Dry torque or use locktite on scope rings

_Will_

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Jan 11, 2022
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If a manufacturer recommends dry torque on scope rings, do you still use locktite? I did some research on here and other places and it seems it's split 50/50. Apparently wet torque can change the torqueing value putting a scope tube at risk. What's the general consensus here?

I have a Warne XSKEL cantilever mount and they recommend dry.
 

6.5SH

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Who specifies dry torque for rings?
If someone truly did and a threadlocker was still needed, one of the wicking versions made for something that is already assembled would be the answer.
 

_Will_

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Screenshot_20220303_185644.jpg
 

6.5SH

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Interesting reason, but if they specifically called it out like that I'd think it was from first hand experience.
I'd suggest a thin strip of painters tape just forward of the assembled ring. If things start to slip you will at least have an easy visual indicator.

If you decided to ignore their instructions, simply placing the screws into cap first, applying a drop to the other end of the threads away from the cap, then holding the cap away from the base as you started the threads and wiped anything that accumulated on the flat of the bottom half of the ring would avoid their scenario.
 
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BuildingConceptsllc

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    If you were worried about it, you can just lessen the torque value by 5 lbs or so and go right ahead with the blue lock tight. I use locktight on just about everything with my rifle. I don't want to be wondering if something has come loose. I've never had any issues at all. That said, Warn says that it's an issue of their steel threaded inserts backing out, so I assume if that happened you could just use red locktight and screw them back in right?
     
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    BigJohn141

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    Interesting reason, but if they specifically called it out like that I'd think it was from first hand experience.
    I'd suggest a thin strip of painters tape just forward of the assembled ring. If things start to slip you will at least have an easy visual indicator.

    If you decided to ignore their instructions, simply placing the screws into cap first, applying a drop to the other end of the threads away from the cap, then holding the cap away from the base as you started the threads and wiped anything that accumulated on the flat of the bottom half of the ring would avoid their scenario.
    I always put small witness marks on the scope body with a pencil. One just in front of the rings to see if it moves forward and one where the rings come together to see if the scope twists. It says on just fine and wipes right off when needed.
     

    trob

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    Who specifies dry torque for rings?
    I dont know that I've seen any companies recommend using loctite in the last 10-15 years (of the ones I've used). I generally use badger and vortex/seekins precision rings.

    Are there actually companies that recommend Loctite?
     

    6.5SH

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    I dont know that I've seen any companies recommend using loctite in the last 10-15 years (of the ones I've used). I generally use badger and vortex/seekins precision rings.

    Are there actually companies that recommend Loctite?
    Not so much loctite but wet torque.