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MJF

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  • Jun 14, 2005
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    I grew up reading articles written by Bill Jordan in gun magazines. I've been looking for a copy of his book since I lost mine when I went into the Army. After a long search I found a copy in as new condition! A good day for me. Any of you remember Bills articles?
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    Jefe's Dope

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    I thought I read that you're supposed to 'hook' your finger on the trigger of a revolver. Can someone clarify this for me?
     

    TexPatriot

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    I have a copy of that book within sight of my desk here which I studied in the late 70's and eighties. As a result my first handgun was a S&W Mod. 19 with a Jordon holster with the exposed trigger.

    I studied his quick draw technique practicing with bees wax squib rounds like he showed in the book and became a pretty slick point shooter as a result.

    The 1911 I transitioned over to was a completely different platform but I was determined to incorporate his fluid piston method of scooping a revolver as opposed to grabbing the gun like most semi auto shooters do.
     
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    TexPatriot

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    Yes, and Skeeter, and Elmer.
    I remember in one article, Skeeter Skelton said he had a favorite revolver he had to hide anytime Bill Jordon dropped by to visit to keep him from stealing it. I enjoyed their good natured ribbing.

    Jordon himself was a man of dry wit and great sense of humor.
     
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    Maggot

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  • Jul 27, 2007
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    Instead of using the pad of your finger, you hook your finger around the trigger. Again, I'm looking for clarification, not instructing anyone.
    I shoot both a Colt 1911 and a Smith and Wesson 625 and use the same finger technique on both. Seems to work fine, I wonder about the wisdom of having to integrate two positions when your life can end in split seconds,
     
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    TexPatriot

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    Instead of using the pad of your finger, you hook your finger around the trigger. Again, I'm looking for clarification, not instructing anyone.
    In his draw, you engaged the trigger as soon as you hooked the front strap of the grip and started pulling the double action trigger, hence the reason Jordon's holster had the exposed trigger.

    The gun goes off as soon as the gun is leveled in one fluid, synergized motion. This was for close range gun fighting.
     

    Maggot

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    A head shot would of required less bandage usually a wine cork would work.
    THis..

    Also saves on ambulance transport, Intensive Care, a long rehab, not to mention a long trial and hopefully a long imprisonment.

    Headshot has such a nice ring.
     
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    Terry Cross

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    That's going to go high and left.
    Bill used to do exhibition shooting.
    He would also visit several State Police academies when they were working firearms blocks.

    He would do quick draw demos with wax bullets hitting aspirin tablets on the far end of an 8ft table, etc...

    He designed some of the most popular duty holsters of the time and Don Hume made most of them. I think one line was called the Border Patrol Special.

    He is pretty much responsible for S&W creating the K frame magnums.

    He was quite tall and his damned hands were the size of baseball gloves so him holding a revolver made it look like a toy anyway.

    He may or may not have had shooting form that is fashionable today but he sure as shit got it done I spite of that.

    He was originally from Cheneyville, LA and was long time friend with Jim Clark Sr. Also ran in same circles as Col.Askins, Col Quiros, O'Conner, Skeeter, Keith, Saunders and others.

    I believe Bill was also awarded the American Handgunner Award by the Guild .

    .
    ETA corrected place of birth.
     
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    Slash0311

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    What I've seen from differences between revolvers to semi-autos deals with the weight of the trigger pull. Most revolvers have about a 12 pound while standard semi-autos are 5 1/2 (at least that's most Glocks and similar for LEO use). A lot of shooters put more finger on the trigger to help overcome the trigger weight. I saw this when my ladt department issues Glock G22s for duty carry but the S&W 442s for off duty.
     
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    TexPatriot

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    Bill used to do exhibition shooting.
    He would also visit several State Police academies when they were working firearms blocks.

    He would do quick draw demos with wax bullets hitting aspirin tablets on the far end of an 8ft table, etc...

    He designed some of the most popular duty holsters of the time and Don Hume made most of them. I think one line was called the Border Patrol Special.

    He is pretty much responsible for S&W creating the K frame magnums.

    He was quite tall and his damned hands were the size of baseball gloves so him holding a revolver made it look like a toy anyway.

    He may or may not have had shooting form that is fashionable today but he sure as shit got it done I spite of that.

    He was originally from Keithville, LA and was long time friend with Jim Clark Sr. Also ran in same circles as Col.Askins, Col Quiros, O'Conner, Skeeter, Keith, Saunders and others.

    I believe Bill was also awarded the American Handgunner Award by the Guild .

    .

    .
    Bill's hands were so big he designed and came out with a line of wood grips to replace those on the K frame and Python that were more conducive for recoil control. He needed them but I tried a pair and sold them as they were way too my for my hands. That made me feel like a weenie.

    His quick draw feats were incredible, dropping a ping pong ball from holster height and drawing and hitting it with the same hand before it hit the ground.
     

    Memtb

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    I grew up reading articles written by Bill Jordan in gun magazines. I've been looking for a copy of his book since I lost mine when I went into the Army. After a long search I found a copy in as new condition! A good day for me. Any of you remember Bills articles?
    View attachment 7744569

    Yes I do, and have an autographed copy of his book! Bill was born in a little (very little) town in Central Louisiana.....about 20 miles from where my grand parents lived! Though I never met him, I did get to talk to him once on the telephone! memtb
     
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    Memtb

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    Bill used to do exhibition shooting.
    He would also visit several State Police academies when they were working firearms blocks.

    He would do quick draw demos with wax bullets hitting aspirin tablets on the far end of an 8ft table, etc...

    He designed some of the most popular duty holsters of the time and Don Hume made most of them. I think one line was called the Border Patrol Special.

    He is pretty much responsible for S&W creating the K frame magnums.

    He was quite tall and his damned hands were the size of baseball gloves so him holding a revolver made it look like a toy anyway.

    He may or may not have had shooting form that is fashionable today but he sure as shit got it done I spite of that.

    He was originally from Keithville, LA and was long time friend with Jim Clark Sr. Also ran in same circles as Col.Askins, Col Quiros, O'Conner, Skeeter, Keith, Saunders and others.

    I believe Bill was also awarded the American Handgunner Award by the Guild .

    .

    .

    Terry, it’s certainly nothing to argue about, but I thought that Bill was actually born in Cheneyville. I could easily be incorrect about that! memtb
     
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    Plinker 73

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    I have a signed copy of the book that i reread every once in a while. My grandfather took me to see him when i was very young but i still remember the shooting part of the demo.
     
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    Terry Cross

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    Terry, it’s certainly nothing to argue about, but I thought that Bill was actually born in Cheneyville. I could easily be incorrect about that! memtb
    You know, i think you're correct. My fucked up memory.
    Good catch.
    I went back and corrected my post. Thank you.
    .
     
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    MJF

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    I'm sitting by the fire reading it for the first time in 35 years. I would love to have my stack of gun magazines with the articles by Jordan, Kieth, Skeeter, O'Conner etc. They are the reason I have a .357, .44 and a .270. What a different time we are in now days.
     
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    MJF

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    Bill Jordan would call all the "tactical instructors" of today a bunch of fags.

    The men of his era were hard men, and boiled everything down to the bare bones of helping people who fuck around, to find out.
    I was just thinking the very same thing! I shake my head when I see the tactical training crowd, training by standing out in the open square to their target. In the video above that @Downtown posted you can see Bill shoot to the side, front and rear of himself.
     

    Bigfatcock

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    The standing square comes from having plates.

    If I have my body armor on, and If in the open, then I am squared. No body armor and I am blading.

    Or just seek cover, lol.

    Bill was all about just killing the person before they could kill you, at close range. No draw, up, out with your basic warriors stance, lol.

    Get the gun out and shoot the person. Practice was important.
     

    308pirate

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    No, that is never correct on any firearm.
    I use the middle joint of my index finger to roll a revolver's DA trigger. It's what's natural for me. It must work cause I end up in the top 5 of IDPA matches with one, beating a shitload of semi auto shooters.
     

    308pirate

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    Bill Jordan would call all the "tactical instructors" of today a bunch of fags.

    The men of his era were hard men, and boiled everything down to the bare bones of helping people who fuck around, to find out.

    Probably bitch slap quite a few of them too
     
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    TexPatriot

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    Bill Jordan would call all the "tactical instructors" of today a bunch of fags.

    The men of his era were hard men, and boiled everything down to the bare bones of helping people who fuck around, to find out.
    Especially if the instructor said the semi-auto was the ultimate sidearm in a gunfight. Jordon's opinion when it came to a wheel gun vs. semi-auto was "I'll take my revolver, you take your chances."

    Bill's take on that was the 1911 was not designed to be quick drawn from a holster, rather it was supposed to be in your hand when the shit went down.
     
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    TexPatriot

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    And make moves on their wives!
    I remember one comment he wrote, I can't remember it verbatim after 40 yrs., was if you let your guard down or get lax and come up on the losing end of a gunfight, it wouldn't be much of a consolation knowing your wife's new husband would get to enjoy everything you had worked for.
     

    Jim Out

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    I grew up reading articles written by Bill Jordan in gun magazines. I've been looking for a copy of his book since I lost mine when I went into the Army. After a long search I found a copy in as new condition! A good day for me. Any of you remember Bills articles?
    View attachment 7744569
    My dear friend, and landlord, Cecil Carty was a bona fide west Texas cowboy and lawman.

    Had his teeth shot out in Tucson on Houghton Rd., fought in the Bay of Pigs, married a gorgeous Philippino lady he met from his time fighting there.....

    ...and said to me ,"James, I am a just man."

    Swore by the Python, just like Bill.

    Shortest hammer at the time.
     
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    TexPatriot

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    When we had men like this in positions of power the checks and balances worked…..unfortunately that ship has sailed…..🥲
    I studied a lot of the old school lawmen and shootists, from Austin's Ben Thompson, his nemesis Kingfisher, Bill Hickock, Hardin, Clay Allison, Hamer, to Charles Askins.

    Some were straight up, cold blooded psychopaths. In Charles Askins sector on the border, farmers started complaining to the BP that bodies were clogging up their irrigation canals.
     
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