Maggie’s  Differences in aviators

4thHorseman

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Naval Aviator

On a carrier, the Naval Aviator looks over at the Catapult Officer
("Shooter") with his 20/40 vision who gives the run-up-engines
signal by rotating his middle finger above his head. The pilot pushes the throttle forward, verifies that all flight controls are operational, checks all gauges, and gives the Cat officer a brisk salute with his middle finger, continuing the Navy/Marine tradition of asking permission to leave the ship. The Cat officer drops to one knee while swooping his arm forward and pointing down deck with his middle finger, granting that permission. The pilot is immediately ejected while the plane is catapulted and becomes airborne.

Air Force Pilot

We've all seen Air Force pilots at any air force base look up just before taxiing for take-off, and the ground crew waits until the pilot's thumb is sticking straight up. The crew chief then confirms that he sees the thumb, salutes, and the Air Force pilot then takes off. This time-tested tradition is the last link in the Air Force safety net to confirm that the pilot does not have his thumb in his mouth or up his ass.

Army Aviator

If you've ever seen an Army helicopter pilot preparing for
takeoff, you will note that the pilot gives the ground guy a thumb up before he is given hover and takeoff signals. There are two theories about the origin of this gesture. One is that it is to show that the pilot has identified which of his fingers is the thumb so that he will be able to properly operate his controls. The most compelling theory says
that this is to show the ground crewman that the pilot indeed knows which direction is up
 

barneybdb

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  • Dec 2, 2011
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    Re: Differences in aviators

    As an ex Royal Australian Air Force member who was seconded to the Royal Australian Army when they were given control of rotary wing assets I totally agree with the previous post except we never saluted as they left, we would return the thumbs up or use another hand gesture depending on the crew.
     

    Kinsman

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    The pilot is immediately EJECTED while the plane is catapulted and becomes airborne.
    EJECTED? WTF?
     

    Wanderlust

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Ejected-meaning thrown from the carrier deck, the pilot and the plane. Another way of saying catapulted.
     

    cmh2007

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    Aug 13, 2009
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    Re: Differences in aviators

    well, army pilots are actually decended from airforce pilots
     

    Killer Spade 13

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    If you can't hover, you can't fly.

    I'll just say this, many a time I've landed a helicopter in places that when you looked up at the sky, you couldn't see it. If you ever run across one of us balding old farts, ask what a "hover down" is.

    And remember, helicopter pilots don't wear parachutes. And if we do have to hit the ground, Army and Marine pilots know which end of a weapon to put against the shoulder.

    "If you ain't Cav, you ain't shit!!!"
     

    Yasherka

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  • Jun 3, 2009
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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Rotary-wing pilot's definition of a fixed-wing pilot:

    Someone who once professed an interest in learning how to fly, but never really followed up on it.
     

    Killer Spade 13

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Back when I had hair and a moustache:

    img1301.gif


    Damn, I was goodlooking !!!!!
     

    Wanderlust

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">If you can't hover, you can't fly.

    I'll just say this, many a time I've landed a helicopter in places that when you looked up at the sky, you couldn't see it. If you ever run across one of us balding old farts, ask what a "hover down" is.

    And remember, helicopter pilots don't wear parachutes. And if we do have to hit the ground, Army and Marine pilots know which end of a weapon to put against the shoulder.

    "If you ain't Cav, you ain't shit!!!" </div></div>

    I never liked helicopters because there's a fair probability that the bottom part will get going around as fast as the top part.

    — Lt. Col. John Wittenborn, USAFR

    If helicopters are so safe, how come there are no vintage/classic helicopter fly-ins?

    Hovering is for pilots who love to fly but have no place to go.

    Real planes use only a single stick to fly. This is why bulldozers & helicopters — in that order — need two.

    — Paul Slattery

    Flying helicopters is like masturbation, you enjoy it while it's happening but you're kind of embarrassed when your done.


    Helicopters are really a bunch of parts flying in relatively close formation; all rotating around a different axis. Things work well until one of the parts breaks formation.

     

    Wanderlust

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Fine then, why is an airplane better than a woman?

    You don't need to pull out to eject. =)

    An airplane does not get mad if you 'touch and go.'

    An airplane's cockpit is cleaner.

    An airplane will let you use your dip stick anytime you want.

    When flying, you and your airplane both arrive at the same time.

    Airplanes don't mind if you look at other airplane's, or if you buy airplane magazines.

    It's always OK to use tie downs on your airplane.
     

    pdogsbeware

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Can't we all just get along!? ha Just because your an ass man doesn't mean you can't like boobs too, right? haha

    I'm a fixed wing guy but I will never pass up a chance to go for a spin in a rotary contraption. It never fails to amaze me, the things they can do. If only their operating costs weren't so high...
     

    Killer Spade 13

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    Yeah, Pdog . . .

    Kept my ticket current until a few years ago. $400/hr for rental is a wee bit rich for my Scottish blood.
     

    Wanderlust

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    WOW, $400/ an hour? I think an R22 runs about $260/hr wet out here, man glad I'm not a rotor head.

    That being said, if the Gov will pay for me to cross over to rotors after commercial rating I'm down for it.
     

    maxpower220

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    In the Navy, it's called a helo.

    In the Air Force, it's called a whirly bird.

    In the Army, it's called a chopper.

    In the Marine Corp, it's a jar head pointing up to the sky, going "uh, uh, uh!".
     

    Matt.Cross

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    Re: Differences in aviators

    One of my former employers owned a Robinson R44 Astro and he'd occasionally install the copilot controls and let me take over. He used to tell people who'd never rode in one that the main rotor was "just a big fan to keep the pilot cool. If you don't believe it, make it stop and watch him sweat!" His other favorite saying was, "Don't worry, if anything happens up there, it will take the rest of your life before we hit the ground." He was a kinda twisted guy who like to fart in the very small cockpit once you got to altitude.