Wiggys sleeping bags

mi223

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Feb 14, 2017
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I am looking to upgrade my sleeping bag and have been researching what is popular. I am seeing very little about wiggys. I always thought they was top of the line It looks as if synthetic bags are completely undesirable now days. I realize they come with a weight penalty but the wiggys bag is the cheapest made in the USA Bag I have found. I have been eyeing a western mountaineering or a stone glaciar but they are outrageously expensive and I honestly won't use it all that much.


Weight
Quality
Cost

You can have 2 of the 3. Am I getting quality and lower cost with the wiggys bag?
 

Castloader

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Dec 25, 2013
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I’ve had one for about 10 years. It is heavy, but dang it works. I’ve woken up after being snowed on. The snow was sitting on the bag where it hadn’t slid off, completely unmelted and powdery. I was snug as a bug. This was with a double bag plus bivy sack. Wiggy’s is both heavy and bulky. I think it works so well because of how lofty the insulation is. The thing that makes it hard to compress guarantees that you’ll be warm.


Hope this helps.
 
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Charger442

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    love a wiggies bag. used it in my own house when the power went out for a week last years. soft, self contained, warm, portable.
     

    Kwe1982

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    Aug 16, 2013
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    I’ve got one, like stated above it’s heavy but extremely warm, I’m not trekking into the mountains with it, so weight isn’t a big issue for me.

    Zippers to work well, only complaint I have is it doesn’t compress that well into the stuff sack.

    It takes a little while to get it put away.

    Other than that I like it.
     

    OREGUN

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    What are you using it for? Wet or dry environment? In a tent or on the ground or in the snow? Are you willing to carry a liner and or cover (bivy sack) of any kind? Is compressibility important (does it need to pack small)? How is it shaped? How are you shaped? Can you tolerate a slim cut mummy bag or will you sleep better with a more generous cut for your hips, shoulders, etc? Car camping, rafting, desert backpacking, Alaska backpacking, mountaineering, hunting in the late fall above 5000 ft, through hiking the AT, multi-day adventure racing….all get their own sleep system considerations.

    There are some great sleeping bags out there. Synthetic fill is bulkier for the same insulation than down. Every time you compress synthetic, it loses some loft and thus insulating ability. However, synthetic will stay warmer in wetter environments, over time, as everything gets wet.

    Down compresses smaller and recovers better from compression. If you get down wet, it stops working. Improvements to waterproof fabrics make the moisture issue less of a concern than in the past but it’s a thing. Especially if you expect to get rained on for days in a row.

    You can get away with less insulation if you use a liner. Likewise, a bivy sack. However, if the bivy sack is cut small and compresses the insulation, it can actually have the opposite effect.

    What kind of pad are you carrying? That makes a difference too.

    Good gear is expensive. You get what you pay for so decide what you need and pay for it. Western Mountaineering, Feathered Friends, Wiggins, Enlightened equipment, Warmlite, hell, even Wenzel is made in the USA. I have sleeping bags for high altitude mountaineering, for car camping, for summer backpacking and for team sleeping with my favorite naked friend. Each is different and specialized and was chosen for different reasons.
     

    Alpine 338

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    Jun 26, 2010
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    I have a couple, and one of them is a zero rated bag that I used at zero degrees in a survival class. My feet still got cold, and threw my jacket over the bottom of the bag, which solved the problem. Note, I did get frost nip on my toes years ago from another survival class where we lived on the snow for 6-days, so my feet are more susceptible to getting cold now.

    I think many manufacturers over-rate their products, where the Wiggles bags are closest to an honest rating.

    They are well made, but as mentioned above, they are heavy, so that's a consideration if hauling one on your back through the woods.

    I think the falling out of synthetic bags is because of the weight, where ultralight backpacking is the rage. Unfortunately, ultralight often equates to less durable.
     
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    mi223

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    What are you using it for? Wet or dry environment? In a tent or on the ground or in the snow? Are you willing to carry a liner and or cover (bivy sack) of any kind? Is compressibility important (does it need to pack small)? How is it shaped? How are you shaped? Can you tolerate a slim cut mummy bag or will you sleep better with a more generous cut for your hips, shoulders, etc? Car camping, rafting, desert backpacking, Alaska backpacking, mountaineering, hunting in the late fall above 5000 ft, through hiking the AT, multi-day adventure racing….all get their own sleep system considerations.

    There are some great sleeping bags out there. Synthetic fill is bulkier for the same insulation than down. Every time you compress synthetic, it loses some loft and thus insulating ability. However, synthetic will stay warmer in wetter environments, over time, as everything gets wet.

    Down compresses smaller and recovers better from compression. If you get down wet, it stops working. Improvements to waterproof fabrics make the moisture issue less of a concern than in the past but it’s a thing. Especially if you expect to get rained on for days in a row.

    You can get away with less insulation if you use a liner. Likewise, a bivy sack. However, if the bivy sack is cut small and compresses the insulation, it can actually have the opposite effect.

    What kind of pad are you carrying? That makes a difference too.

    Good gear is expensive. You get what you pay for so decide what you need and pay for it. Western Mountaineering, Feathered Friends, Wiggins, Enlightened equipment, Warmlite, hell, even Wenzel is made in the USA. I have sleeping bags for high altitude mountaineering, for car camping, for summer backpacking and for team sleeping with my favorite naked friend. Each is different and specialized and was chosen for different reasons.
    Lots of questions I don't have answers to but lots of good things to think about.

    I am doing a hunt on an island this fall. We will be dropped off and picked up 7 days later. There is no calling it and going to a hotel. Temps shouldn't be terribly cold but below freezing is to be expected. We are planning on a 4 mile hike in then setting camp. Obviously lighter the better but I don't plan to haul this thing around from day to day and I am In good enough shape to manage 4 miles.

    I need a pad as well so I would take recommendations there as well
     

    Farmerhunter

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    Jan 11, 2020
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    I have two seasons on one and I like it. Definitely a little heavier than some but well made. I agree that the temp rating is true to what they say. Happy with the purchase
     

    greentick

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    Feb 20, 2021
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    My Western Mountaineering Ultralite was just under $400 when I bought it in 2008 and it's my favorite piece of backpacking gear. IIRC it's rated to 20 but I've gone to single digits in just silkweights (I sleep warm). Still works the same, spread out over 14yrs it's not a bad investment.

    AFA pads. I started with inflatables but having spent a night on the ground in near zero after one decompensated I moved away from them. Just paranoid, ymmv. If I'm sleeping on the ground I like a z-rest. If I'm planning on sleeping in an AT shelter I will probably bring a 3/4 z-rest and double them up or just suck it up. If you're going to be sleeping on a cot, you will need at least a CCF pad for insulation.

    I have a bunch of UL gear for backpacking but probably don't meet the "criteria" for UL as I like to bring some luxuries.

    ETA: put dry socks on when you climb in the bag, you're feet will be much warmer.
     
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    OREGUN

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    I like the old school, rolled closed cell foam pads…the RidgeRest has always been my favorite for backpacking. They used to make a thick model that was great if you were on snow. I’ve also carried a thick and a 3/4 length for extended stays on snow high in The big mountains. Inflatable options are better now than when they first came out with the Thermarest but there’s nothing like a leaky pad to ruin a night/trip.…if size and weight are No concern, a Paco Pad is pretty mutch the tits for comfort. They are huge. More for rafting.

    Based on your info above, I’d be looking for a 20* synthetic fill bag. In a compression stuff sack, it will get small enough to pack easily, it’s a good trade off between weight and size and warmth. At that temp rating, manufacturers will let you pick a big rectangle instead of strictly mummy options, if you like to sleep legs-akimbo. You won’t have to worry about down if it rains for three days straight.

    Go to someplace like REI and check out the pad options. The insulating properties of a good pad cannot be overstated. A half inch of foam between you and the ground will do more to keep you warm than an extra pound of insulation in the sleeping bag. If you go with inflatable, take a repair kit. If you do foam, get a stuff sack to cover it so if you lash it to the outside of your pack like a wayward boy scout and then thrash through the brush, it doesn’t get all torn up.
     

    grinnergetter

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    Use a Wiggys for going on 16 years used primarily for hunts that include a cabin. No complaints other than occasional zipper issues in the middle of the night.

    Tent or otherwise Montbell in a mummy style has been to Alaska a few times, once on Kodiak (rained for 3 days straight). Never got wet or cold....great bag!,
     
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    mi223

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    Well I ordered a zero degree bag. It is supposed to deliver tomorrow. I figure for 185 it can't be that bad. I took advantage of the mil surplus colors they had at a discount. Would like to try it out yet this spring. Watching for one of the last frosty nights this spring.
     
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    mi223

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    Well my wiggys back showed up on the door door step.

    First impressions, it is big and lofty. Maybe a little heavy. I don't have anything good to compare it with for weight. Material seems durable and construction quality seems great.

    The website said something along the lines of 20 days to ship because everything is made to order. Mine shipped in just a few days.

    I think I did good other than I got a 10% off email this morning.
     
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    shields shtr

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    I spent many a cold ass night in a tent this fall when I drew a mountain goat tag. I bit the bullet and went with a Western Mountaineering Kodiak bag. Holy Shit, what a difference. I have a ton of different bags, and this one absolutely destroys all the others. I had to have lightweight, so that was a big factor for me. I do have a Wiggy's bag as well, it has been relegated to my camper as more of a comforter now. It is a decent bag though, especially for the money.
     

    pmclaine

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  • Nov 6, 2011
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    Ive had a Wiggys for twenty odd years now, went with the bag inside a bag version.

    At some points in the night the bag may fit a little tight but I cant recall being cold in it.

    Used it for motorcycle touring and hauling into the woods with a SXS so weight was never a factor.

    One thing I love is the "drape" of the fabric. It just "feels" better than any other bag I have used. Weird that that would be the feature I key on.

    Agree sometimes doing the zipper it will pull in some material and in the dark it can be tough to clear. Just part of the feature of backing up an air infiltration point with fabric. Dont try to force things and it will clear pretty easily. Have a falshlight near your pillow.
     

    Enough Said

    Staff Sergeant Taylor
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    I opened a retail store in 2005 in Anchorage, AK called Wiggy's Alaska.
    Sold them for 16 years then the owner pulled the carpet. His customers were coming to me because of his arrogant attitude.
    Great bags and used to be a whole line of jackets and parkas but he cut the inventory drastically under Covid.
    Can't go wrong with a Wiggy bag.
     
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    acudaowner

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    just pull the covers over your eyes and pray for death wake up with 4 inmates all snuggling you to keep warm and one of them using you as a squishy toy .😱. sorry could not find a pic of that so I just went with this one .
     

    Ravenworks

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  • Feb 8, 2019
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    I am looking to upgrade my sleeping bag and have been researching what is popular. I am seeing very little about wiggys. I always thought they was top of the line It looks as if synthetic bags are completely undesirable now days. I realize they come with a weight penalty but the wiggys bag is the cheapest made in the USA Bag I have found. I have been eyeing a western mountaineering or a stone glaciar but they are outrageously expensive and I honestly won't use it all that much.


    Weight
    Quality
    Cost

    You can have 2 of the 3. Am I getting quality and lower cost with the wiggys bag?
    Take 20-30 minutes to read about him and how he evolved.

    The man was genius.



     

    brianf

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    as for bag temp ratings, there is small print

    you are supposed to be wearing proper undergarments for the temperature, most sites or bag reviews have that information

    a zero degree bag doesnt mean "5F and boxers"