Angled vs straight spotting scope

Tokay444

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    My guess is you’re gonna hear a lot of, “it’s personal preference.”
    Without pretending to know everything there is to know about the inner workings of optics, but know a bit about a bit, I would THINK it would be easier to produce a clearer image without making it bounce around a corner. That’s not to say it can’t be done, but as we know, in optics, everything comes at a price.
     

    LostInTranslation

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    My guess is you’re gonna hear a lot of, “it’s personal preference.”
    Without pretending to know everything there is to know about the inner workings of optics, but know a bit about a bit, I would THINK it would be easier to produce a clearer image without making it bounce around a corner. That’s not to say it can’t be done, but as we know, in optics, everything comes at a price.
    That is fair...

    My question is mainly about ergonomics/convenience - I've never owned scope thus unsure what works best in prone/bench positions.
     

    Cardboard Assassin

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    I debated this recently as I was buying a spotting scope.

    From the prone position angled is the better option (which is the opposite to what I figured when I started to look at spotters).

    For bench shooting either will work.

    I ended up buying a Swarovski which is modular so if I really didn't like the angled I could sell the module and buy the straight eyepiece instead.
     

    theLBC

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    i shoot by myself, and so i put my cellphone on my spotter to record.
    with the angled spotter, i can turn the spotter on its side so the screen can face me instead of up, while the spotter is to one side.
    of course, this means you need a spotter than rotates inside the mounting ring. even some inexpensive ones do that.
     

    Denys

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    My guess is you’re gonna hear a lot of, “it’s personal preference.”
    Without pretending to know everything there is to know about the inner workings of optics, but know a bit about a bit, I would THINK it would be easier to produce a clearer image without making it bounce around a corner. That’s not to say it can’t be done, but as we know, in optics, everything comes at a price.
    Yeah, I don't think that's a thing. The angled eyepiece model uses a prism to "erect" the image and change it 45 or 90 degrees. The straight eyepiece model will also have an erector. These are spotting scopes, not telescopes.
     

    obk

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  • May 19, 2020
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    I like angled for general use, but would probably go with a straight model if it was 'work' oriented. Easier to quickly get on target. The little sighting rail on the angled Swaro scopes makes up for a lot of that though. If you do go angled, it's important (imo) to be able to adjust the mounting ring. Lets you run it with the angled eyepiece going off to the side instead of up. With a digiscoping adapter you can have your phone display everything and it ends up being pretty slick for stationary targets.
     

    ghostrider272

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    I started with a straight and moved to an angled. Both have their advantages. I'm going to stick with the angled as a find it easier for multiple positions.
     

    stemikel

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    I have the same thoughts as ghost. I started straight and moved on to angled. I spot myself
     

    BAMCIS

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    Most High-power National Match shooters use angled.
    With a good , mount you can rotate the scope to where you are comfortable in any position to shoot.
     

    theLBC

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    Not sure about these other guys but I started straight and stayed straight.
    i go both ways :p
    i have a cheap but surprisingly decent 20-60x80 angled scope and a 12-40x60 compact spotter.
     

    427Cobra

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    When I shot F-Class I used a angle spotter from the prone position, when I stopped shooting F-Class I sold it, my Razor spotter is a straight one, and when I get a Swaro it will be straight
     

    cmush

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    I personally run angled. Lots of glassing for critters while hunting. I personally have a lot less neck strain and can work the rotating ring to let me view a lot more area without having to move my body or the tripod. Once you've run it a bit you can get pretty good at knowing where it is pointing and getting on target.
     

    Burdy

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    Man, I understand the neck strain aspect of angled and all the other pros, but I can't find anything on the move to save my life inside one. #1 reason why mine are all straight. I guess best case scenario is to have one of each depending upon use case.
     

    Rancid Coolaid

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  • Aug 10, 2007
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    Are you planning to be prone, sitting, or standing more?
    Winner, winner.

    This isn't a conversation about image quality, it is about usability. And usability is all about spotter's position. I've used both, I like both; however, in some instances, one simply doesn't work, given the shooting situation.

    What someone uses in competition doesn't mean much to me when I am spotting game across a ravine from a prone position, with my pack as the rest. Then again, what I use spotting game across a ravine probably doesn't matter to that competition shooter either.
     

    LuvDog

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    I always used angled, so that's what I've stuck with.

    Its easier to use prone. I did pick up a cheap straight scope recently, but haven't tried it. I think it will be nice to use with my son because we just shoot off a bench.
     

    pmclaine

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  • Nov 6, 2011
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    Adding my opinion....

    My first spotter was angled. I was primarly shooting prone, in a sling, cross the course style. My scope stand matched that useage allowing me to move the scope from prone to sitting to off hand heights.

    It was great because I could shoot turn my head and not totally blow position.

    Initially finding your target in the eyepiece is weird....takes most standard IQs about 3 minutes to figure it out.

    I now shoot a straight scope, much of my shooting being off the bench seated, Its a lighter setup, less cumbersome.

    If I were hunting, scanning for animals I would want straight figuring I would be keeping a low profile and I quickly want to get my lens on target to observe movement or such.

    That said.....if I am setting up online to observe a shooter I want angled because I am going to sit on a stool, Ill put the objective on target with the angle pointing up and I could watch all day with very little neck strain as my head will be leaning down, neck in a neutral position, elbows on knees, head supported in hands just looking through the occular.

    You could almost get the same straight with most comfortable position being standing natural with scope at exact eye height so there is little neck tension. Doing that though you are subject to the wind creating some scope shake or you should weight the tripod to counter it.

    Lower is better in most cases.

    Perhaps you need both.

    Otherwise expect that either will have its advantages and disadvantages.
     

    rope

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  • May 25, 2007
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    Some really great info above. I have both and agree with the above, once you nail down your use and what may be on the horizon the choice will be more clear. When on the range either will do. In the field is where that starts to change. If your on level ground either will work any more than a few degrees off flat ground the angle starts to shine. A good tripod can start to level the playing field to a point.

    I have a Mark 4 TMR and a angled Swaro 20x50x65. More often I use the Swaro, it cuts the mirage better of the two.
     

    hlee

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    I’ve ROed a couple of 2 day PRS events. Lots of glassing, some of it traversing from one target to another, for shooters that can get VERY bent out of shape if you miss something. My spotter is straight, but there were some angled spotters on the line too. I also elk hunter with my BiL a few years ago where he had his angled spotter and I had my straight one. In both cases, the angled spotter proved to be more comfortable to use. An angled spotter also needs subtly less tripod height.
     

    Litshoot

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    I've used both and for shooting I prefer the angled. Prone, standing sitting, rifle, pistol, on a stand, or even a pistol box the angled is much more comfortable and let's you not break position. Slow fire prone I was able to get my position so well together that even with follow through I could watch the traces of my 223 at 1000 yds. Really helped me keep my speed up to not lose the wind.

    Straigh it nice when your sitting back lazily spoting/scoreing for someone.
    The most important feature j find is a way to pivot the scope in the mount so the angle can be up or sideways more.
    Ps spotting or scoring a shooting stool and bad posture the angle scope is comfortable and good.
     

    StLPro2A

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    For long distance targeting shooting - what are better straight or angled spotting scopes?

    Thank you
    I find angled to be more flexible in various spotting applications. Spotting steep angles uphill is easiest with angled. Some find locating the target more difficult with angled until they become experienced with angled design. Generally, straight requires scope to be physically higher in relation to ground raising issues of being seen by target and stability in winds and uneven ground. My old neck gets strained more with straight. I have both. Use straight for standing/seated spotting horizontal and downhill. Angled for prone/uphill applications. As with most decisions........personal preference and wallet driven. In making your first spotter selection, try before you buy. Most scope owners will gladly allow you to try their spotters and share their thoughts. Great way to make new friends.
     

    rope

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    Angled or straight doesn't matter they both catch snow and rain. What's more usable, comfortable, packable?
     

    hafejd30

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    Depends what my use is. For fclass we use the angled spotters. More comfortable when sitting. For hunting I like straight. Usually using from prone position when hunting. I find I can acquire the target/animal faster with a straight eyepiece.
     

    Rhed

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    I wanted to use both of my eyes to spot. Especially spotting for a few hours sitting on a stool . So didn’t have a choice when I went with a swaro BTX90.
     

    carbonbased

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    Hey, what about an eyepiece that can change angle! Optically stupid? Unfeasible to manufacture? I dunno.
     

    theLBC

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    i'm glad the forums have come to a consensus! :ROFLMAO:

    the answer is if your spotter is always going to be on a tripod, angled gives many more options.
    for the field where size and speed of target acquisition counts, and you might not use it mounted, a small straight spotter is ideal.
    so the answer depends, and the correct answer is both.
     

    LostInTranslation

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    I find angled to be more flexible in various spotting applications. Spotting steep angles uphill is easiest with angled. Some find locating the target more difficult with angled until they become experienced with angled design. Generally, straight requires scope to be physically higher in relation to ground raising issues of being seen by target and stability in winds and uneven ground. My old neck gets strained more with straight. I have both. Use straight for standing/seated spotting horizontal and downhill. Angled for prone/uphill applications. As with most decisions........personal preference and wallet driven. In making your first spotter selection, try before you buy. Most scope owners will gladly allow you to try their spotters and share their thoughts. Great way to make new friends.
    This is a good advice - I wish I could follow it... Nowadays with COVID scare I have been reluctant to ask to touch anything not mine - mainly because of respect to others :(