Swedish FM 23-36 "trials" target rifle

Calfed

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Last year, I noticed this at an auction. Initially, I thought it might be some kind of sporterized hack job, but found that it is actually a rare FM 23-36 Swedish

http://dutchman.rebooty.com/fm36.html











Crown Jewels, the bible for Swedish Mauser collectors, has a small section devoted to it

 

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Forgetful Coyote

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Very very nice Mr Calfed! As I said in a earlier thread, your next acquisition should be FFV67! ?

Somewhat ahead of its time ie detachable mag precision rifle in '67.. honestly wouldn't really look too terribly outta place even today in a practical precision match. And I'd take it over a 'Nam M40 every day a the week & twice on Sunday considering its 6.5x55 vs .308 Win(or did USGI M40's use a 7.62x51 NATO chamber @pmclaine ??). I think there were other caliber options for the FFV67 as well, admittedly I've only skimmed thru the linked thread below. But either way dont get me wrong tho, I got just as big a spot in my heart reserved for the OG 'Nam era M40 as any one, and'd be ecstatic w/ either!

https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?354210-Carl-Gustaf-Sniper-rifle-FFV-67
 

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Calfed

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Very very nice Mr Calfed! As I said in a earlier thread, your next acquisition should be FFV67! ?

Somewhat ahead of its time ie detachable mag precision rifle in '67.. honestly wouldn't really look too terribly outta place even today in a practical precision match. And I'd take it over a 'Nam M40 every day a the week & twice on Sunday considering its 6.5x55 vs .308 Win(or did USGI M40's use a 7.62x51 NATO chamber @pmclaine ??). I think there were other caliber options for the FFV67 as well, admittedly I've only skimmed thru the linked thread below. But either way dont get me wrong tho, I got just as big a spot in my heart reserved for the OG 'Nam era M40 as any one, and'd be ecstatic w/ either!

https://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?354210-Carl-Gustaf-Sniper-rifle-FFV-67

That is a great looking rifle. You are right, it would look great at any target match.
 

USMCsean

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The FM23-36 was ahead of its time as well. The reinforcing to the receiver was a wonderful idea. But due to restrictions of using a service rifle for competition, they had to drop the strengthening feature.
 
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USMCsean

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I must say I've watched you for the good part of a 6-7 years grab some nice pieces at auctions.
 
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Calfed

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Care to elaborate?
The FM23-36 used a special receiver made in 1935 that had larger side rails and omitted the thumb relief cutout for the stripper clip...

The CG 63 and other Swedish Mauser based target rifles used a regular Swedish Mauser action.FM23.3.jpgFM23.4.jpgcg63.jpgcg63a.jpg
 
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Forgetful Coyote

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The FM23-36 used a special receiver made in 1935 that had larger side rails and omitted the thumb relief cutout for the stripper clip...

The CG 63 and other Swedish Mauser based target rifles used a regular Swedish Mauser action.
Oh wow now that you said something I see it, didnt even notice that before. Do you know what the bottom of the action looks like? Is it still standard Mauser style square bottom with the screwed down recoil lug?
 
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Calfed

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I haven't looked at the bottom of the receiver, but the bottom metal looks similar.

This is the small write up in "Crown Jewels", the bible for most Swedish Mauser collectors.FM23.1ajpg.jpgGB6 FM23-36.jpeg
 
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USMCsean

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If I recall correctly, the receivers were actually regular m/96 receivers that were reinforced, so you can see on his example above that @Calfed has, you can see where the indentation where the thumb cutout was, and now it's solid. If you pull the bolt back, you'll probably see something that indicates the reinforcement.
 
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Forgetful Coyote

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Okay, I asked a buddy who has one and from looking at his, and talking with him, these were purpose built receivers, not receivers that were reinforced.
Do you or he know what the bottom of the action looks like? Standard Swede screw locations? If they made an entirely new receiver for it, it seems to me they'd also be smart to change the shape of the bottom eg: keeping the integral lug but making it more closely resemble a Kelbly Panda - completely flat bottom for better bedding, etc..
 

Random Guy

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Per the reference book, The Crown Jewels, all of the fm/23-36 trials rifles have receivers marked 1935, and utilized a "newly made, stiffer receiver without the thumb cut." (pages 174-176). The serial numbers shown in the book are 1031 and 1072. Only 500 of the experimental rifles were made. Just an fyi.
 
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Calfed

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Per the reference book, The Crown Jewels, all of the fm/23-36 trials rifles have receivers marked 1935, and utilized a "newly made, stiffer receiver without the thumb cut." (pages 174-176). The serial numbers shown in the book are 1031 and 1072. Only 500 of the experimental rifles were made. Just an fyi.
The first 89 of the fm23/36's were numbered 1001-1089. There are different theories about the numbering scheme used on the other ones
 

KAIFS

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Midwest, USA!
and then there is a 'unicorn' #501 FM/23, made in 1943 special blueprinted model with a double set trigger. Was for years in a collection of Steve Kehaya until transferred hands about 2years ago and now in a private collection of a couple in Midwest... Swedish FSR rifles for sure are fascinating...