If you're forced to leave

Strykervet

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Where the government tells me to go.

Trigger:

When they tell me to go.

Just kidding, if the ass blasters get out of hand then I'd probably team up with Burt Gummer and just sit it out. Wait. Or is Gummer coming over here? I forget.

Seriously? My only real concern short of civil unrest/civil war is the Cascadia Subduction Zone and I'd have less than an hour once the quake hits to make it to high ground, so I'd grab as much shit from the safe as I can throw in the truck and get the fuck out. There's a hill behind me that'll work unless the momentum turns it into a megatsunami, then it won't really matter, there won't be any way out fast enough.

That's saying we survive the quake in the first place.

If it's civil war, why leave? A warlord needs some place to base operations out of...
 
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thejeep

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The nuke plant goes tits up. See which way the wind is blowing which is the same direction 90%of the time. Grab the big box.
Typically I’m upwind.
 
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MallNinja243

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you home, do you have a plan in place as to where your going? If so what would be the trigger?
What kind of zombie apocalypse shit are you watching on TV? This should prove to be a pretty interesting thread.

The nuke plant goes tits up. See which way the wind is blowing which is the same direction 90%of the time. Grab the big box.
Typically I’m upwind.
Nuclear reactors in the US are buried hundreds of feet underground so that shouldn't be an issue.
 
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2aBaCa

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Forced to leave is pretty vague. Are we talking natural disaster or end of days apocolytic SHTF type shit? It would take an act of god to abandon the home base.

It really depends on the situation but most likely heading for the Mountains. Hijacking a boat and hitting the Pacific Ocean could be another option.
 
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Gunfighter14e2

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What kind of zombie apocalypse shit are you watching on TV? This should prove to be a pretty interesting thread.



Nuclear reactors in the US are buried hundreds of feet underground so that shouldn't be an issue.
Laughing,..really.
So you don't believe in hurricanes, massive fires, earth quakes or anything could make you relocate? If so your in a group of your own. I know people who had to book up do to truck an train wreaks an yet others, who lost power for two weeks + that were seeking fall back locations.
 

MallNinja243

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Laughing,..really.
So you don't believe in hurricanes, massive fires, earth quakes or anything could make you relocate? If so your in a group of your own. I know people who had to book up do to truck an train wreaks an yet others, who lost power for two weeks + that were seeking fall back locations.
Hurricane Harvey - 2017. Almost had to leave due to flooding but would not have been an issue. The two boats I have would accommodate my family and any necessities if that were the case. Lost power for two weeks. Made it. There was fire before electricity. Don't live close enough to a road or railroad that it could be a problem. Natural disasters are one thing. Apocalyptic fantasies are another.

If natural disasters happen, yes I have a back up plan. Anyone who doesn't is setting themselves up for failure. Also, money still works in natural disasters.
 

thejeep

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What kind of zombie apocalypse shit are you watching on TV? This should prove to be a pretty interesting thread.



Nuclear reactors in the US are buried hundreds of feet underground so that shouldn't be an issue.
When they broke ground for the plant my dad crawled out from under the first rock the dozier hit to lend a hand.
 

Strykervet

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What kind of zombie apocalypse shit are you watching on TV? This should prove to be a pretty interesting thread.



Nuclear reactors in the US are buried hundreds of feet underground so that shouldn't be an issue.
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say you've never heard of Fukushima...

I'm in touch with Burt frequently. If he says anything, I'll let you know.
Ask him if he's still got that tandem mount from Venezuela, I need one.
 
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MallNinja243

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When they broke ground for the plant my dad crawled out from under the first rock the dozier hit to lend a hand.
Did it hurt? Is he like Patrick Star? Sorry my kids watch a lot of SpongeBob...

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say you've never heard of Fukushima...
Fukishima…. The open top reactors that didn't do well with the saltwater intrusion... Yes. Again, our reactors are sealed off far underground.
 

alpine44

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Fukishima…. The open top reactors that didn't do well with the saltwater intrusion... Yes. Again, our reactors are sealed off far underground.
Hate to disappoint you. Some nuclear waste storage facilities are underground but reactors have an above-ground containment vessel.

But regardless of where you put the reactor, here is the real problem:

A nuclear reactor generates heat that turns water into steam, which then powers steam turbines that are mechanically connected to electric generators. Heat -> steam -> rotation -> electricity.

The water needs to be pumped into the reactor core to generate steam and cool the fuel rods. After the steam expands in the turbines, cooling towers or rivers are used to turn the steam back to water, which is then pumped back into reactor core. The cooling pumps are driven by electricity and have battery and generator backup.

When the control rods are inserted to stop the nuclear chain reaction, the amount of steam generated will become insufficient to run the large turbines and generators. So the nuclear plant cannot supply itself with electricity for the pumps once a shut down has been initiated either as planned or in an emergency. But you still need to cool the reactor for weeks after shut down for reasons explained in the next paragraph. If the electric grid and the backup batteries and the generators fail, as they did at Fukushima, the cooling pumps will stop and you are looking at a time bomb.

The nuclear chain reaction was stopped with the control rods but during normal operation the reactor created many radioactive isotopes that will decay and give off heat without a chain reaction. Even a shut-down reactor generates a lot of heat that needs to be removed. If you do not remove that heat, the fuel rods will eventually melt and the metal cladding will react with the hot water/steam to release Hydrogen which will eventually blow the lid off the containment, as you can see in the Fukushima footage. If that does not happen, the molten mass called Corium will eat its way trough the bottom of the building into the groundwater. Either way, it's going to be a big mess.

So, if you live near a nuclear reactor and survive a massive earthquake/tsunami or EMP, it would be a wise choice to skip town.
 
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Gunfighter14e2

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Fukishima…. The open top reactors that didn't do well with the saltwater intrusion... Yes. Again, our reactors are sealed off far underground.
Interesting,... as the report I read, indicated the failure was do to the diesel resips drowning, then w/o the cooling pumps it all started to take a shit from there. I'd be interested in reading any other final reports the state the event chain was started with salt water on the rods?
 
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BullGear

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As long as my house is standing, I'm staying home. Sure, I have other places I could go, but why. Everything I have or need is in my house. I wouldn't see any reason to leave all my supplies behind only to try to carry what I want or need to another location.

I'm not rich enough to set up 2 homesteads, complete with supplies and other things that I deem necessary.
 

Gunfighter14e2

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I'd suggest having many supplies at all points of the compass, vs one spot in the home. If the home is took over or burnt you still have operating goods to regroup with. This applies heavily to weapons an ammo. A single POS hand gun or rifle w/ammo, will at least allow you to,.... "Trade Up" if need be.
 

MallNinja243

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Jan 8, 2020
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Hate to disappoint you. Some nuclear waste storage facilities are underground but reactors have an above-ground containment vessel.

But regardless of where you put the reactor, here is the real problem:

A nuclear reactor generates heat that turns water into steam, which then powers steam turbines that are mechanically connected to electric generators. Heat -> steam -> rotation -> electricity.

The water needs to be pumped into the reactor core to generate steam and cool the fuel rods. After the steam expands in the turbines, cooling towers or rivers are used to turn the steam back to water, which is then pumped back into reactor core. The cooling pumps are driven by electricity and have battery and generator backup.

When the control rods are inserted to stop the nuclear chain reaction, the amount of steam generated will become insufficient to run the large turbines and generators. So the nuclear plant cannot supply itself with electricity for the pumps once a shut down has been initiated either as planned or in an emergency. But you still need to cool the reactor for weeks after shut down for reasons explained in the next paragraph. If the electric grid and the backup batteries and the generators fail, as they did at Fukushima, the cooling pumps will stop and you are looking at a time bomb.

The nuclear chain reaction was stopped with the control rods but during normal operation the reactor created many radioactive isotopes that will decay and give off heat without a chain reaction. Even a shut-down reactor generates a lot of heat that needs to be removed. If you do not remove that heat, the fuel rods will eventually melt and the metal cladding will react with the hot water/steam to release Hydrogen which will eventually blow the lid off the containment, as you can see in the Fukushima footage. If that does not happen, the molten mass called Corium will eat its way trough the bottom of the building into the groundwater. Either way, it's going to be a big mess.

So, if you live near a nuclear reactor and survive a massive earthquake/tsunami or EMP, it would be a wise choice to skip town.
You make a very valid point about the Corium deposits headed underground. It would take a huge chain of redundancies to fail in order to blow up a Nuclear facility in the US. Each plant has a double stacked SIS system which will run off of the new battery tech for over a month sustained. The natural steam flow can be forced through the backup/standby turbines and generate enough power to run cooling pumps long enough to cool it into a stable stage.

Also, the PDCs and MCCs at Nuclear facilities are sealed up so tight that it's a bad idea to fart in one. I tearfully learned that lesson the hard way. Anyway,, If a Nuclear plant has an unexpected shutdown, it's a pretty good chance that they will run everyone off for 50+ miles.

I think the hardest thing for me to overcome would be the beer shortage.
 

Greg Langelius *

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I've been through some pretty powerful and thorough radiation therapy.

I didn't like it even a little bit, but it was like being on the merry-ground in a squall; you only get off once they slow it down enough for the leap. They gave me enough to kill the cancer, but only slightly less than enough to kill me. So I've been in that neighborhood and come out of it 23 years later doing better than expected.

My research indicates that a radiation release is most serious to the downstream public most of all at the beginning of the exposure, then tapers off. Managing the event by seeking and staying inside cover or shelter for even a few days can minimize personal exposure to a fraction of what it could be without taking significant care to shelter out of it.

We have and refresh a supply of Potassium Iodide, too. When taken at the first warning, his saturates the thyroid with Iodine so that when/if Radioactive Iodine exposure occurs, its absorption is minimal.

Radiation exposure is a serious threat, with no assurances that any efforts to reduce exposure wouldn't be overwhelmed. You do what you can, and wait it out.

Greg
 
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UpSideDown

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Due to a few factors we have made a solid plan if we need to get out of the Williamette Valley in Oregon. With the spread of COVID-19 a lot of the basic supplies are getting bought up, which I think is good because we aren't in any emergency and this is a great trial run for people to grab the supplies that they should have on hand already. We didn't have the stuff we needed on hand so we got it now, while there's still more available. What I am concerned with is if the virus blows up here, which I strongly feel it will, the long-term supplies are going to sell and businesses are going to slow.

In concert with that, we are coming towards a major supply shock from the dive in incoming product and materials from China due to their outbreak. About the start of April it sounds pretty agreed upon, we will see major supply shortages in some fields. If that stops businesses, and combines with lots of people getting sick locally, my concern is that people will be getting more hysterical and doing things we wouldn't normally see.

Combine that will another potential dive in the stock market from these above reasons, and we could have unforeseen issues in 1-3 months.

Then we have a Presidential election coming late this year that would be heavily affected if there were to be an economic downturn or major disease outbreak, and our area gets a lot of violent protesting around that time.

We 100% plan to attend our responsibilities; we still have bills to pay, and we have a home we will come back to. If the need arises where we are genuinely concerned with staying in our home area, we have two small groups in different locations in different regions of Idaho that we would head to, to wait things out. We have food and water for 4-6 weeks on hand, and the means to fish, hunt and filter water, but I only imagine that there would be a short term supply shortage if there is a panic buy and I don't anticipate any doomsday scenario. With a high percentage of patients with COVID-19 progressing to a critical condition, I don't really want to catch it. I'd rather take some time off work and take a trip to the outdoors with people we like for a bit, and come back as things get a little better.
 
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UpSideDown

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I'm setting up a quarantine shed for Amazon deliveries.
No kidding. I understand it has a 9 hour surface life at room temp, and up to 9 day surface life if cold. I don't know what *cold* was when they found that. If an amazon employee or mailman or UPS/FedEx driver has it, those are viable transmission routes.
 

W54/XM-388

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I'm setting up a quarantine shed for Amazon deliveries.
No kidding. I understand it has a 9 hour surface life at room temp, and up to 9 day surface life if cold. I don't know what *cold* was when they found that. If an amazon employee or mailman or UPS/FedEx driver has it, those are viable transmission routes.
Here is a tip you may want to try.

Buy some UV disinfectant lamps from Japan, the kind they put in their kitchens and such.
Then put a few of them in your amazon shed all hooked up to one switch.
Once you have laid things out, walk out and flip the switch behind you. Then just make sure to flip the switch off the moment you walk back in.
 
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BullGear

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Here is a tip you may want to try.

Buy some UV disinfectant lamps from Japan, the kind they put in their kitchens and such.
Then put a few of them in your amazon shed all hooked up to one switch.
Once you have laid things out, walk out and flip the switch behind you. Then just make sure to flip the switch off the moment you walk back in.
But if you're opening up packages to UV radiate them, you've already exposed yourself to the virus. Plus, wouldn't you have to UV radiate both side of anything that doesn't get hit entirely from that first cleansing. That would mean exposing yourself a second time.

Also, I think I read that any packages coming into the US from China are being radiated at the port of entry. I can't confirm this, but I do believe that what I read.
 

Hobo Hilton

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Due to a few factors we have made a solid plan if we need to get out of the Williamette Valley in Oregon. With the spread of COVID-19 a lot of the basic supplies are getting bought up, which I think is good because we aren't in any emergency and this is a great trial run for people to grab the supplies that they should have on hand already. We didn't have the stuff we needed on hand so we got it now, while there's still more available. What I am concerned with is if the virus blows up here, which I strongly feel it will, the long-term supplies are going to sell and businesses are going to slow.

In concert with that, we are coming towards a major supply shock from the dive in incoming product and materials from China due to their outbreak. About the start of April it sounds pretty agreed upon, we will see major supply shortages in some fields. If that stops businesses, and combines with lots of people getting sick locally, my concern is that people will be getting more hysterical and doing things we wouldn't normally see.

Combine that will another potential dive in the stock market from these above reasons, and we could have unforeseen issues in 1-3 months.

Then we have a Presidential election coming late this year that would be heavily affected if there were to be an economic downturn or major disease outbreak, and our area gets a lot of violent protesting around that time.

We 100% plan to attend our responsibilities; we still have bills to pay, and we have a home we will come back to. If the need arises where we are genuinely concerned with staying in our home area, we have two small groups in different locations in different regions of Idaho that we would head to, to wait things out. We have food and water for 4-6 weeks on hand, and the means to fish, hunt and filter water, but I only imagine that there would be a short term supply shortage if there is a panic buy and I don't anticipate any doomsday scenario. With a high percentage of patients with COVID-19 progressing to a critical condition, I don't really want to catch it. I'd rather take some time off work and take a trip to the outdoors with people we like for a bit, and come back as things get a little better.
I'm very familiar with the Willamette Valley.... You could be in much worse locations. Being that the Valley is a good place, people are going to hang in there until the last minute to leave. I'd imagine the homeless in Portland will migrate South rather than North. That is when the chaos will begin. You certainly won't want to head North, South or West... You will be forced over the mountain range heading East... Do you have a dependable vehicle? For a fact, the population of Idaho is growing by leaps and bounds. You would want to get there before "There is no room at the Inn".... UHaul lots in Montana are filling up with trucks and trailers from people relocating and turning in the trucks. So, your thoughts are in line with many Americans who reside in populated areas. Best of Luck with your planning.

Hobo

A few "After thoughts": UpSideDown has placed more value on the well being of his family rather than his physical possessions. Property has "Insurance" should it be vandalized. A child can not be insured. Here we are, 700 years after the "Black Plague" and our most valued possessesions have not changed or our tacticts to escape the plague. Interesting.
 
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BullGear

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Due to a few factors we have made a solid plan if we need to get out of the Williamette Valley in Oregon. With the spread of COVID-19 a lot of the basic supplies are getting bought up, which I think is good because we aren't in any emergency and this is a great trial run for people to grab the supplies that they should have on hand already. We didn't have the stuff we needed on hand so we got it now, while there's still more available. What I am concerned with is if the virus blows up here, which I strongly feel it will, the long-term supplies are going to sell and businesses are going to slow.

In concert with that, we are coming towards a major supply shock from the dive in incoming product and materials from China due to their outbreak. About the start of April it sounds pretty agreed upon, we will see major supply shortages in some fields. If that stops businesses, and combines with lots of people getting sick locally, my concern is that people will be getting more hysterical and doing things we wouldn't normally see.

Combine that will another potential dive in the stock market from these above reasons, and we could have unforeseen issues in 1-3 months.

Then we have a Presidential election coming late this year that would be heavily affected if there were to be an economic downturn or major disease outbreak, and our area gets a lot of violent protesting around that time.

We 100% plan to attend our responsibilities; we still have bills to pay, and we have a home we will come back to. If the need arises where we are genuinely concerned with staying in our home area, we have two small groups in different locations in different regions of Idaho that we would head to, to wait things out. We have food and water for 4-6 weeks on hand, and the means to fish, hunt and filter water, but I only imagine that there would be a short term supply shortage if there is a panic buy and I don't anticipate any doomsday scenario. With a high percentage of patients with COVID-19 progressing to a critical condition, I don't really want to catch it. I'd rather take some time off work and take a trip to the outdoors with people we like for a bit, and come back as things get a little better.

I don't understand your reasons to leave all of your supplies and good shelter to somehow outrun the virus. If you stay in your home, don't let anyone inside or near your property, I don't see why you'd want to leave. You have food, water, shelter, heat/AC, creature comforts and the ability to communicate and are close to help (hospitals/police/fire) if you need them.

This doesn't include vandalism to your house if you're not around to protect it.

All of this in response to a virus that is not the killer that the MSM is portraying it to be. Sure, it's going to kill people, but those people of of ill health BEFORE the contract the virus. One of the Americans who was on the cruise ship in Japan was airlifted to the USA and tested positive. He said it's not as bad as those iin the media are saying.

I understand being safer than sorry, but I just don't see why you'd want to run away from a perfectly good house and supplies, when you can self quarantine your family there and not in the woods of Idaho.
 

UpSideDown

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I'm very familiar with the Willamette Valley.... You could be in much worse locations. Being that the Valley is a good place, people are going to hang in there until the last minute to leave. I'd imagine the homeless in Portland will migrate South rather than North. That is when the chaos will begin. You certainly won't want to head North, South or West... You will be forced over the mountain range heading East... Do you have a dependable vehicle? For a fact, the population of Idaho is growing by leaps and bounds. You would want to get there before "There is no room at the Inn".... UHaul lots in Montana are filling up with trucks and trailers from people relocating and turning in the trucks. So, your thoughts are in line with many Americans who reside in populated areas. Best of Luck with your planning.

Hobo

A few "After thoughts": UpSideDown has placed more value on the well being of his family rather than his physical possessions. Property has "Insurance" should it be vandalized. A child can not be insured. Here we are, 700 years after the "Black Plague" and our most valued possessesions have not changed or our tacticts to escape the plague. Interesting.
The Williamette Valley on its own is in theory a great place to be for all sorts of reasons. Major cities closeby, farmland, abundant water and shelter, easy weather. But if I'm concerned enough to be uncomfortable, then a lot of other people are as well, and the area could get uncomfortable fairly quickly. North to Washington, South to the Oregon forest boonies, and west to the coast aren't great options. East is better. Worst case scenario for us is if travel restrictions are implemented, which would be a pretty extreme circumstance that I don't foresee.


I don't understand your reasons to leave all of your supplies and good shelter to somehow outrun the virus. If you stay in your home, don't let anyone inside or near your property, I don't see why you'd want to leave. You have food, water, shelter, heat/AC, creature comforts and the ability to communicate and are close to help (hospitals/police/fire) if you need them.

This doesn't include vandalism to your house if you're not around to protect it.

All of this in response to a virus that is not the killer that the MSM is portraying it to be. Sure, it's going to kill people, but those people of of ill health BEFORE the contract the virus. One of the Americans who was on the cruise ship in Japan was airlifted to the USA and tested positive. He said it's not as bad as those iin the media are saying.

I understand being safer than sorry, but I just don't see why you'd want to run away from a perfectly good house and supplies, when you can self quarantine your family there and not in the woods of Idaho.
We spend a lot of our time on the road and camping. We are very set up for it and have lived for extended periods out of a vehicle. We have private land on water to go to. If anything it's a nice vacation from things, rather than fearing for our lives.

And yes, I think the virus is definitely something to be concerned with. This might be the first time the media is on track with how wild it could be. Average mortality rate at this time is at 3.4%, compared to our last seasonal flu that ended at 0.1%. Of those affected by the disease, 15-20% need critical care in hospital, and if those patients don't receive it the mortality rate skyrockets. The contagion rate and the asymptomatic contagious period of the disease make it very fast spreading and hard to stop. It isn't going to be contained here, and it isn't contained in China. China is probably seeing at least 10x the cases they have reported. They aren't going to catch up with production any time soon and the stock market isn't going to go back to being all happy. We might see pretty quickly what the future holds; either the graph is going to go up a bit and level off, or the graph is going to shoot up exponentially. Even with modern medicine we might be looking at a season of this disease roughly comparable to the 1918/19 Spanish Flu. Or it gets curbed and turns into something small and we're ok and we can all be happy.
 
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GrantB

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Let’s see, growing up I’ve evacuated numerous hurricanes. In the last 15 or years I’ve had to evacuate my work site 2 times, once because a gas well blew out and the state police came around and made everyone leave without their vehicles and the other time was a chemical spill. One other time I was going home and a few miles from the house I was stoped by police and said the roads were closed while they were looking for escaped prisoners, that took 18 hours before I could go home. Another time we had to leave the house because there was a train derailment a mile or so away from the house with chemicals and we were down wind. There are lots of reasons that you may not be able to go home or have to leave it so, always be prepared.
 

Darkside-Six

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The only thing I think I need to worry about would be house fire/wildfire or a fucking meteor falling from the sky and crushing me.
Where I’m at in Michigan, we don’t have any volcanos and we don’t really get earth quakes. Any type of civil war or unrest citation and I’m probably digging in.
If for some reason we do need to bail, we have a location further up north we would go.
 

calamjn

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Hate to disappoint you. Some nuclear waste storage facilities are underground but reactors have an above-ground containment vessel.

But regardless of where you put the reactor, here is the real problem:

A nuclear reactor generates heat that turns water into steam, which then powers steam turbines that are mechanically connected to electric generators. Heat -> steam -> rotation -> electricity.

The water needs to be pumped into the reactor core to generate steam and cool the fuel rods. After the steam expands in the turbines, cooling towers or rivers are used to turn the steam back to water, which is then pumped back into reactor core. The cooling pumps are driven by electricity and have battery and generator backup.

When the control rods are inserted to stop the nuclear chain reaction, the amount of steam generated will become insufficient to run the large turbines and generators. So the nuclear plant cannot supply itself with electricity for the pumps once a shut down has been initiated either as planned or in an emergency. But you still need to cool the reactor for weeks after shut down for reasons explained in the next paragraph. If the electric grid and the backup batteries and the generators fail, as they did at Fukushima, the cooling pumps will stop and you are looking at a time bomb.

The nuclear chain reaction was stopped with the control rods but during normal operation the reactor created many radioactive isotopes that will decay and give off heat without a chain reaction. Even a shut-down reactor generates a lot of heat that needs to be removed. If you do not remove that heat, the fuel rods will eventually melt and the metal cladding will react with the hot water/steam to release Hydrogen which will eventually blow the lid off the containment, as you can see in the Fukushima footage. If that does not happen, the molten mass called Corium will eat its way trough the bottom of the building into the groundwater. Either way, it's going to be a big mess.

So, if you live near a nuclear reactor and survive a massive earthquake/tsunami or EMP, it would be a wise choice to skip town.
I bought some CBRN gas masks w/ filters and some Iosat tablets. You think I’m good to go? ?
 

calamjn

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I would leave if I ran out of Haribo Gummi Bears, but that only happens once a year. Then back to home base.
 

UpSideDown

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Warm and fuzzy words from a State in a state of emergency. Pairs nicely with New York already calling in the National Guard to quarantine an area, so far voluntarily.
 

UpSideDown

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The virus, the economy, and response policy will absolutely affect the outcome.
 

jinxx4ever

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3,891
219
The virus, the economy, and response policy will absolutely affect the outcome.
Trump supporters aren't going away, in fact if anything, this re enforces his base as he's tried to get the wall built to keep the scum out that is bringing the crap across the border. Just another thing he'll point out the dems fought him on