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New spotting scope?

regnar375

Sergeant of the Hide
Full Member
Minuteman
Dec 24, 2018
252
68
raymond NH
I need a new spotting scope. my question is this, is there any real reason to get one with a milling reticle? you cant give corrections in competitions and im no longer in the military. what other reason would I need one?
 

regnar375

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Minuteman
Dec 24, 2018
252
68
raymond NH
You could use it during practice and to learn while others are shooting.

Not being a dick but what can I learn eith a mil reticle thats I cant with a normal reticle? i don't know his dope and dont know his holds. i really want one, dont get me wrong, but cant figure out how to justify the cost.
 

pell1203

Stay Focused!
Full Member
Minuteman
  • Dec 27, 2007
    1,380
    420
    Bellevue, WA
    regnar375, in your prior post you mention both a mil reticle and a normal reticle. In your mind are there any differences between these two reticles?

    As an example, why not hook up with a shooting buddy and communicate wind holds and corrections with each other while practicing. Believe me, both of you would get an education! :)

    As to cost issue, the spotter reticle is there only for the convenience of having the measuring ruler directly in front of your nose to best allow you to quickly and accurately communicate a correction.If in your intended use you see no benefit in directly measuring through the spotter then it absolutely makes no sense for you to spend more for the reticle.
     

    TheGerman

    Oberleutnant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Jan 25, 2010
    9,222
    23,640
    the Westside
    Not being a dick but what can I learn eith a mil reticle thats I cant with a normal reticle? i don't know his dope and dont know his holds. i really want one, dont get me wrong, but cant figure out how to justify the cost.

    When he's 10 inches left and 9 inches low at 780 yards you can do one of the following:

    - Realize that you have no fucking idea what 10 inches looks like at 780 yards and give some random best guess that he then gets to do math with to try and figure out what the adjustment should be

    OR

    - Use the calibrated ruler that's in-front of your eye and tell him exactly, in the same measurements his scope is in, what his correction is without having to do any math on either your or his part


    You don't need to know his ballistics; trhe correction is the correction on his current ballistics, assuming you're both using the same system of MOA or MILS. 1 MIL still equals 1MIL regardless of the distance. Nothing is as fucking useless as a spotter telling me shit like 'hit below the target a bit' or 'it went to the right of the plate'.
     
    Last edited:

    sfogold

    Dictator
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jul 29, 2012
    95
    38
    Northern, CA
    Not really needed - However, if you want the option, and not look at it all the time, Swaro's is electronic and you can turn it on and off.
     

    SAS_Sniper

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    May 16, 2009
    409
    72
    37
    Europe
    Why not have it?
    even if you do not use it now, is an extra feature very useful: you can make corrections and estimate distances without a rangefinder.
    If i were u, i would like to have it.
    . Just my 2 cent
     

    308pirate

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Apr 25, 2017
    17,087
    24,082
    When he's 10 inches left and 9 inches low at 780 yards you can do one of the following:

    - Realize that you have no fucking idea what 10 inches looks like at 780 yards and give some random best guess that he then gets to do math with to try and figure out what the adjustment should be

    OR

    - Use the calibrated ruler that's in-front of your eye and tell him exactly, in the same measurements his scope is in, what his correction is without having to do any math on either your or his part


    You don't need to know his ballistics; trhe correction is the correction on his current ballistics, assuming you're both using the same system of MOA or MILS. 1 MIL still equals 1MIL regardless of the distance. Nothing is as fucking useless as a spotter telling me shit like 'hit below the target a bit' or 'it went to the right of the plate'.

    +1,000,000 this. Nothing is more fucking annoying that some dipshit trying to be cool by spotting when he doesn't know how to do it correctly.

    I'd rather be lost than listen to shit like the above in bold/yellow.
     
    D

    Deleted member 113831

    Guest
    I hate them. I won't have a spotter with a reticle. I am constantly trying to look around it. It isn't any great trick to give an instant correction in the appropriate angular unit of measurement, if you know the size of the target in that same unit of measurement. I don't want anything to hinder or distract me from spotting trace or splash.

    If anyone in the spotter optic industry gave a fuck about what I would want, I would tell them that I want a 2 mil circle right in the middle of the field of view and nothing else. That way you center the target in the circle and have an immediate 1 mil reference point from the center of the target no matter where the round lands and nothing to fuck up your view of the trace. But nobody is asking me, so I doubt I'll ever see it.
     

    Nittynate

    Sergeant of the Hide
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    Minuteman
    Mar 16, 2018
    216
    82
    look at the 85 mm Razor HD w/ new mrad ranging eyepiece and you have both options
     

    Backspace

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jun 29, 2012
    847
    99
    Florence, SC
    Specifically for shooting matches, you could mil all of the targets to determine their width in mils. Then set a strategy for your wind holds. Target size is not always given in a match. For example if you mil all of the targets and they are all .5 mil wide and your largest wind estimate is less than .5, you can hold edge all the way out and correct as you spot your impacts. Having a reticle to measure stuff has been helpful on lots of targets like big small troop lines, kyl racks,...etc. also helpful for setting a strategy in switchy fishtail or constantly varying wind speeds.