Help me diagnose a shooter error

elmuzzlebreak

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Oct 15, 2018
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Okay hide, trying to isolate some bad habits and need some help.

I have an issue with consistently breaking shots high. This is pretty evident when I dry fire because I can see the reticle jump up about .2 each time I break a shot. Any input is greatly appreciated.

Thanks hide.
 

Dthomas3523

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  • Jan 31, 2018
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    If the reticle is moving up as/after you break the shot, you’re likely relaxing and the butt is falling down.

    Position building and natural point of aim work is in order.

    Also, make sure you’re the one supporting the butt of the rifle and NOT the bag if using a rear bag. The bag is for minor adjustments, not full support.
     

    elmuzzlebreak

    Gunny Sergeant
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    Oct 15, 2018
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    If the reticle is moving up as/after you break the shot, you’re likely relaxing and the butt is falling down.

    Position building and natural point of aim work is in order.

    Also, make sure you’re the one supporting the butt of the rifle and NOT the bag if using a rear bag. The bag is for minor adjustments, not full support.
    Sounds good so do you think raising the buttpad a bit may help?
     

    Jack Master

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    Aug 7, 2018
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    Okay hide, trying to isolate some bad habits and need some help.

    I have an issue with consistently breaking shots high. This is pretty evident when I dry fire because I can see the reticle jump up about .2 each time I break a shot. Any input is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks hide.
    These fellas have you going in the right direction. The rear bag is the main culprit here. What bag are you using? is it sand filled or fluff filled?
    Other things that could add sight movement is heavy down pressure with your cheek weld or your breathing pattern when you break the shot. If you are not breaking the shot at the bottom of your breathing you'll have inconsistencies in impact heights. I also think if you get to the bottom of your breath and you relax different then normal you'll see some changes as well. Too much relaxing.
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    Too much of your upper body is being supported by your shoulders and elbows, Muscular tension. Shift most of your weight to your core, keeping your shoulders and elbows relaxed and light. Dry fire see what happens.
    When shifting your weight to your core, for me, is where the bottoms of my ribs meet the concrete. One "adjustment" I make right before getting on the trigger is to re-relax the shoulders and make sure I have not been lazy with my back muscles.

    Its impossible to relax all your muscles, so the muscles working would be your back and back of the neck correct?
    Then relax the shoulders, cheek weld(but not a lot of pressure), pull back straight with 3 fingers on firing hand, make minor adjustments with rear bag(steady reticle), squeeze trigger on bottom of breath cycle....
     

    elmuzzlebreak

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    Oct 15, 2018
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    @Jack Master , right now I am using a rear bag from warhose development (traveller bag). Pretty generic size and fill squeeze bag. At my range the 100 yd target when prone requires me to be pretty low to the ground otherwise I'd be sending rounds into the ground. I think you might be on to something with the cheek weld.

    @Gustav7 Thanks for that info. I'll make sure I work on that, especially the pulling back on the rifle.
     

    isofahunter

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  • Jun 11, 2010
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    Its impossible to relax all your muscles, so the muscles working would be your back and back of the neck correct?

    Yes, I used to support myself with too much shoulder and arm muscles which leads to the relaxation and high shots at distance. I hug my rifle now and in doing so I lift my elbows which shifts the support to my back and away from my arms and shoulders. Credit to @CalylenW who's online training made the light come on and made me a much more consistent shooter.
     

    Gustav7

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  • Jul 18, 2019
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    @Gustav7 Thanks for that info. I'll make sure I work on that, especially the pulling back on the rifle.
    Another key to pulling back with the firing hand to to pull straight back. This will take some practice as it’s not simply “pull back”...it’s pulling back a specific way that pulls the rifle into your shoulder but doesn’t move the reticle. I’m still making muscle memory out of this but if you stare at your reticle and pull back with that hand, and the reticle moves left or right, then you’re not pulling straight back.

    Personally, when I pull back, it’s like I’m slapping the grip with an open hand, as opposed to pulling on the grip like a rope. The former doesn’t move the reticle, the latter moves it to the right. When you shoot, and your hand is forcing the reticle to the right, you’ll start getting horizontal stringing, or at least I did(and still do some).