The OFFICIAL Sniper's Hide black powder / single action revolver thread.

Blue Sky Country

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  • Another obvious visual difference between the Dragoons and the Walker, is that the Walker didn't have a latching loading lever.

    Yep. Instead of a retaining latch, the Walkers, Dragoons, and newer Patersons that were retrofitted with loading levers had a single leaf spring inside the lever recess that kept the lever flush against the barrel. However, upon the recoil of firing the weapon, the lever is still prone to flipping downward. Sometimes the plunger will wedge itself into a chamber and lock up the gun when the shooter tries to cock the gun for a next shot. Not a good situation to be in when you are facing a band of hostiles on the gallop and have to react instinctively.

    The modern reproductions of these pistols also exhibit these characteristics. Many new shooters think that it is a manufacturer's defect but they actually reflect the design flaws that went into the early Colt revolvers. The earliest production runs of the 1836 Paterson even had fully exposed nipple faces enclosed by the cylinder wall outside. There was no metal barrier separating each individual nipple. If the shooter had not sealed the capped nipples with tallow or grease beforehand, upon the first shot, flame and hot gas blowback from the chamber being fired was prone to racing across the entire rear of the cylinder and setting off all of the other chambers at once, causing the cylinder pin itself to be pulled loose and the bewildered shooter left holding just a handle and a smoking frame in his hands. Colt quickly learned from this issue and all subsequent revolvers had each chamber nipple isolated in it's own three sided recess that opened outward to allow easy capping.

    Many period shooters as well as reenactors/competitors having to deal with the unlatched loading levers of the Walkers and Dragoons often employ a piece of twine or elastic band. One of the things I made in significant numbers for "Walker fixes" was a simple U-clamp bent from a piece of thin flat stock that went over the barrel and the loading lever and secured under the barrel with a bolt and wingnut. I sold a good number of these at N-SSA and CWSA shoots. Now, full loads from these big guns would not flip the lever down and jam the works.
     
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    acudaowner

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    Dec 26, 2018
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    a very nice looking piece I got my uberti reproduction Remington1858 navy conversion not because Its the most reliable or best at anything mostly just to fart around with don't have the money or an original 6 gun of that period but its fun enough to shoot from time to time and have a laugh with at the range thank god i don't have to rely on speed with it cause changing the cylinder is a production compared to just dropping a mag and loading another It's just a quick fix that was needed from watching all those old western movies when i was a kid but I love it all the same .
     
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    Blue Sky Country

    Urban Cowboy
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  • a very nice looking piece I got my uberti reproduction Remington1858 navy conversion not because Its the most reliable or best at anything mostly just to fart around with don't have the money or an original 6 gun of that period but its fun enough to shoot from time to time and have a laugh with at the range thank god i don't have to rely on speed with it cause changing the cylinder is a production compared to just dropping a mag and loading another It's just a quick fix that was needed from watching all those old western movies when i was a kid but I love it all the same .

    Gotta be quick on the game bro!



    Even I cannot do it that fast. The main thing that will hinder your efforts to reload in this fashion is the 'getting the cylinder back in' part. The key is to exert just enough pressure with your thumb on that hammer so the protruding cylinder ratchet and the cylinder locking bolt is withdrawn into the frame and allows you to slide the new cylinder in. I can change a cylinder much faster with my 1851 Colt Navy though. The barrel wedge seats firmly with just one click and it comes off with thumb pressure. The rest of the gun instantly breaks down into three parts and goes back just as quickly. Seriously though, a Remington 1858 reproduction from any company is a rugged and downright hard hitting piece of equipment. There are literally only 3 moving parts in that firing mechanism, and they pack enough power for any defensive use and medium to borderline large game hunting and then some. Load up a '58 with 35 grains of Olde Eynsford and a .454 ball, or 30 grains of OE and a 240 grain Kaido lubed conical and you will have equal performance to a .357 Magnum. That is A LOT of fucking gun in a package that is more or less $250...
     
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    Gustav7

    Son of a Gun...
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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    Gotta show some love for the single actions. First one I ever had was a Cimarron .22, which I actually hated. When my old man's place got broken into and his whole gun safe stolen (crazy story), that pistol was stolen with it. I had always wanted another single action, and bought a Ruger blackhawk in .357 about 2 years ago. Had that for probably close to a year and just didn't like the handling of it. Picked up a basically unused New Ruger Vaquero off armslist. 5.5" barrel, color case hardened which I believe is the older versions of the NEW Vaquero, and the owner had put custom grips made out of a specialty wood that looks like ivory. LOVE this gun, can't say enough things about it. My light load for it is 2.8-3.2gr of either Titegroup or Clays out of it. 650fps

    IMG_4331.jpg

    IMG_4332.jpg
     

    Old_Longhair

    Crazy Ol' Foole
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    Nov 13, 2018
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    My biggest beef with all Ruger transfer-bar guns, is that they all suffer from rotten timing that drops the cylinder bolt way out in front of the ramp. Properly timed it wouldn't land until the ramp, and you wouldn't have to live with that ugly cylinder ring.
    It can be changed, but it's a time consuming pain in the butt. I know, because I've done it. The one thing that can't be changed has to do with the relation of the bolt to the loading gate, which unfortunately causes you to drop the bolt between the locking recesses when you close the loading gate.

    Most people would be happy enough to just dramatically reduce the effect w/o having to change the timing, which can be accomplished by polishing the bolt to a mirror finish, but care must be taken to NOT round over the edges.
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    My biggest beef with all Ruger transfer-bar guns, is that they all suffer from rotten timing that drops the cylinder bolt way out in front of the ramp. Properly timed it wouldn't land until the ramp, and you wouldn't have to live with that ugly cylinder ring.
    It can be changed, but it's a time consuming pain in the butt. I know, because I've done it. The one thing that can't be changed has to do with the relation of the bolt to the loading gate, which unfortunately causes you to drop the bolt between the locking recesses when you close the loading gate.

    Most people would be happy enough to just dramatically reduce the effect w/o having to change the timing, which can be accomplished by polishing the bolt to a mirror finish, but care must be taken to NOT round over the edges.
    I'm correct in saying this is purely an aesthetic issue right? Not denying it but just trying to understand that it doesn’t effect longevity or functionality?

    I guess cylinder ring has never really bothered me. But I can see how it would, especially if you’re used to not having it
     

    Old_Longhair

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    Nov 13, 2018
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    I'm correct in saying this is purely an aesthetic issue right? Not denying it but just trying to understand that it doesn’t effect longevity or functionality?

    I guess cylinder ring has never really bothered me. But I can see how it would, especially if you’re used to not having it
    Eventually it could cause sufficient wear to both the bolt and cylinder to be an issue, but it would take many thousand rounds, and realistically most people will never shoot their guns enough to experience it.
    I do highly recommend polishing the bolt. That alone will dramatically reduce the wear factor.
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    Eventually it could cause sufficient wear to both the bolt and cylinder to be an issue, but it would take many thousand rounds, and realistically most people will never shoot their guns enough to experience it.
    I do highly recommend polishing the bolt. That alone will dramatically reduce the wear factor.
    You are using the word "bolt"...and I'm not sure exactly which part you're referencing. I don't see the term bolt in the Vaquero schematics. I know what a bolt is in every other type of firearm...but a little confused as to what the bolt would be on a single action?
     

    Old_Longhair

    Crazy Ol' Foole
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    Nov 13, 2018
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    You are using the word "bolt"...and I'm not sure exactly which part you're referencing. I don't see the term bolt in the Vaquero schematics. I know what a bolt is in every other type of firearm...but a little confused as to what the bolt would be on a single action?
    It's the part that latches the cylinder in the "ready-to-fire" position. The part that contacts the cylinder that causes the ring.
    Sorry, I'm using Colt terminology for the part. It's been around longer than whatever Ruger calls it.
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    It's the part that latches the cylinder in the "ready-to-fire" position. The part that contacts the cylinder that causes the ring.
    Sorry, I'm using Colt terminology for the part. It's been around longer than whatever Ruger calls it.
    ok I assumed that what you meant but figured I’d ask.

    Would love to maybe have a Colt some day. For now, Ruger fits my wallet a little better. Thanks for the input
     
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    myronman3

    deez nuts
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    Mar 24, 2017
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    Gotta show some love for the single actions. First one I ever had was a Cimarron .22, which I actually hated. When my old man's place got broken into and his whole gun safe stolen (crazy story), that pistol was stolen with it. I had always wanted another single action, and bought a Ruger blackhawk in .357 about 2 years ago. Had that for probably close to a year and just didn't like the handling of it. Picked up a basically unused New Ruger Vaquero off armslist. 5.5" barrel, color case hardened which I believe is the older versions of the NEW Vaquero, and the owner had put custom grips made out of a specialty wood that looks like ivory. LOVE this gun, can't say enough things about it. My light load for it is 2.8-3.2gr of either Titegroup or Clays out of it. 650fps

    View attachment 7297281

    View attachment 7297282
    Love that holster.....you make that yourself?
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    Love that holster.....you make that yourself?
    I wish! No I have not gotten into leather work yet. I actually bought this off Ebay, from a guy who makes holsters on the side. Eventually I want to get him to make me another holster and belt done in the same fashion to match.
     

    Unknown

    Gunny Sergeant
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    Sep 17, 2009
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    Many years ago my wife and I went for a drive out in "the country" and found an estate sale, so we stopped. I found a brand new in the original box from COLT, an unfired Colt (not a reproduction) second generation 1860 Army revolver. It looked like it had never even had the cylinder turned, but with an estate sale, I would never know... In any event, it was a good enough price that we took it home. For the past many years, it has just sat at the back of the vault.

    Every once in a while I think maybe I might shoot it, but it has been this long without ever being fired that I think I'll just let it sit in the box. Still has all the original paperwork, although the box does show wear...

    In all my years of shooting, I have never fired a black powder firearm with black powder. I have shot a number of black powder era firearms, but always with reduced modern powder loads.
     
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    Unknown

    Gunny Sergeant
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    Sep 17, 2009
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    If you are referring to the NIB Colt 1860 Army, I'll be happy to send you some if you email me...I always have trouble trying to post photos to this site. Emailing you some photos is easy though. We originally bought it partially because of it's price, and partly because my wife's Great Grandfather was a cavalry trooper during the Civil War from a Vermont unit..Got arrested and paroled....twice. She wanted it in his remembrance, but has lost interest in it over the years and now no longer is interested in it.
     
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    PBWalsh

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    Feb 10, 2017
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    Just click the “Attach files” box down below the comment field. If doing it from a phone, just add the picture from the camera roll. From a computer, just drag and drop from the control panel.
     
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    Blue Sky Country

    Urban Cowboy
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    Minuteman
  • On the upper right side of the reply/post panel there is a button that looks like a framed picture of a sun and two mountains. That is your image loader. It will give you two options when clicked, load image via URL or upoad from your hard drive. Click on hard drive option and your device folder will appear automatically for you to select a file. Once it is uploading, select "Insert full size image" and it should show up in your post.

    HINT: When saving image files to your device, rename the files with identifiable keywords and numbers so it makes it easier to find that image among the other ones when the device folder appears. Hope it helps...
     

    Gustav7

    Son of a Gun...
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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    Ohio (OH)
    Started shooting more single action, and hopefully this Fall shoot an actual SASS match. Its pretty damn fun.

    Picked up my second pistol, an Uberti Cattleman Hombre and have a few hundred rounds through it now. DEFINITELY not the same quality as the Ruger, but its still fun to shoot. The trigger is actually much nicer than the Ruger, although both have Wolff spring kits so that helps, but trigger on the Uberti is now around 2lbs, and the Ruger 3lbs.

    Worst part is the area where the firing pin protrudes through frame is softer metal. The floating firing pin hits the frame are there and starts to smush metal out into the cylinder area. I've had to file it twice now, and the 2nd time I did a minor chamfer job on it. Kind of annoying but hey, its not the nicest single action out there as well. I'd love to get a more high end Pietta with the transfer bar system sometime.
     

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