2 person sleep system

mi223

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So I recently ordered a floorless tipi and have convinced my wife to do a short weekend backpack trip with me. She is not totally against roughing it but she is definitely just playing along to make me happy.

With that being said I am trying to put together a decent sleep system for the 2 of us. My main concern is comfort followed by weight and cost. I need to keep this affordable. If I suggest buying a 400 dollar quilt, she will be out. Weight is also somewhat important. I will be carrying the majority of the load and she will carry a smaller backpack with some support equipment. Again this is my idea and she is just playing along so suggesting she carry her share is not gonna happen. Besides I need the training for my hunting trip in October.

So far I think I found a 2 person air mattress that is on the heavy side but not to bad considering it is for 2 people. I do have 2 cheaper sleeping bags we can use but I am thinking I can save some weight by going to a shared bag or quilt. I have been trying to buy made in USA lately but probably not gonna happen in this situation.

Open to any segestions. Do I buy another sleeping pad or go to an air mattress for a few pounds more.

This will be a base camp style trip also. Carry camp in around 3 miles then hike around from there. Lighter the better but 40 lbs for 3 miles won't kill me. Getting 2 people's gear in a pack will be as much issue as anything
 

Keeper22

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I also prefer a sleeping pad also, I have back issues and an air mattress causes me issues. Good on your wife for giving it a try.
 

OREGUN

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    Unfortunately, my advice is to chuck the budget and get whatever will keep momma happy. It’s like skiing with kids…the first few trips are about not being miserable so they will go again.

    If I’m backpacking with a snuggle-buddy, in temperate climates, I want a shared sleep system. You’ll stay warmer, it’s cozy, hell, you might even get laid. Cheap sleeping bags can often be zipped together but they usually weigh a ton. Fancy sleeping bags can often be zipped together if they are the same brand. My problem with a quilt is that, like a floorless tent, you still have to carry a bottom layer. But there is no denying that a quilt is light as hell. If you are going someplace warm and dry, I’d recommend a pair of lightweight down sleeping bags that can zip together. Since they will be down and light, get square cut so you have some wiggle room. “Mummy” bags can zip together but it’s overkill in a warm climate and it makes a weird udder shaped thing.

    There are pads that either zip together or come with straps to make a double. Klymit makes good pads (in the USA, I think). Worth a trip to REI (I know, commies bad) to try out some different shapes and styles.

    Go light. Depending on the expected temps and how good you are at managing food (and her willingness to pack austerely) I think you’ll be lucky to keep it to 40 pounds. Have fun.
     
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    hlee

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    If you are sleeping on the ground, air mattress. The thicker the better. No matter how well you clear the area, you will have sticks and rocks jabbing you all night long. And, if either of you are side sleepers, no sleeping pad is thick enough to keep your hips comfortable. But, an air mattress will suck all of the heat out of you. You still need a bottom layer- between you and the mattress. There are some air mattresses made with insulation to help prevent that, but they are expensive- like fancy ultralight sleeping pad + fancy ultralight sleeping bag expensive. My brother in law turned me on to hammock camping, and if I am going anywhere with trees, I’m sleeping in a hammock. Top quilt + bottom quilt (actually I have a down insulated single person air mattress just in case the situation dictates that I must sleep on the ground) no rocks or sticks jabbing me in the back. I am still learning to sleep on my back (side sleeper) but I sleep better than on the ground. My setup weights less than an equivalent single person set up on the ground, but there is no economy for multiple campers- and no snuggling.

    If your wife is just humoring you, back the bus up just a bit and car camp. You can still use all of your stuff, with the benefit of wheeled transport right at camp. Being 3 miles back with a wife that doesn’t really want to bet there sounds like the opeing scene of a Lifetime movie. But, if you must hike in, ditch the budget.
     
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    OREGUN

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    I should clarify that I use the term “pad” as a catch all term for whatever you sleep on. I’m a closed cell guy myself because its indestructible, insulates well, and is reasonably light. There are “hybrid” foam and air pads and pure inflatable pads. Jacks plastics Paco Pads are like oversized wrestling mats that are really comfortable but only go car camping or rafting because they are heavy (like pounds each). A lot of the fancy ultralight stuff now is inflatable with some foam in it…the evolution of the old therma-rest pads of the 90s.

    I’m a side sleeper so I end up with a rolled up jacket between my knees to keep the hip/knee angle more comfortable. Even with that said, I’ve never found an inflatable or hybrid model that I found particularly comfortable unless it was WAY to big to carry anywhere.

    I have hundreds of nights on one of these (or sometimes a stack of two of them in really cold/on snow situations). They are cheap, I’ve never had one deflate, I’ve used them as a camp seat, a splint, a floaty, a “get your stove up off the snow” pad, etc. Slide two of them next to each other and voilà-a double.

    https://www.thermarest.com/sleeping...t-classic-sleeping-pad/ridgerest-classic.html

    Also, check websites like Steep and Cheap for good deals on random stuff like pads.
     

    hlee

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    The reason for the hike is doubling as a scouting trip for a hunting trip in October
    Camp at or near the trail head. Dayhike/scout from there. In the grand scheme, 3 miles isn’t that far, but still further than most hunters venture from the trailhead. Start your day an hour earlier and you can be anywhere you want to be, and you can leave without packing out the camp. You can still carry whatever you want, but your wife won’t need to carry that but what she needs for the day. Plan to rough it in the tipi, but pack a double width air mattress with electric charger in the vehicle- just in case.
     
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    Landon4

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    Me and my wife use a sleeping pad that’s about 1/2” thick and individual air pads that are around 2” thick. We just had a 4 day trip on the river a few weeks ago it was pretty warm and we each just used a lightweight down blanket that rolls up to be about a 4” diameter by 8” long, we were comfortable with that. We were also in a flourless tent with a 2 person nest.
     

    Hattrick

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    If it’s trees were your going check out a portable Hamic’s
     

    Butterburger

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    I have a Big Agnes Big Creek 30 degree double sleeping bag and it's really nice. It's designed so that you slide your sleeping pads into the sleeves at the bottom of the bag, so they don't move around on you.

    My wife is always cold and used to bring a 0 degree bag for herself, even in the summer time. With two people heating this 30 degree bag, she says she sleeps warmer in this one than she does in her cold weather bag.
     
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    n2ishun

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    I've slept on the ground probably more than any 5 normal people.
    You have 3 choices.
    Bring a garden rake to make it smooth enough to not have a miserable night (just picking over the area by hand does not work, if you try, you'll find out).
    Bring an air mattress.
    Bring a cot.
    That is it....these are no other choices (save hammock which relies on having 2 trees at correct distance large enough to support your weight).
    Air mattress is the only real option, but bring a battery powered pump, you'll definitely be needing it to both inflate and deflate afterwards.
     

    acudaowner

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    have more kids they will tire you out you'll be able to sleep anywhere . That or they will drive you to an early grave either way you'll get the sleep your looking for . lol
     
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    mi223

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    After a bunch of looking I found that klymit sells factory seconds and refurbished items on ebay. I was able to get a refurbished double bag that is a synthetic bottom and down top that weighs 5lbs and a 2 person pad that weighs 3 pounds. It was just over 300 for both. So with pad, bag and tent I should be right around 15lbs for a 2 person sleep system. As long as the bag is decently warm we should be in good shape.
     
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