New M-BRACE Scope Mount from American Rifle Company

karagias

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Hi folks. Ted here form American Rifle Company introducing our M-BRACE Scope Mount. Now available for purchase at https://www.americanrifle.com/shop/product/m-brace-mount-1402 for $279.

This mount has no equal, at any price. But for $279, I think we're really getting good at giving you what you want at an incredible price. And yes, it's all 7075 aluminum.

The mount is derived from our M10 rings which provides for super simple installation that doesn't roll your scope when tightening the scope clamp. But the big innovation is the serrated accessory interface. We offer an LRF mount that connects to both sides of the mount base by way of serrations, effectively unitizing the LRF and the mount to absolutely guarantee a constant positional relationship between your scope and laser range finder or other aiming device. This is an engineered product for which loads are the primary consideration.

A level vial is also included and can be positioned in various locations. Pick the one that works best for you. Auxiliary Pic rail is also available that can be secured to either the M-BRACE mount or the LRF mount, all by way of the serrated interface.

And as always, our goods are designed by American Rifle Company and made by American Rifle Company right here in the USA, actually just north of the communist homeless encampment otherwise know as Seattle.

Enjoy...

Ted

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BLKWLFK9

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    Damn. I didnt think I'd find something to take me away from my m10 rings. I've got like 4 sets of them.
     
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    karagias

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    Here are some pics of my setup. I should have made this a long time ago. Thanks to Caylen Wojcik of Modern Day Rifleman for the impetus. Back in January, or maybe it was December, I asked Caylen why he wasn't using our QD-L scope mount. He replied it was because we didn't provide an LRF solution. So that got me thinking about the problem. It's hard to resist a good problem. I'm glad this is now done.

    Ted
     

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    Baron23

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    Hi folks. Ted here form American Rifle Company introducing our M-BRACE Scope Mount. Now available for purchase at https://www.americanrifle.com/shop/product/m-brace-mount-1402 for $279.

    This mount has no equal, at any price. But for $279, I think we're really getting good at giving you what you want at an incredible price. And yes, it's all 7075 aluminum.

    The mount is derived from our M10 rings which provides for super simple installation that doesn't roll your scope when tightening the scope clamp. But the big innovation is the serrated accessory interface. We offer an LRF mount that connects to both sides of the mount base by way of serrations, effectively unitizing the LRF and the mount to absolutely guarantee a constant positional relationship between your scope and laser range finder or other aiming device. This is an engineered product for which loads are the primary consideration.

    A level vial is also included and can be positioned in various locations. Pick the one that works best for you. Auxiliary Pic rail is also available that can be secured to either the M-BRACE mount or the LRF mount, all by way of the serrated interface.

    And as always, our goods are designed by American Rifle Company and made by American Rifle Company right here in the USA, actually just north of the communist homeless encampment otherwise know as Seattle.

    Enjoy...

    Ted

    View attachment 7703486
    View attachment 7703487View attachment 7703493
    Very nice and I love my M10 rings....and you aren't even taking the opportunity to stick it to us on price....unlike...well...haha

    Any plans for a QR version?
     

    Nik H

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    Hi folks. Ted here form American Rifle Company introducing our M-BRACE Scope Mount. Now available for purchase at https://www.americanrifle.com/shop/product/m-brace-mount-1402 for $279.

    This mount has no equal, at any price. But for $279, I think we're really getting good at giving you what you want at an incredible price. And yes, it's all 7075 aluminum.

    The mount is derived from our M10 rings which provides for super simple installation that doesn't roll your scope when tightening the scope clamp. But the big innovation is the serrated accessory interface. We offer an LRF mount that connects to both sides of the mount base by way of serrations, effectively unitizing the LRF and the mount to absolutely guarantee a constant positional relationship between your scope and laser range finder or other aiming device. This is an engineered product for which loads are the primary consideration.

    A level vial is also included and can be positioned in various locations. Pick the one that works best for you. Auxiliary Pic rail is also available that can be secured to either the M-BRACE mount or the LRF mount, all by way of the serrated interface.

    And as always, our goods are designed by American Rifle Company and made by American Rifle Company right here in the USA, actually just north of the communist homeless encampment otherwise know as Seattle.

    Enjoy...

    Ted

    View attachment 7703486
    View attachment 7703487View attachment 7703493
    Nice job Ted...does the level allow for mounting on the other side for us southpaws

    My wallet is hurting already
     

    karagias

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    Very nice and I love my M10 rings....and you aren't even taking the opportunity to stick it to us on price....unlike...well...haha

    Any plans for a QR version?
    You had to ask for a QD version, didn't you? Would you settle for a T-handle wrench on a lanyard? Just kidding.

    QD is kind of a bitch on a Pic rail. The only two QD methods that I like are thumb screws, like we did with the QD-L, and the levers from American Defense and I think those guys sell to other OEMs. Nevertheless, for a bolt action rifle having potentially very heavy recoil, I really prefer screws. Screws just work every time and you would never be able to match their clamping forces with a lever that would fit on a scope mount. We've considered QD. Give us a PO for a few hundred of them and I'll do it;)

    As far as the price goes, well it's good. Really good. Capitalism 101, better product, lower price, higher volume, more income for ARC and dealers.

    And it is a better product. It's actually the best scope mount available, especially if you intend to use and the LRF mount for a laser range finder or anything else that must stay aligned to the scope. Supporting an LRF to Pic rail cantilevered from a scope ring cap or from just one side of the mount now seems foolish when one can now see how to do this correctly via the M-BRACE's serrated interface. The engineers in the audience will appreciate the serrations ability to carry moments. And if they don't they should seek a new line of work. Serrations have been used for ages in all sorts of machines that required bomb-proof mechanical joints. I was aware of Hirth couplings and serrated work-holding devices so it was an easy choice. In the case of the M-BRACE, the serration carry the moments while the conical (flat) head screws pre-load the joints and provides an excellent radial constraint. We considered serrations emanating radially from the screw hole but that would have made assembly and disassembly rather cumbersome. As designed, one can simply remove two screws and lift the LRF and it's mount from the M-BRACE without affecting the scope in the rings. Additionally, the scope clamp screws remain accessible even when the LRF mount is in place. This might be helpful if one wishes to adjust the role (cant) of the scope within the rings with removing the LRF.

    All that said, I know that most folks outside of the military do not own weapon mounted laser range finders but the LRF mount is nevertheless useful for anything else you might want to do. It actually provides excellent cover for the scope providing protection against a collision with a barricade. And it is obviously good for mounting levels like the send it or data cards, or both. In fact, I promised the folks at Kestrel that we would make an serrated interface for their HUD. That's coming soon.

    The M-BRACE is currently as good as mounts get. It doesn't have the toy-ish-ness of other mounts that are made from 6061 or the obviously inferior accessory connections that cannot resist recoil forces as the serrations can. And when combined with the super easy roll-free scope installation of our M10 Scope Ring design, and, oh yeah, the $279 price, well then it's a no brainer. Just buy it. Happiness is included at no extra charge.

    Ted
     
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    Baron23

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    Would you settle for a T-handle wrench on a lanyard?
    hahaha....well Ted...maybe! haha

    Give us a PO for a few hundred of them and I'll do it
    LOL....sorry, I'm one of the poors....well, not really but no....no order from me. Maybe Theis is your man? ;-)

    And I do get it, Ted, and I really don't swap scopes from rifle to rifle but it does seem that others, do hence the question.

    And I do get what you are saying about available clamping force, etc. All good and very reasonable.

    And thanks for taking the time to reply with this additional information. All good. I'm not a groupie of....well, anybody really...but I thought your streaming interview with Wojcik....when was that...last winter??....was the one of the very most interesting one of that series. You are a very interesting guy, Ted, with interesting and innovative products.

    I'm in the midst of a new build and not yet ready for scope mount, but will seriously consider this mount since after owning the M10 rings I don't think I will ever buy another top half cap type, traditional ring set again.

    Cheers
     

    Nik H

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    Hi folks. Ted here form American Rifle Company introducing our M-BRACE Scope Mount. Now available for purchase at https://www.americanrifle.com/shop/product/m-brace-mount-1402 for $279.

    This mount has no equal, at any price. But for $279, I think we're really getting good at giving you what you want at an incredible price. And yes, it's all 7075 aluminum.

    The mount is derived from our M10 rings which provides for super simple installation that doesn't roll your scope when tightening the scope clamp. But the big innovation is the serrated accessory interface. We offer an LRF mount that connects to both sides of the mount base by way of serrations, effectively unitizing the LRF and the mount to absolutely guarantee a constant positional relationship between your scope and laser range finder or other aiming device. This is an engineered product for which loads are the primary consideration.

    A level vial is also included and can be positioned in various locations. Pick the one that works best for you. Auxiliary Pic rail is also available that can be secured to either the M-BRACE mount or the LRF mount, all by way of the serrated interface.

    And as always, our goods are designed by American Rifle Company and made by American Rifle Company right here in the USA, actually just north of the communist homeless encampment otherwise know as Seattle.

    Enjoy...

    Ted

    View attachment 7703486
    View attachment 7703487View attachment 7703493
    Ted

    What would the height from the rifles pic rail to the LRF pic rail be if the ring height selected is 1.5"?
     

    CMP70306

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    Welp found something else to add to the “must buy” list, now I will finally be able to mount my Radius on top of my Revic since I only use M10 rings on my rifles.
     

    karagias

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    Ted

    What would the height from the rifles pic rail to the LRF pic rail be if the ring height selected is 1.5"?
    The top of the LRF rail is position 48mm (1.89 in) above the centerline of the scope regardless of mount diameter, height, or inclination. Therefore, LRF rail to pic rail is simply 48mm + mount height. In your case, 48 + 38 = 86mm (3.39 in).

    It's also worth noting that the LRF mount follows the inclination of the mount. In other words, the serrations run perpendicular to the scope tube. So if an LRF mount is used with a 30 MOA M-BRACE mount, the the Pic rail of the LRF mount will also be inclined at 30 MOA with respect to the rifle's Pic rail.

    Ted
     

    ormandj

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    @karagias

    Would this type of mounting solution be possible on updated M10 rings? With an AntiX action the pic rail is split, so unfortunately, I don’t think this will work. Not sure if a single ring has the clamping force you’re looking for to support accessories.

    Great new product, I’ll pick up a few for my full pic rail rifles. This was the last thing keeping me with Spuhr mounts.
     
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    Devildog

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    More money leaving my pocket heading to yours. ARC rings is all I buy and for good reason. This new M-brace look amazing, I’ll certainly be picking some up. Good job!
     
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    AXMC

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    I like the design! Can we see some pics of the bottom of the mount? Any chance you've added a squared recoil lug to interface with the pic slots?
    Thanks
     
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    chase723

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    @karagias These are great. I’m going to buy one. I know it’s a long shot but would you consider making one for the March 1-10 and 1-8 shorties?…They require a 33mm ring in the front and 30mm ring in the rear. This mount setup w/the LRF mount would be perfect for that especially when running thermals/NV. The LRF mount would also double as a sunshade/rain shade and objective protection for it.
     

    karagias

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    Ted, looks great and I hope you sell a boatload. Might you have time to finish up the direct mount Mausingfield rings now?
    We've been working on those every day for the past couple of weeks. We actually finish designs during NC programing which is where we're at now. We'll be making chips really soon. Price for the pair will be about $500. I know, that a lot for a pair of rings but there a big difference between what one can offer from a high-volume aluminum set-up (M10 rings) and a low-volume hard-metal set-up (M7 rings shown below). These are designed to connect directly to our open top hunting Mausingfield actions. Here's a seek peek right off the CAD screen.
    Ted

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    karagias

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    @karagias These are great. I’m going to buy one. I know it’s a long shot but would you consider making one for the March 1-10 and 1-8 shorties?…They require a 33mm ring in the front and 30mm ring in the rear. This mount setup w/the LRF mount would be perfect for that especially when running thermals/NV. The LRF mount would also double as a sunshade/rain shade and objective protection for it.
    Technically feasible but that would likely take time that we don't have right now. The demand for this is just not high enough to warrant the effort. Had I known about this scope when I designed the mount, I could have built the CAD model in a way that could accommodate this. That said, sometimes I find myself unable to sleep at 3 AM and I might get up to revisit this model. I am curious about it and now that the M-BRACE design is stable, constructing the CAD model for the 33-30 might not be too bad, or it might suck. It also depends on how badly the CAM operations are affected. No promises at this point.

    Ted
     

    Nik H

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    The top of the LRF rail is position 48mm (1.89 in) above the centerline of the scope regardless of mount diameter, height, or inclination. Therefore, LRF rail to pic rail is simply 48mm + mount height. In your case, 48 + 38 = 86mm (3.39 in).

    It's also worth noting that the LRF mount follows the inclination of the mount. In other words, the serrations run perpendicular to the scope tube. So if an LRF mount is used with a 30 MOA M-BRACE mount, the the Pic rail of the LRF mount will also be inclined at 30 MOA with respect to the rifle's Pic rail.

    Ted
    Thanks Ted. I was a little confused when looking at the drawings on the LRF page. I guess it is coincidental that the height from the screw attachment point on the LRF to the inside surface is also 48 mm....LOL. I didn't see the lower drawings of the assembled LRF and mount when I looked yesterday, hence the question. My LRF has co-sited aiming lasers that are not on the centerline of the LRF or the dayscope. Therefore, I construct a target to co-witness the lasers to the centerline of the dayscope. The reflective part of the target has to be offset in both vertical and horizontal directions from reticle center. See below

    RAPTAR Zero Target.jpg


    Thanks for your help. I will definitely be ordering one of these. Use your rings on my other sticks and can't say enough good about them
     

    karagias

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    I like the design! Can we see some pics of the bottom of the mount? Any chance you've added a squared recoil lug to interface with the pic slots?
    Thanks
    It's already there because we knew someone would ask. However, it is not necessary. The four rail clamp screws each engage a slot making a squared lug superfluous. Superfluous is something I normally avoid because it is not in accordance with my form follows function style. But in this case, I acquiesced because it didn't require a performance or manufacturing compromise.

    I'm glad you brought this up. It gives me an opportunity to remind folks that ARC can advertise substantive features. For instance, in the case of the M-BRACE, ARC can be proud of the following:
    1. M10 ring design that doesn't role the the scope during installation
    2. M10 ring design that doesn't spall the finish of the scope tube
    3. Rail clamp screws placed as low as possible in the rails slots thereby arresting recoil
    4. Rail clamp screws placed approximately between the rail clamp contact areas maximizing its ability to immobilize the mount with respect to the rail
    5. Crowned rail clamp interface that properly engage the rail and the mount an that tolerates variation in rail section
    A squared lug doesn't make this list because, as I previously stated, it's superfluous. It's also worth mentioning that "the internet" thinks that a flat surface of the lug in contact with a flat surface of the rail is somehow superior to any alternative. But what "the internet' doesn't do is think about the details of such contact, which, when loaded is essential edge on flat. When thinking about contact between parts, an engineer, in contrast to "the internet," might remind himself of a logarithmic profile bearing. I'm not saying that that's applicable in the case, but it does illustrate that contact is often considered in great detail.

    "The internet" also thinks that scopes need to be mounted as low as possible. That too is completely bull shit at least because the bullet's trajectory is 3-dimensional. The shooter's comfort is what should prioritize the height of the scope.

    Nevertheless, the lug made it onto the mount, and it did so for those who will not read my paragraphs above.

    Thanks for asking and for providing me with an opportunity of illuminate a couple of points, however small they may be.

    Ted

    1631800246631.png
     
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    karagias

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    Thanks Ted. I was a little confused when looking at the drawings on the LRF page. I guess it is coincidental that the height from the screw attachment point on the LRF to the inside surface is also 48 mm....LOL. I didn't see the lower drawings of the assembled LRF and mount when I looked yesterday, hence the question. My LRF has co-sited aiming lasers that are not on the centerline of the LRF or the dayscope. Therefore, I construct a target to co-witness the lasers to the centerline of the dayscope. The reflective part of the target has to be offset in both vertical and horizontal directions from reticle center. See below

    View attachment 7704368

    Thanks for your help. I will definitely be ordering one of these. Use your rings on my other sticks and can't say enough good about them
    Justin has since added some more info on the LRF page.


    Feel free to call and he will discuss.

    Ted
     
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    karagias

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    I want to thank you and curse you for making this mount. Thank you, because this is pretty much exactly what I've been looking for. Curse you, because I now need to save more money for the best mount now out there!
    Well look at the bright side, it's only $279 and better than mounts that cost more, even those that cost much more. I would do more if I could, but...

    Ted
     

    karagias

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    @karagias

    Would this type of mounting solution be possible on updated M10 rings? With an AntiX action the pic rail is split, so unfortunately, I don’t think this will work. Not sure if a single ring has the clamping force you’re looking for to support accessories.

    Great new product, I’ll pick up a few for my full pic rail rifles. This was the last thing keeping me with Spuhr mounts.
    I'm not sure I understand your question. Are you suggesting that we design separate rings each having serrated interfaces? Designing such rings would be a bad idea. The serrations can resist large moments. In this case, think of moments as forces resulting from recoil (acceleration of the LRF mass) that tend to tear the mount from the rail. These moments really should be transferred into the rifle's receiver over some length, hence the integration of the serrations into a mount that is much longer than a stand alone ring.

    Mounting an LRF to a single ring is a really bad idea because it would transfer the moments primarily into the scope tube as it offers the stiffest load path back to the rifle. It's almost as bad as mounting an LRF to a diving-board pic rail cantilevered from a scope ring cap, an idea categorized as cranial-ooze.

    Ted
     
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    ormandj

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    I'm not sure I understand your question. Are you suggesting that we design separate rings each having serrated interfaces? Designing such rings would be a bad idea. The serrations can resist large moments. In this case, think of moments as forces resulting from recoil (acceleration of the LRF mass) that tend to tear the mount from the rail. These moments really should be transferred into the rifle's receiver over some length, hence the integration of the serrations into a mount that is much longer than a stand alone ring.

    Mounting an LRF to a single ring is a really bad idea because it would transfer the moments primarily into the scope tube as it offers the stiffest load path back to the rifle. It's almost as bad as mounting an LRF to a diving-board pic rail cantilevered from a scope ring cap, an idea categorized as cranial-ooze.

    Ted
    I understand what you're driving at from an engineering perspective, but I wasn't thinking for specifically LRF use, but more things like levels, RDS, and other lightweight attachments of a few oz or less. I'm not sure if you could offer a "light duty" version for split rings, where you obviously wouldn't be hanging a pound off it. Either way, I'm excited to swap out the Spuhr mounts, so thank you for this new design.
     

    karagias

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    I understand what you're driving at from an engineering perspective, but I wasn't thinking for specifically LRF use, but more things like levels, RDS, and other lightweight attachments of a few oz or less. I'm not sure if you could offer a "light duty" version for split rings, where you obviously wouldn't be hanging a pound off it. Either way, I'm excited to swap out the Spuhr mounts, so thank you for this new design.
    Interesting idea. Minimum ring height would be 32mm if identical serrations are used. You make a good point. Light weight attachments would be OK. Maybe that would be something for the distant future.

    Someday we need to collaborate with Sniper's Hide on a public design project in real time. Maybe we design something like a tactical lever action rifle. Not sure how intellectual property would work with that but it would be fun.

    Ted
     

    CMP70306

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    Someday we need to collaborate with Sniper's Hide on a public design project in real time. Maybe we design something like a tactical lever action rifle. Not sure how intellectual property would work with that but it would be fun.

    Ted

    Count my vote for the tactical long range lever action, as a fan of the Winchester 95 I love lever guns with box mags and Spitzer bullets but that is in no way a long range rifle with its open top design.

    It would be interesting to see if you could design a lever action that used AICS mags and had a lever stroke short enough to facilitate prone shooting with a not god awful trigger pull.
     
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    karagias

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    Serious lack of 36mm cantilevers on the market.
    How much cantilever would you want? The M-BRACE cantilevers by up to 1.27 inches (lower pic) if you don't use the forward screw. Doing so would be fine without the mass of an LRF. But if you need a cantilevered mount and an LRF, you need to find a place on the rifle to connect the LRF. I wouldn't recommend connecting an LRF to any cantilevered mount unless it's a super lightweight LRF. Does that even exist?

    Ted

    1631889336951.png
     
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