Nightforce TS-82 Spotting Scope

TRH1962

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I sure do hope to one day be able to afford the NF TS-82 spotting scope. I know they are worth every penny, but they are a little high at the moment in price. Hopefully they will come down in price soon so that I can pick one up. When that day comes, I hope to have made a decision on which one to choose from. Either the straight or angled version. I will have one of them one day soon!
 

TO 8217

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Absolutely love mine. Even had it painted to match my rifle stock.
image.jpg
 

Bounce

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You'll save a few hundred bucks if you get the Meopta model which is identical to the NF because Meopta makes the NF. Also, You should be looking at the angled version, not the straight. The straight is not very versatile.
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TRH1962

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May have to look into that one. But what do you mean by the straight version not being very versatile. In what ways would that be?
 

Bounce

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Lots of viewpoints on the topic of straight vs angled spotting scopes. Much depends on how you will be using it, or better still, the number of ways you'll be using it. Google "straight vs. angled spotting scope" and you'll get a pretty good idea of the underlying issues with each.
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scudzuki

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A straight spotter requires it be setup between the user and the target. For me it's a lot less versatile than an angled spotter.
An angled spotter can be setup to the side of the rifle with the eyepiece rotated towards the shooter when shooting prone or from a bench. The shooter does not have to change their body position to look through it, they merely turn their head.
The only time a straight spotter is slightly better is when being used by a designated spotter, because the spotter's head is in a more natural (nearly vertical) orientation. The way angled spotters are usually setup for dedicated spotting requires the user to bend their neck down, which can get tiring over long periods. It is possible to rotate the eyepiece on the angled spotter down and sit to the side of the spotter, to keep your head vertical, but I don't see this done much (if at all).
 

mewillis

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I have the Meopta and it's great for the money but its no Swaro or comparable Euro spotter, that said its hundreds of dollars less and does the same unless you like having the most expensive. If spotting was my job or hobby ie; birding or some other use I would pop for the extra dollars but otherwise I very much enjoy the Meopta glass, have 2 scopes and the S2 82.
 

MilDot1960

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A straight spotter requires it be setup between the user and the target. For me it's a lot less versatile than an angled spotter.
An angled spotter can be setup to the side of the rifle with the eyepiece rotated towards the shooter when shooting prone or from a bench. The shooter does not have to change their body position to look through it, they merely turn their head.
The only time a straight spotter is slightly better is when being used by a designated spotter, because the spotter's head is in a more natural (nearly vertical) orientation. The way angled spotters are usually setup for dedicated spotting requires the user to bend their neck down, which can get tiring over long periods. It is possible to rotate the eyepiece on the angled spotter down and sit to the side of the spotter, to keep your head vertical, but I don't see this done much (if at all).

An angled spotter is hard work when used for observation and target location or even just range observation because you have to look down all the time and end up with a sore neck and they are no good from a tactical point of view because you need to be looking towards the threat, They are good for searching for wild life in trees and star gazing and bench rest shooting or Range work, Regardless of the brand or cost or quality Angled spotters have very limited use,
 

scudzuki

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An angled spotter is hard work when used for observation and target location or even just range observation because you have to look down all the time and end up with a sore neck and they are no good from a tactical point of view because you need to be looking towards the threat, They are good for searching for wild life in trees and star gazing and bench rest shooting or Range work, Regardless of the brand or cost or quality Angled spotters have very limited use,

Unless I am behind it for an extended period, craning my neck down does not bother me, and I use it for so many more things than sitting/standing behind it looking forward. If it did bother me I could rotate the body 90 degrees and turn my head 45 degrees to see downrange, or even turn my entire body 45degree, no looking down.
You see, a straight spotting scope has a slight advantage in that use but is unusable for so many others. I can't justify two $3000 spotters, so I get the one that is the most versatile.

Apparently I'm not alone in my beliefs, there are an awful lot of angled spotters I see shooters purchased and in use at the range, and when I shoot a comp the marshals are frequently standing behind an angled spotter.
 
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MilDot1960

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Unless I am behind it for an extended period, craning my neck down does not bother me, and I use it for so many more things than sitting/standing behind it looking forward. If it did bother me I could rotate the body 90 degrees and turn my head 45 degrees to see downrange, or even turn my entire body 45degree, no looking down.
You see, a straight spotting scope has a slight advantage in that use but is unusable for so many others. I can't justify two $3000 spotters, so I get the one that is the most versatile.

Apparently I'm not alone in my beliefs, there are an awful lot of angled spotters I see shooters purchased and in use at the range, and when I shoot a comp the marshals are frequently standing behind an angled spotter.

yeah I sort of agree, I have my old straight Camo Tasco 12-36 which is a great Scope and then I bought the Bushnell Excursion with a mildot Ret which is like the Mk 4 and I have a German Angled 20-60 spotter and I also have the Leupold 12-40x60 GR HD Kit, I prefer my old Tasco and sometimes I use the GR, It just depends on what I am doing as to which one I use, The 45* one is better if I am looking up at step angles, Like you I don't agree on spending 3k on a spotter I only paid about $1550.00 brand new for the Leupold GR HD Kit so I think I got a good deal, I don't think a person needs to spend more than that on a spotter, It's more of a matter of want than need. There is a few people here that are having a lot of success with that new Bushnell So it's a buyers market for sure.

John.
 
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