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Ruger Precision Rifle Discussion

Hi, I’m brand new to precision shooting and know nothing at all.

I have a Ruger Precision Rifle in .308, all stock. I just ordered an Athlon Cronus Btr 4.5-29x56mm with a 34mm tube.

According to the Ruger website, my rifle has a “20 MOA Picatinny rail secured with #8-40 screws”.

Can anyone tell me what ring size I need and I’m open to reccomendations. I was highly considering Seekins. Thanks in advance!
I'd highly recommend the Burris Signature XTR rings. These have worked out great on both my PRP's. Their adjustability can be a big plus, depending on your scopes specs, to give your scope more MOA range. They're solid at keeping the scope in place with no lapping of the rings needed.

 
Keep in mind when that the optic rail is basically on top of the stock. If you go too low you will lose the comb adjustment.
What’s the comb adjustment?

Do you have a recommendation on brand and height? I’m leaning towards Seekins and ARC. I don’t want there to be marks on the scope and I want something easy to mount that won’t move.
 
the comb is the cheek rest, and the RPR like the AR needs a decent amount of rise in the scope mount because its basically level from the rail back to the cheek rest (not slanted down like a standard rifle stock).
 
The .308 RPR has a 20 inch barrel. Would a longer barrel improve it's range or is the .308 at it's max with a 20 inch barrel?
 
The .308 RPR has a 20 inch barrel. Would a longer barrel improve it's range or is the .308 at it's max with a 20 inch barrel?
A longer barrel would totally help… 26 is ideal for getting the most out of that round. That being said, 20” RPR to get into shooting an all around caliber like that is a great start. You’re still gonna be plinking steel at 1000yards with that. FYI.. I was doing it with an 18” AR10, so you should be fine. But, down the road, I can see the desire to make upgrades to get more out of the platform.
 
The .308 RPR has a 20 inch barrel. Would a longer barrel improve it's range or is the .308 at it's max with a 20 inch barrel?
I've had a 24" and currently a 26" barrel on my RPR .308. Longer barrels will give you more velocity for each additional inch out to 32" or so. What length of barrel and what contour to use depends on what you're tying to achieve (e.g. discipline/type of shooting and jus how much precision you want to go after).
 
I've had a 24" and currently a 26" barrel on my RPR .308. Longer barrels will give you more velocity for each additional inch out to 32" or so. What length of barrel and what contour to use depends on what you're tying to achieve (e.g. discipline/type of shooting and jus how much precision you want to go after).
Ordering a rifle barrel seems to be a lot more complicated than I thought. I am ignorant when it comes to the different terms and options available. Contour I understand somewhat. How it affects shooting out to longer ranges is unclear. I want to be able to hit steel targets at say 800 yds. If a longer barrel will aid in achieving that goal that's what I want.
 
Ordering a rifle barrel seems to be a lot more complicated than I thought. I am ignorant when it comes to the different terms and options available. Contour I understand somewhat. How it affects shooting out to longer ranges is unclear. I want to be able to hit steel targets at say 800 yds. If a longer barrel will aid in achieving that goal that's what I want.
Contour can have an effect because of weight a particular contour will have. For example, If one is hunting and having to hike around, a short light contoured barrel could be more advantageous than with a heavy contoured target type of barrel. A heavy contoured target barrel doesn't heat up as fast as a light pencil contoured barrel allowing for maintaining accuracy over a longer series of shots and tend to have a wider accuracy node that's easier to find.

Shooting steel out to 800 yds doesn't require a high level of precision and mostly likely, because of the weight of the RPR anyway, you're be using a front rest of some kind, so additional weight is probably not an issue. A "sporter barrel" contour, like what's already factory mounted can use some additional velocity shooting to that distance. I find the longer heavier barrels on my RPR works very well and there's really no difference in cost. There might be issues with heavier barrels with regard to what you might be mounting on the muzzle (e.g. a particular suppressor, break or tuner).

The Precision Rifle Blog website is a good place to get a lot of good information, if you're so inclined. Here's a writeup on some precision rifle barrels that you may find helpful and/or interesting:

 
Contour can have an effect because of weight a particular contour will have. For example, If one is hunting and having to hike around, a short light contoured barrel could be more advantageous than with a heavy contoured target type of barrel. A heavy contoured target barrel doesn't heat up as fast as a light pencil contoured barrel allowing for maintaining accuracy over a longer series of shots and tend to have a wider accuracy node that's easier to find.

Shooting steel out to 800 yds doesn't require a high level of precision and mostly likely, because of the weight of the RPR anyway, you're be using a front rest of some kind, so additional weight is probably not an issue. A "sporter barrel" contour, like what's already factory mounted can use some additional velocity shooting to that distance. I find the longer heavier barrels on my RPR works very well and there's really no difference in cost. There might be issues with heavier barrels with regard to what you might be mounting on the muzzle (e.g. a particular suppressor, break or tuner).

The Precision Rifle Blog website is a good place to get a lot of good information, if you're so inclined. Here's a writeup on some precision rifle barrels that you may find helpful and/or interesting:

Thanks. Talked with Greg at Southern Precision Rifles and am going to order a Bartlein barrel at 24 inches with the Remington Varmint conture. Not the least expensive but I am of the mindset "You get what you pay for" and I felt comfortable talking with him.
 
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Looking at TriggerTech's listing for their trigger that is "coming soon" they have two models:
Diamond Pull Weight: 1st stage: <4 to 20 oz / 2nd stage: <4 to 24 oz
Special Pull Weight: 1st stage: 8 to 24 oz / 2nd stage: 8 to 32 oz

For you guys that are looking at these triggers - what model are you going to buy?



I'm wonder if they will ever release this trigger ?

I don't see it listed anywhere on their website anymore. Hope it wasn't dropped.
 
Timney’s trigger is great and available now.. just saying.

if you’re stuck on a TT, then order the custom shop RPR, it comes with one.
 
Not sure where to post this, so I will put it here. There is a very interesting article in Shooting Illustrated titled "The Forgotten Factor". It discusses hitting targets at distance versus hitting targets for effect at long range. Good read.
 
Thanks. I will try each and see what happens. No matter which I buy they are expensive but that's ok. Now to get a suppressor.
I really do like the RPR .338 and almost picked one up. But with the availability of powder these days, I decided to go with a 6.5 PRC for its smaller case capacity where I can shoot more rounds per 8lb jug. :giggle:
 
Yeah. Rounds are about $5+ each, so not a lot of extra shooting. Bought 5 boxes of Barnes Precision Match 300 gr for $105 per box from Grab a Gun.
 
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Joke of the day (sorta). had a fellow on Facebook ask when the “new” Gen 2 RPR was coming out.

After much discussion, it was learned that he was interested in the Ruger American Generation 2. My Gen 2 RPR dates to 2017. In 6.5 Creedmoor, it was cutting edge then darned difficult to find and I was happy to have one. At that point, shot better than any rifle I had ever owned previously. For the street price, even today, it is the best bargain in good shooting rifles. (And the street price is just about what I paid 7 years ago.).
 
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Joke of the day (sorta). had a fellow on Facebook ask when the “new” Gen 2 RPR was coming out.

After much discussion, it was learned that he was interested in the Ruger American Generation 2. My Gen 2 RPR dates to 2017. In 6.5 Creedmoor, it was cutting edge then darned difficult to find and I was happy to have one. At that point, shot better than any rifle I had ever owned previously. For the street price, even today, it is the best bargain in good shooting rifles. (And the street price is just about what I paid 7 years ago.).
True all. And I have a Gen 1 that still shoots lights out. When someone talks about getting into LR its always where I steer them first. Are there better out there? Sure, but it is a great one to learn on IMO. Mine was born as a 308 but grew up to become a 6.5 CM
 
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Really thinking about picking up a Gen 2 6.5 creedmoor. Would that be a decent base rifle for me to get started in PRS?
Owned a Gen 2 for a long time. it was reliable and always capable of getting good hits out to 700-800 yards. (Never really had a range that offered more yardage) What it really needs is a solid rear buttstock, a better brake. May not take you to the AG Cup, but it won’t embarrass you either.
 
Really thinking about picking up a Gen 2 6.5 creedmoor. Would that be a decent base rifle for me to get started in PRS?
I started with one back in 2017. Shot it casually for a few years in PRS and it was definitely a step up from my other rifles. A couple years ago I wanted to get more into PRS so I upgraded to an Impact-Proof barrel-MDT chassis rifle and sold the RPR.

While there is some after-market support available for the Ruger (barrels, trigger, AR furniture), a rifle built on a Rem 700-pattern barreled—action is going to offer a lot more options to upgrade and grow with the rifle as your shooting matures and you get deeper into rifle games. Not that I think there’s anything wrong with the RPR, its just that there are better rifles on the market now than circa 2017-ish.
 
I started with one back in 2017. Shot it casually for a few years in PRS and it was definitely a step up from my other rifles. A couple years ago I wanted to get more into PRS so I upgraded to an Impact-Proof barrel-MDT chassis rifle and sold the RPR.

While there is some after-market support available for the Ruger (barrels, trigger, AR furniture), a rifle built on a Rem 700-pattern barreled—action is going to offer a lot more options to upgrade and grow with the rifle as your shooting matures and you get deeper into rifle games. Not that I think there’s anything wrong with the RPR, its just that there are better rifles on the market now than circa 2017-ish.
Your statement "there are better rifles than the RPR" raises a question. Does price equate to better? If you compare a RPR to a MRAD, is the MRAD 3 times the gun as a RPR, since it cost 3 times as much?
 
Your statement "there are better rifles than the RPR" raises a question. Does price equate to better? If you compare a RPR to a MRAD, is the MRAD 3 times the gun as a RPR, since it cost 3 times as much?
“Better” covers a lot of ground. I wouldn’t put it only on cost.

Based on my experience, the stock RPR barrel was capable of .5MOA (.75-1 was more common) but I could never get it to shoot better than that, even with hand loads. The trigger was OK, but it needed something better. Balance was butt-heavy when shooting off barricades, and I found the rear stock to be uncomfortable. Muzzle brake was Meh but much better once I switched to an A419. I also added a keymod Arca rail to the fore end to have a flat surface and ability to position the bipod wherever I wanted it. I could have kept it, but I would have had to change out a bunch of components to make it better (26” bbl, upgrade the trigger, change out the buttstock, mlok fore end to be able to add weights). But at the end of the day I was still limited to the proprietary Ruger action/receiver which meant further upgrades or ability to adapt it into something that fit me better was limited. So I bailed when the bbl had about 1/2 it’s life left and was sellable.

I replaced the RPR with a semi-custom build. Impact action, Proof comp contour barrel, TT trigger, A419 brake, MDT ACC chassis. Yeah, it cost 2-3x more but it’s a way better shooter (.3xx to .5MOA is common) AND being a Rem700 pattern there is a ton more after-market support. Best part, it was easy to get balanced, and my ability to shoot off positional barricades went way up. Over the holidays I finished a second rifle based on an Origin action, Proof barrel, TT trigger, A-419, and currently it’s sharing the same MDT chassis while I wait for my XLR to be delivered. The Origin build was a little cheaper than the Impact, but still more than the RPR. I just finished doing load development and it’s shooting much better than the Ruger (in stock form) ever did.

Long story short, you could get a RPR, but IMO there are better options out there. I will say shooting the RPR revealed to me what I was looking for in a precision rifle and what I wanted it to have, so there’s that. I don’t have any regrets getting the RPR, its just that I would have had to dump a bunch of money into it to get it to do what I wanted -which led me down the path of the Impact build, and eventually the Origin. YMMV
 
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It seems there is a certain amount of luck associated with buying an RPR. Unlike some other folks, my all stock 6.5 CM typically shoots .5 MOA or better and often .2 - .3. (personal best is .17). I don’t use a brake as it seems unneighborly as the range I shoot at can get busy, but recoil isn’t bad. My trigger is adjusted to its lightest setting which, for me, may be a bit too light as I yip it now and then. The stock can be rather annoying to adjust, but is comfortable once I get it right.
I’ve never had a bit of trouble with it. Overall, I find it to be an excellent rifle and recommend it.
Now if I could only find an inexpensive case that allows me to fold the stock…
 
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It seems there is a certain amount of luck associated with buying an RPR. Unlike some other folks, my all stock 6.5 CM typically shoots .5 MOA or better and often .2 - .3. (personal best is .17). I don’t use a brake as it seems unneighborly as the range I shoot at can get busy, but recoil isn’t bad. My trigger is adjusted to its lightest setting which, for me, may be a bit too light as I yip it now and then. The stock can be rather annoying to adjust, but is comfortable once I get it right.
I’ve never had a bit of trouble with it. Overall, I find it to be an excellent rifle and recommend it.
Now if I could only find an inexpensive case that allows me to fold the stock…
Mine equaled yours. It really challenged my MPA production in accuracy. The MPA, when the nut behind the trigger was right, was capable of low .3’s with an occasional high (very high) 0.2’s. My second Gen RPR could get into the 0.3’s and did so many times.

Now I am hardly the best, but the 6.5 MPA was far and away the most reliably accurate rifle I ever owned. I’ve since rebarreled it and the newer barrel may be as good. However, these days, when I get one dialed in, I quit shooting groups and get on with the project of enjoying hearing steel ring.

IMG_1219.jpeg
 
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Mine equaled yours. It really challenged my MPA production in accuracy. The MPA, when the nut behind the trigger was right, was capable of low .3’s with an occasional high (very high) 0.2’s. My second Gen RPR could get into the 0.3’s and did so many times.

Now I am hardly the best, but the 6.5 MPA was far and away the most reliably accurate rifle I ever owned. I’ve since rebarreled it and the newer barrel may be as good. However, these days, when I get one dialed in, I quit shooting groups and get on with the project of enjoying hearing steel ring.

View attachment 8324871
What stock is on the RPR?
 
Shot my RPR .338 Lapua today for the first time and I must say it is a blast (no pun intended). The recoil is a lot less than I expected and seems to be very accurate. My last shot was dead on bulls eye. The three previous shots were all overlapping each other but were a little high and left. Made the necessary adjustments and it was good. The range is only 100 yds. A couple of negatives were the magazines would not insert smoothly and when cycling the bolt the new round occasionally would not load. Looking forward to going out to 800-1000 yds.
 
Shot my RPR .338 Lapua today for the first time and I must say it is a blast (no pun intended). The recoil is a lot less than I expected and seems to be very accurate. My last shot was dead on bulls eye. The three previous shots were all overlapping each other but were a little high and left. Made the necessary adjustments and it was good. The range is only 100 yds. A couple of negatives were the magazines would not insert smoothly and when cycling the bolt the new round occasionally would not load. Looking forward to going out to 800-1000 yds.
 

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Makes me wish I had the cash to pay my layaway off, I found what I consider to be the "unicorn" rpr at a good price, the discontinued .243win. From what I've read they have an odd twist rate for .243 and like the heavier bullets, but it's my favorite cartridge and I've wanted that rifle since they were first introduced, luckily my local gun shop loves me and ordered it in for me on a phone call. Anyone have one in .243 and have a pet load you like? I'd like somewhere to start once I get it home. I'm no competitive shooter or anything so if I can pull decent groups at a couple hundred yards I'm happy, might turn out to be my pronghorn gun if I ever need that 500yd+ shot.
 
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If anyone is interested, I got a reply from Ruger about barrel nut torque. 150 ft lbs. No wonder it is difficult to remove.
To continue the saga, I bought the LRI barrel nut tool and a barrel vise and that stupid nut will not loosen. Part of the problem is a vise I bought will not clamp the barrel tight enough. I am going to send the barrel to Ruger.
 
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To continue the saga, I bought the LRI barrel nut tool and a barrel vise and that stupid nut will not loosen. Part of the problem is a vise I bought will not clamp the barrel tight enough. I am going to send the barrel to Ruger.
I used a Viper barrel vise and it clamped plenty tight enough to remove my Ruger barrel. That barrel was a beeotch to get off though. Judicious application of heat along with a stout cheater bar and a dead blow hammer did the trick. I heated the barrel, not the receiver. Think they used a thread locker. I installed a WOA Wilson barrel in 6mm Creedmoor and it shoots every bit as well as the factory barrel, if not better.
 
I finally got the barrel nut loose and installed the new barrel. Used the LRI barrel nut wrench and a good heavy hammer. Whacked the wrench a few times and it popped loose. Got the rifle put back together with the headspace set. Now the only thing is, with all the handling and trying different things, the finish on the receiver is rubbed off in spots. Functionally it is good but cosmetically looks like crap. How can I get that refinished?
 
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I finally got the barrel nut loose and installed the new barrel. Used the LRI barrel but wrench and a good heavy hammer. Whacked the wrench a few times and it popped loose. Got the rifle put back together with the headspace set. Now the only thing is, with all the handling and trying different things, the finish on the receiver is rubbed off in spots. Functionally it is good but cosmetically looks like crap. How can I get that refinished?
Cerakote it. @Short-bus will take care of it
 
I finally got the barrel nut loose and installed the new barrel. Used the LRI barrel nut wrench and a good heavy hammer. Whacked the wrench a few times and it popped loose. Got the rifle put back together with the headspace set. Now the only thing is, with all the handling and trying different things, the finish on the receiver is rubbed off in spots. Functionally it is good but cosmetically looks like crap. How can I get that refinished?
I had to give the barrel nut wrench a good whack with a heavy rubber mallet to break it loose. It only took me one whack and the nut came off just fine. I made sure I put some Loctite copper Anti-Seize lube on the theads of the new barrel and ever since, there's been not issue getting the barrel nut off.
 
Any new build or barrel switch I always use a copper anti-seize lube. But I always brush the threads out to rid it of the crud or milling waste that gets in there. Brush ++ anti-seize = install and removal being much smoother
 
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First time shooting the .308 after the barrel change and I am truly impressed. Sub MOA at 100yds. Now to a longer range to see how it does at 500-600.
 
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Took both my RPRs to the local 600 yd range yesterday. I have a .308 with a new 24 inch Bartlein barrel and a .338 Lapua. First time for either rifle past 100 yds. The .338: Let's just summarize real fast. 600 yds is easy. The .308 is stupid fast to the target at 300 yds. 400 yds was pretty easy and didn't try much at 500. They are a lot of fun.
 
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One of the cam arms on the cocking piece of my RPR broke during a class last weekend.

Is the AD Arms replacement the go to part or is there another brand that is better?