Fieldcraft Good info. for backpacking

Eric B.

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Take a look at "Backpacking Light" and "Trailspace" for good discussions on lightweight backpacking equipment. Ther ae many other backpacking websites but these and "Backpacking Lightweight" are among the very best.

Granted some of the equipment is so lightly constructed that it would be unsuitable for bushwhacking but most is fairly durable. Ex. My REI Cruise UL 65 backpack (65 liter capacity) is light but very durable. It's been drug over granite in the high Sierras and Rockies and through sandstone squeezes in Uta's canyonlands and still looks good after several years of use.

On the other hand some equipment discussed on these sites is expensive but very useful, like my Trail Designs' Caldera Cone Sidewinder with ESBIT burner. (It can use ESBIT, alcohol or, with the Inferno insert, wood). It's very light being made of roll-up titanium sheeting and it all (but the alky burner) fits into the 3 cup pot it was made for. Now I can carry 1/3 less ESBIT fuel due to the Sidewinder's efficiency. Several pot/stove sizes are available.

If the Army Rangers' motto is "Travel light, freeze at night." then the lightweight backpacker's motto would be "Travel light sleep well at night."
 

Redmanss

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Re: Good info. for backpacking

I don't think so guys. Looks like a new user trying to provide some good info for those new in backpacking, which based on his screen name and profile is probably a passion of his. Spammers have links to sales crap, this guy just has info and other his other posts are on weapons.

Litehiker, welcome to the Hide.
 

threetrees

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Re: Good info. for backpacking

hrm. light is fine as long as it fulfills its function. last time as was at the askja caldera (iceland) we got into a sandstorm with its peak time at about 0300 in the morning. when we decided to pack up at about 0500, there were only 2 other tents besides ours standing. 5 others had all their poles broken and turned into flapping, semifunction bivouac sacs.

so 'travel light' with a grain of salt.
 

Eric B.

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Re: Good info. for backpacking

@ 3trees> Yep, "light", as I said in my OP, should not mean fragile. Fragile = unreliable in my book.

And as "Red" said, I just put the site name out there as info. Probably many members here do not keep up with the big changes happening in backpacking these days. I have absolutely no monetary interest in these sites or equipment dealers.

But if you look at some of the civilian gear different special forces have used you'll see that, over the years, it has affected the design of new militery gear. Often special forces types choose light gear because they go out many days unsupported and must shave ounces. But that gear must be reliable.

Seven years ago I carried a 7.5 lb. Dana Designs Terraplane pack. Tough and big but made more for mountaineering than normal backpacking. (I don't need a crampon protector patch on my pack's lid.)Now the Terraplane is used only for backcountry winter ski trips because it's big enough to carry my bulkier winter gear.

Around 2005 I saw "the light" on the sites I mentioned and thus my REI UL 65 summer pack weighs only 3.4 lbs., to give an example. Also my tent, a one man silnylon Tarptent Moment, only weighs 27 oz. with 2 aluminum stakes. Not bad for a tent that will withstand 60 mph. gales. My previous solo tent weighed four pounds and was smaller!

I'm a backpacking and hike leader in the 'Vegas area so if you have questions about any piece of backpacking gear or clothing I may be able to help. Also, as a former Nordic ski patroller in Pennsylvania I taught winter survival classes to two ROTC cadet units, including insertion via Chinooks to our winter bivouac/tactical training areas. So I can answer a lot of questions on winter camping as well.
 

kraigWY

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Re: Good info. for backpacking

Nothing says you have to freeze while traveling light. I spent many of nights in sub zero temps while in the Alaska National Guard with a pack that didn't weight much more then 30 lbs. I used a NorthFace Down bag that was good for 50 below or better. A light weight one man tent that weight about 7 lbs.

I also carried a MSR white gas stove, small coffee pot and a GI mess kit. I also carried pre-mixed flour for making pan bisquts, coffee, and instant oak meal. All carried in the old Vietnam Jungle Ruck.

I had an arctic canteen (USGI) that I put coffee in in the morning, and again at the noon stop. Always had hot coffee.

Went on a 100 mile Cross Country ski trip with nothing more then the above. You'd be supprised how light you can go and still be comfortable.