Muzzle brake help

nitronova

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May 20, 2010
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henderson nv
I have a brake on my 300 win mag but I'm not to happy with it. Lots of barrel hop and didn't reduce recoil all that much. It is a generic that a gunsmith made locally. Anyway what type of brake are you guys running or your prefrences on one?
 

*greenhorn*

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Aug 24, 2011
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Re: Muzzle brake help

pull out check book out, take to gunsmith, have it threaded and put a 30 cal fat daddy on it, put big smile on your face and pull that trigger.

done
 

mscott

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Oct 10, 2007
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Re: Muzzle brake help

Do some searching and you'll find plenty of opinions. The APA little bastard, Badger thruster, RWS, Harrell's, J.P., FTE, and a few others all have a following. Choose any of those and you'll be set.
 

winxp_man

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Jun 20, 2009
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Re: Muzzle brake help

I love my BO FTE brake reduced my barrel hope big big time
smile.gif
I will try to get a video of it next time I go out shooting it.




Aron-
 

Killer Spade 13

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Re: Muzzle brake help

OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment?
 

HPLLC

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Re: Muzzle brake help

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment? </div></div>

A thread relief cut helps by eliminating potentially interfering metal.

6 things dictate proper alignment:

1 concentricity of thread to barrel bore
2 alignment of barrel bore to thread (parallel)
3 a barrel thread shoulder perpendicular to the thread and bore
4 a muzzle break rear face perpendicular with its muzzle aperture
5 a muzzle brake thread concentric to its aperture.
6 properly tightened muzzle brake to put necessary surfaces into contact.

 

BasraBoy

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Re: Muzzle brake help

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Griffin Armament</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment? </div></div>

A thread relief cut helps by eliminating potentially interfering metal.

6 things dictate proper alignment:

1 concentricity of thread to barrel bore
2 alignment of barrel bore to thread (parallel)
3 a barrel thread shoulder perpendicular to the thread and bore
4 a muzzle break rear face perpendicular with its muzzle aperture
5 a muzzle brake thread concentric to its aperture.
6 properly tightened muzzle brake to put necessary surfaces into contact.

</div></div>

Provided all these surfaces are parrallel adn perpendicular, how does one then achieve the correct timing on side ported brakes?

Does the ports have to be exactly at 90 degrees to the vertical axis of the barrel?

The reason I ask is that on my AW I just screw my tactical brake on and level it by eye then torque up the hex bolt.....

Would this affect accuracy if not perfectly aligned/timed?
 

Killer Spade 13

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Re: Muzzle brake help

BasraBoy,

Thanks for clarifying my post. That's the question I was asking. The OD threads on the barrel and the ID threads in the brake may not be machined so that when the brake is flush with the machined shoulder of the barrel, the ports are in correct alignment.
 

300sniper

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Jan 17, 2005
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Re: Muzzle brake help

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment? </div></div>

you would be lucky that it times correctly. most likely, you will need to have material removed from the barrel shoulder or the rear of the muzzle device. this will require a lathe and someone that knows how to use it.
 

BLANKSGUNS

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Re: Muzzle brake help

We have some SAS Gen I brakes on close out since they will no longer work with the newer suppressor connection, extremely effective up to the .338LM for $75.00 with 3/4x24 threading. We have the newer Gen II in 5/8x24 for $125. We also have the Badger Ordnance FTE in 5/8x24 and 3/4x28 in stock as well. If you would like some assistance with the muzzle brake and/or barrel threading give us a call and we will be glad to assist.
 

BasraBoy

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Re: Muzzle brake help

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: 300sniper</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment? </div></div>

you would be lucky that it times correctly. most likely, you will need to have material removed from the barrel shoulder or the rear of the muzzle device. this will require a lathe and someone that knows how to use it. </div></div>

What about using a shim or crush washer instead of removing material?

And I'm still not 100% clear - is "correct timing" purely a matter of the ports being at exactly 90 degrees to the vertical axis or is there a degree of tolerance?
 

Jig Stick

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Aug 27, 2010
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Re: Muzzle brake help

If you are not going to be shooting in the dirt too much, and mostly from a bench at the range, and in hunting situtations, i HIGHLY recommend a Vias muzzle brake. i have one on my 300winmag and i can shoot it all day long. Im shooting the 208 Amax and 210 Berger VLD's, and the recoil and muzzle climb is so small that I can keep my sight picture on target and watch the hits.
 

nitronova

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May 20, 2010
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henderson nv
Re: Muzzle brake help

Anyone have any luck with the following painkiller and muscle brake? Thanks for the replies I am looking into them all just stubbled across these 2 and thought I would ask.
 

mscott

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Re: Muzzle brake help

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Killer Spade 13</div><div class="ubbcode-body">OK, a quick question from the ignorant.
You have your barrel threaded. You buy your brake.
What insures that the brake, when threaded onto the barrell, bottoms against the machined shoulder of the OD of the barrel in correct alignment? </div></div>

Best thing to do is buy your brake and then have a good smith thread the barrel and time the brake. During the install it will also likely need to be reamed for the caliber and tapered to fit the barrel. Plan ahead on thread pitch in case you ever want a suppressor as some brakes have odd threads.