limited to something near 70hp, so they have a more classical powerband than something bred to race.</div></div>Nice choice. That's a very competent bike - they run well in that powerband between 3000 and 5000 rpm. Besides, 50-70hp is plenty for the street - I still don't know how to use more than that on the street except in a straight line.

    It's so easy, on any bike, to run out of skill. The faster the bike the easier it is to get in over your head. I know: I've done it. Heck, I still do it on my R1 when I am not paying attention.

    OP, consider Reg Pridmore's CLASS School. It's a one-day street rider school on the track. Expensive at $350, but very worth it.

    Torf, I had a '97 M900. Get the Staintune pipes from Australia:
    Ducati.jpg
     

    BountyHunter

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    Supporter+
    Oct 7, 2003
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    Wilmington NC
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Take the Sport bike course down at Quantico Marine Base. It is free for military and they have two sport bikes for riders that do not have one.
     

    stefan73

    Sergeant
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  • Mar 6, 2006
    2,221
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    CENLA
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Alderleet</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Nice bike. I'll have to post pics of my Aprilia Shiver once I get back to UT </div></div>
    I have a Aprilia Factory.
    This is a picture of me on my Factory at the AF1 Harris Hill track Day.
    3095724609_1d58c553f4_o.jpg
     

    sr15match

    Lost........
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    Minuteman
    Nov 6, 2008
    1,152
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    Wellsville, NY
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Always loved the Factory Ape offerings. That and the Edwards edition are HOT HOT HOT!
     

    Basher

    I fly stuff and I know things.
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    Dec 13, 2004
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    Chandler AZ, USA
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Switchblade</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Don't waste your time with a 600 at that point. Get at least 900cc's. You have the discipline to keep that right hand from doing dumb shit.</div></div>

    I agree with most everything you said, except what's above. Unless you plan to do a lot of 2-up riding, a 600 will serve you well. You'll save money on insurance, gas, and tires, and they're still PLENTY fast. Don't get me wrong, I'd LOVE to have a 2005 ZX10R or R1. They have more torque down low than the 600s, but most of their power is still accessed higher up in the RPM range, which makes it useless to you when you're riding the street, generally speaking. I'll have one eventually, but only because I want it and will be able to afford it then. If you can afford a literbike now, stash that money away for later when you know how to ride one.

    As for your right hand learning to handle that power, I'll also disagree. A dual sport dishes out power very differently than a pure bred superbike does. Sure, you'll have learned to take it easy to some degree, but it'll still be pretty different. You'll be in a new and unfamiliar riding position, and whether you're right hand is disciplined enough or not is something you're not likely to find out until it's too late.

    On my "little" ZX6R, I've broken the rear tire's traction a good number of times (not necessarily on purpose, but I knew what I was doing had the potential for it to happen, so I anticipated it and reacted appropriately), stopped hard enough (with only two fingers on the lever) to get the rear off the ground, power wheelied a few times, and had my share of close calls. If I wanted to, I could keep up with most sports cars, and can hit triple digits before the end of a freeway onramp. Having ridden as long as I have, there were times where I was still caught off guard or was surprised, but mostly it was just me gently pushing the envelope a little. And it's a 2001 model, heavy, wide, and with a high center of gravity that's not "mass centralized." The newer 600s are far more capable. To me, a 600cc sportbike is a good stepping stone form a smaller bike to a liter. Jumping from a dual sport to a literbike, unless you have good self control, is still an unwise move, IMO.
     

    Graham

    Generalissimo
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    Oct 30, 2007
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    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Basher</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Unless you plan to do a lot of 2-up riding, a 600 will serve you well. You'll save money on insurance, gas, and tires, and they're still PLENTY fast. Don't get me wrong, I'd LOVE to have a 2005 ZX10R or R1. They have more torque down low than the 600s, but most of their power is still accessed higher up in the RPM range, which makes it useless to you when you're riding the street, generally speaking.</div></div>I'm not a fan of 600's for anything but serious competition against like machines.

    I rode a new R6 from London to the IOM a few years ago and spent a few weeks with that bike on the Island. Riding it on the M1 was like sitting on a beehive. To get it to pull going up the mountain section required wringing it's neck.

    The problem with 600s is that you have to rev them to make power, which teaches new riders to get ham-fisted with the throttle. Where I live there's little insurance discount between the same bike at 600 or 998ccs. A few years ago the 600 versions were more expensive to insure because that model was crashed more than the 1000cc equivalent. Why? because kids buy 600s and pitch themselves off while messing with the powerband.

    As for gas and tires, you use what you use - they are consumables like ammo and barrels. If you want to save gas, get a Honda Metro. I get 100mpg with mine. If you want to save tires don't go to the track with slicks - otherwise there's not much you'll wear quicker with a 600 in the center of a dual-compound sportbike tire on the street.

    There are lots of good reasons to go with a big bike on the street. Modern fuel injection makes the powerband of most 1000s very linear. Example: The 2002 R1. I wouldn't reccomend a '98 carb R1 for a new rider on the street, but they softened the fuel injection on the '02's and, although it makes much more power at redline, the bike doesn't go mental and overwhelm the suspension to get there.
     

    TNT

    Sergeant
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    Oct 30, 2006
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    Arlington, VA
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Thanks for all the replies. Just an update - deal on the 600 GSXR looks sketchy, so I'm going to opt for a new 250 from a local dealer. Still paying a little more, but piece of mind is worth it. Understand all the concerns on being a throttle jockey, and I know a 250 can still put me on my butt if I'm not extremely careful. Frankly, a 600 is probably as high as I'll end up going, eventually.

    Question on the gear - CE armor rated jackets/pants - these look to be nylon mesh with cordorua outer. My instinct i that leather would be better road rash protection. How do these nylon/cordura jackets hold up? Definitely would prefer to armor up with pads though. Experience from snowboarding has taught me that much.

    Also, for helmets, if it's DOT/Snell approved, is the real difference just the style? I know getting one that fits is the key, but if there are any specific recommendations for a full-face, price isn't too much of an issue for me.

    Thanks for all the replies.
     

    Pat M

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 28, 2005
    1,879
    18
    Cashmere Washington
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Full face helmet, try lots on and find one that fits just right, sucks if your helmet is too loose or too tight. A good pair of gloves that give you flex.

    Bike: i would go for a used 500cc-650cc , ? Honda Nighthawk, Yamaha Radian (less plastic for you to scuff up)
     

    Graham

    Generalissimo
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    Oct 30, 2007
    49,811
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    Michigan
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    Leather is always the best, Kangaroo being superlative but also super-expensive.

    But leather gets wet and dirty on the street, and won't dry-out even on long trips. And Nylon mesh just plain doesn't work in a real crash, but I suppose it's better than nothing.

    That's why I suggested Aerostich: I've crashed in my suit a few times, and rebuilt the suit once. The 1000 denier nylon slides more than leathers do, and it can get warm inside the suit while sliding at over 130mph (leading to mild burns), but the suits are durable and the armor is good quality - I have walked away because I had an Aerostich on when with anything else other than full race leaathers I probably would have broken something.

    A word to the wise: Helmets don't always fit correctly in the store. Don't get one that is too loose initially, as all of them break-in and loosen up over time. If you plan to do any serious seat-time get an Arai. They are a bit noisy but absolutely the most comfortable.
     

    Basher

    I fly stuff and I know things.
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    Minuteman
    Dec 13, 2004
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    Chandler AZ, USA
    Re: Flame on sports bike enthusiasts

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Graham</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I rode a new R6 from London to the IOM a few years ago and spent a few weeks with that bike on the Island. Riding it on the M1 was like sitting on a beehive. To get it to pull going up the mountain section required wringing it's neck.

    The problem with 600s is that you have to rev them to make power, which teaches new riders to get ham-fisted with the throttle. Where I live there's little insurance discount between the same bike at 600 or 998ccs. A few years ago the 600 versions were more expensive to insure because that model was crashed more than the 1000cc equivalent. Why? because kids buy 600s and pitch themselves off while messing with the powerband.</div></div>

    First let me address a the points I didn't quote, mainly tires. They ARE a consumable, and your use of any bike needs to include the price of a regular tire change in any budget you may draw up. That being said, unless you're REALLY wringing your bike out, you won't need serious sport rubber for the street. I've never had true sportbike tires on my bike, but have rather gone the route of sport-touring rubber. I got almost 16,000 miles out of my last pair of tires, a set of Pirelli Diablo Stradas (Pirelli's "Extended Mileage Sport" tires at the time, now replaced by the Angel ST or some such). I'm not kidding. I wore them down to the point where the belt was starting to show in a few places on the rear, but I still had life in the front! I don't ride my bike like a wuss, but I also don't drag knee anywhere, so I feel you can definitely get your money's worth if you buy good tires.

    As for your points above, I'll agree to an extent. I don't feel the need to play boy racer at stoplights when the light goes green. Riding a 50cc two stroke for as long as I did, I learned the value of good clutch manipulation, and as such I rarely have to rev the bike up much to get off the line. More than a literbike, sure, but I'd be surprised if I passed 2,000-2,500 rpm when starting from a stop, and my bike idles at 1,300. Your points are much more valid in areas with some serious elevation changes, though. Here in AZ, I don't get much of that, so I'm fine there. In a location with lots of up and downs, I can see the value of more torque being available. I spent last summer in Utah and had the chance to try out a Ducati 848 (drool!), and the difference in how that bike behaved was very noticable, especially when dealing with going up steep hills. I rode it similar to how I ride my ZX6R down here in AZ. In contrast, my 6R did require more "effort" on the bikes behalf to get going. I guess what makes a "good" bike can vary from one location to the next, so some local input would be helpful to the OP.

    As for folks wrecking 600s more often, that may be true, but I think those stats are skewed as a result of more people learning on them and not being careful. If more people started out on 750cc+ bikes, I bet we'd see a rise in accidents with them. Maybe that's just me.

    All I know is, a bike is a bike, and one can kill you just as easy as the next if you don't use them wisely! But hot dang, they're the only way to get around if you really wanna live life!

    ETA: The R6, especially the newer year models from '06 to the present, are most notable for needing an extra nudge to get going. Of all the 600s out there, it's my understanding that they hide their power higher in the rpm range than the rest of the class, and as such will be happier when you're "wringing their necks."
    smile.gif