Gunsmithing  Howa gunsmiths

DWilson

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May 14, 2017
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I have a howa/vanguard i'd like to true up an rebarrel. I would like to compile a list of gunsmiths who work on the howa action since its metric threads an most dont wanna deal with it. With this list i'd like to pick a smith to work on my action an to help other howa owners choose. Thanks for any help or recomendations!
 

RSCOT

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Feb 29, 2012
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The only person I would recommend for this is Mark Gordon @ short action customs. I had him build a 280 on a smith & wesson branded 1500 (Howa). I supplied the action, stock, bartlein 3b, and had Mark do the build which included truing (bolt lugs, reciever face, lug abutments and bolt face). The rifle turned out beautiful and is solid 1/2 MOA with factory and less with handloads.
 

DWilson

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May 14, 2017
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The only person I would recommend for this is Mark Gordon @ short action customs. I had him build a 280 on a smith & wesson branded 1500 (Howa). I supplied the action, stock, bartlein 3b, and had Mark do the build which included truing (bolt lugs, reciever face, lug abutments and bolt face). The rifle turned out beautiful and is solid 1/2 MOA with factory and less with handloads.
Thank you for the recommendation. I assume he also recut the metric threads to the bartlein threads?
 

Sig Marine

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Dec 29, 2013
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Robert Synder also works on rifles with metric threads. I don’t have his contact information in front of me but Google RW Synder Gunsmithing and he will come up. He is also a member here on the Hide
 

natdscott

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Jun 13, 2008
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Thank you for the recommendation. I assume he also recut the metric threads to the bartlein threads?

No. The threads on a Howa 1500 are 26-1.5 Metric. Recutting to 1.060 x 16 TPI "American" (what I assume you mean by "bartlein threads") is basically impossible. It IS possible to bore out the metric, then recut threads to a larger standard...

...if the action were larger in diameter.

Leave the threads alone, or find a smith that is good with metric. That shouldn't be too tough if you look at the bigger names on the list.

-Nate
 

DWilson

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May 14, 2017
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Don't know what you mean by bartlein threads but the blank is threaded to match the metric receiver.
I get that. I guess i worded it wrong. I understand a smith single point chases/recuts the threads an then cuts the barrel to match. Well SAC,RWS and LRI does this. I'd say thats good enough for me lol. Thanks for the help guys
 

LongRifles Inc.

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    Threading a barrel is done with a tool that is the inverse of the shape it is cutting. A threading insert is a "thread form". The challenge for shops bound by conventional manual equipment surfaces when changing from imperial to metric threading. The same 60* thread form is used. It's the pitch, or number of threads per inch, that creates the problem. A conventional manual lathe often requires changing over to a different gear set on the back of the transmission to make metric threading work. On a CNC its irrelevant. All one does is either change from Imperial to metric using a single G code (G20 for imperial / G21 ='s metric) for most or you just convert the metric value to imperial (mmx.03937 gives you inches, etc) and leave the machine in G20 mode. (how I do it as its just easier for me to think in inches)

    If the barrel is a true blank, then there's no features other than the hole and the outside contour. Threading, chambering, etc is not done till its applied to a particular setup.

    Just fyi stuff in case someone doesn't quite get how this crap works.
     
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    LongRifles Inc.

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  • Mar 14, 2010
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    www.longriflesinc.com
    The metric stuff is a bugger on most manuals as its kind of an afterthought. The gear set is all driven to run imperial. Changing over quite often means the rules change when engaging the half nut. The safe rule I always used was to clock to the same value. Took a little longer as you had to wait for the dial to come around a full 360* but fortunately I never had to do much of it. This is where the automated machines quickly shine as the encoders and feed rates have no concern. So long as the encoder clocks to the same rotation point on the spindle and the same start point is used (which is never going to change anyway on a single start thread) then it just does the job and won't care about what system is being used.
     

    DWilson

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    May 14, 2017
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    The metric stuff is a bugger on most manuals as its kind of an afterthought. The gear set is all driven to run imperial. Changing over quite often means the rules change when engaging the half nut. The safe rule I always used was to clock to the same value. Took a little longer as you had to wait for the dial to come around a full 360* but fortunately I never had to do much of it. This is where the automated machines quickly shine as the encoders and feed rates have no concern. So long as the encoder clocks to the same rotation point on the spindle and the same start point is used (which is never going to change anyway on a single start thread) then it just does the job and won't care about what system is being used.
    Threading a barrel is done with a tool that is the inverse of the shape it is cutting. A threading insert is a "thread form". The challenge for shops bound by conventional manual equipment surfaces when changing from imperial to metric threading. The same 60* thread form is used. It's the pitch, or number of threads per inch, that creates the problem. A conventional manual lathe often requires changing over to a different gear set on the back of the transmission to make metric threading work. On a CNC its irrelevant. All one does is either change from Imperial to metric using a single G code (G20 for imperial / G21 ='s metric) for most or you just convert the metric value to imperial (mmx.03937 gives you inches, etc) and leave the machine in G20 mode. (how I do it as its just easier for me to think in inches)

    If the barrel is a true blank, then there's no features other than the hole and the outside contour. Threading, chambering, etc is not done till its applied to a particular setup.

    Just fyi stuff in case someone doesn't quite get how this crap works.
    thanks Chad for explaining all that. Cnc is where its at obviously. Just never saw any howas done on your videos an pics or website. U will b the man to molest my howa when i send it off. Thanks again,Dave
     

    DWilson

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    May 14, 2017
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    The metric stuff is a bugger on most manuals as its kind of an afterthought. The gear set is all driven to run imperial. Changing over quite often means the rules change when engaging the half nut. The safe rule I always used was to clock to the same value. Took a little longer as you had to wait for the dial to come around a full 360* but fortunately I never had to do much of it. This is where the automated machines quickly shine as the encoders and feed rates have no concern. So long as the encoder clocks to the same rotation point on the spindle and the same start point is used (which is never going to change anyway on a single start thread) then it just does the job and won't care about what system is being used.
    An while your here Chad,do u have a program to inlet stock blanks for the howa? Like a manners EH1 bedded for a short action howa?