Installation of Badger EFR on Mcmillan a5

Wilderness

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Minuteman
Sep 28, 2020
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38
Houston TX
Afternoon. Debating on picking one of these up. I do not have access to a mill or CNC machines, but I'm sure I'm sure I can make due with hand-tools and Dremel attachments. Have any of you ever attempted this install personally? Looking for any advice one may be willing to share. Looks basic enough.

Template and drill holes in corners to correct depth, wheel cut the sides/front and back, remove material from middle, and sand flush. Use tape. Test fit often, epoxy in.... anything else to consider? I'm not waiting weeks for someone to experiment an install on my rig. I just assume do it. Thanks in advance.
 

Terry Cross

Dingleberry
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Mar 15, 2003
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You may already have this considered but if not.....

Make sure your existing barrel contour will work with the EFR.
The EFR will have a fixed I.D. and you need to make sure you will not have a conflict.

Most HV and MTU contours either touch or are so close they rub when the rifle is fired and the forend loaded.

./
 
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LongRifles Inc.

Lance Criminal
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Mar 14, 2010
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Good point. I’ll have to take some measurements. I’ve got a sendero contour.

The Sendero will fit with no issue. It gets to be a squeeze with MTU and other "fatty" barrels. If you insist on doing this yourself your path of least resistance will be to inlet this on the loose side of things. Get a roll of tape and wrap your barrel up with it so that it acts like an alignment mandrel. Clamp the EFR mount to it. Assemble the barreled action in the stock. Now check the parallelism of the rail to the top of the action and/or scope base (use a zero MOA base for this part)

Adjust your wound up tape rings accordingly until it installs correctly.

Once you have that done, wet the part and the stock with resin and squish it together. TAPE OFF your entire barrel channel as it's going to squirt in places you don't want it to. I would use a nylon-reinforced packing tape right up the edges so that when the resin cures, you have something stout to break the resin free from the channel. Otherwise, you are going to have a tall order getting it all cleaned up. Use a release agent of some kind on every surface you don't want the epoxy to stick to. Paste wax, shoe polish, or whatever.

The mount may or may not sit directly on the showline of the stock. It's all dependent upon how the stock was inletted for the action and how it was bedded. The idea though is to have the mount concentric to the barrel once assembled. Here, we just machine the pocket, pull the barrel, and use a machined mandrel to align everything. Easy stuff.

Not impossible to do, but you'll be there awhile getting that inlet done if you want it clean with well-defined edges.

Good luck, hope this helps.

C.
 
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Wilderness

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Minuteman
Sep 28, 2020
75
38
Houston TX
Thanks for the tips. I didn't consider taping the barrel channel off. I'm going to tape the hell out of everything. I think I can make it work and still look good. I make my own knives, kydex work, build ak's, refinish wood, and various other tedium the home brewer would mess up... I'm going to cut the straight lines obviously narrower than needed and use jewelry files/400 grit to take off more material. The Mcmillan stock is solid, but a file makes short work of it from what I have messed with so far. Had to fine tune fit my action and trigger group.

Debating some sort of mill bit chucked to my drill press and raising the platform until it reaches the desired depth...then moving the vice around by hand to grind out the bottom "flat" portion of the EFR. just to get the big stuff done, than fine tune with sharp chisels.
 

Wilderness

Private
Minuteman
Sep 28, 2020
75
38
Houston TX
Nice...That's what I was thinking. Just slowly eat away at the stock. Did you use a wheel on the straight lines? I'm thinking a really sharp box cutter type blade would work well. The Mcmillan is solid, but it seems to break down/shave off pretty easy from what I have done so fare to action area for trigger fitment.