trident512789

Private
Minuteman
Sep 23, 2021
16
5
here
Doing my first hunt in many many year this fall. Basically I'm a first timer as the last deer I got was mid-80s. Need some guidance on how to prepare--I'm very much a data driven kinda person--so I've scouted out public lands in my area. --its Wisconsin Drifless Area (Hills with farms in the valleys) I have no idea "where to setup" or even what to look for. Last time I was told "sit here" and we had people every 50 yards or so (Deer are kinda thick) at the tree line watching over the cornfield. Now its just my old sorry butt in some nature preserve/park--small heavily forested hills or River/Swamp bottom.

None of my buds is crazy enough to go with me to show me the ropes (I don't think any of them ever hunted anyway).

From what I remember I'll need a rifle (duh), Sharp Knife, rope and of course winter clothing in official Packer Nation Blaze Orange. I've been you-tubing field dressing as I am 30+ years removed from my practice. We pulled the deer out on tracked vehciles/psuedo atv-pickup--I'm guessing I have to hike out so do I quarter it? Some article talk about skinning--last I remember we dropped it off dressed at the processor.

Advice/criticism wanted. I've been waiting all these years to get back home rather than spending 4k+ on a Deer Lease. If I can get going I got family who'd like to come along, but I gotta figure out my ass from a hole in the ground first.
 

wvfarrier

Ignorant wretch
Full Member
Minuteman
Dec 7, 2012
999
1,194
West (By GOD) Virginia
For "where" to sit, look for trails that lead in and out of bedding areas. On public land, you need to go deep into the area, get away from the heavily pressured grounds. I do not quarter, I have a game cart, roll the critter onto it, strap it down and head out. Of course, you wanna gut it first; take your time when gutting, just be careful and look at what you are slicing into. The biggest spots to avoid are the stomach (during the initial cuts), the intestines (especially the anus) and the bladder. As you stated, there are tons of videos but experience is the teacher. The best and most important thing you can do to be successful is to "sit down and be quiet".
 
Last edited:

db2000

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  • Mar 27, 2020
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    Have realistic goals. You don’t need a trophy buck. Great if you do but a doe will be good experience and taste even better.
     

    trident512789

    Private
    Minuteman
    Sep 23, 2021
    16
    5
    here
    For "where" to sit, look for trails that lead in and out of bedding areas. On public land, you need to go deep into the area, get away from the heavily pressured grounds. I do not quarter, I have a game cart, roll the critter onto it, strap it down and head out. Of course, you wanna gut it first; take your time when gutting, just be careful and look at what you are slicing into. The biggest spots to avoid are the stomach (during the initial cuts), the intestines (especially the anus) and the bladder. As you stated, there are tons of videos but experience is the teacher. The best and most important thing you can do to be successful is to "sit down and be quiet".
    Do you have a suggestion on the game cart? Its funny you mention "sit an be quiet" as that is one of my favorite memories of hunting is just being still in the woods waiting and listening. TYVM for you help
     

    wvfarrier

    Ignorant wretch
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 7, 2012
    999
    1,194
    West (By GOD) Virginia
    Do you have a suggestion on the game cart? Its funny you mention "sit an be quiet" as that is one of my favorite memories of hunting is just being still in the woods waiting and listening. TYVM for you help
    Mine is called the Hawk Crawler but there are less expensive versions. My buddy uses one he got off amazon for $90 and its held up pretty well
     

    rookie7

    Outdoorsman
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 26, 2009
    912
    197
    Georgia
    I am very fortunate that my father took me hunting and educated me on the outdoors when I was a boy.

    Here's my brief .02 on how to approach your season:

    1. Nothing is more important than time in the woods

    2. Food sources - examples - in the southeast in chronological order - browse, muscadines, persimmons, acorns, browse/grass

    3. During the rut - position yourself where you can see - and it's still Food sources - the does go to food and the bucks are cruising for does

    Even though baiting is legal now in Georgia - I don't - the white oak acorn is KING where I hunt.

    Safety -

    1. wear a whistle around your neck under your shirt - if you can breathe you can use it

    2. wear a full body safety harness if you are hunting elevated

    I hope you enjoy your season. Best of luck and be safe.
     

    RedTimber

    Jude 1:3
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 23, 2021
    182
    100
    In the Hollow
    To easily gut, make the cut just below the sternum and cut down to the genitals. Cut down both sides of the thorax at the pelvis away from centerline (these will be mostly pelt with light amounts of muscle attached that hinder draining). Remove everything inside the cavity, try not to puncture anything below the diaphragm.
     

    RedTimber

    Jude 1:3
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 23, 2021
    182
    100
    In the Hollow
    To easily gut, make the cut just below the sternum and cut down to the genitals. Cut down both sides of the thorax at the pelvis away from centerline (these will be mostly pelt with light amounts of muscle attached that hinder draining). Remove everything inside the cavity, try not to puncture anything below the diaphragm.
    To remove everything together, cut upwards through the sternum after making the initial cut. Then cut through the windpipe and pull windpipe towards you while standing below the hind legs. Everything will come out together, you may have to make small cuts to detach visceral tissue but there won't be many of those.
     

    roostercogburn98

    Crawling America, one mall at a time
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    Nov 3, 2010
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    If it’s your land, go out as much as you can before season even gets close. Find new places to sit and watch. They will show you where to be come season. A camera never hurt, I leave my cellular camera running year round. Once you find a place that has decent traffic, slowly start building your stand or blind. Once they get used to the change, they won’t think twice about moving like normal around it. I can sit in my old hog barn and watch deer walk right past me. That barn has been there since the late 70s and is commonplace to all the creatures by now.