PRS Dry Fire Prep

AHart76

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So I signed up for my first PRS match December 2nd at Rockcastle Shooting Center down in KY. Got a buddy that is shooting this regional series for points who is gonna go out with me and help me collect and confirm dope and give me some training tips. Being that we are less than a month away though I would like to do dry fire training. The thing is, everytime I’ve done a little dry fire, I feel like I’m missing the point? I try to focus on breathing, follow through, a slow but diliberate trigger pull, and bolt manipulation. Is this all I should be doing? I keep feeling like I’m missing something by not looking at a target. That is hard to do however when I’m trying to dry fire in my basement. So what exactly should I be focusing on? Any drills that mix it up from just laying on the ground clicking away? I’m super pumped for this match, and am fully prepared to take last, I just wanna do everything I can to prepare and do my best. Thanks for any advice!
 

Jibnast

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I would practice in different positions than just prone. I would say you most likely do not have a barricade I would get a chair and work up a good stable firing position on the back and practice fundamentals.
 

AHart76

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Okay, that Would probably work! I don’t have any shooting bags, my buddy is gonna let me use his, I could stuff a hoodie in a draw string bag and kinda use that to mimic a medium/bigger size bag to help!
 

davsco

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i just did my first big positional match. getting a solid rear rest is def what i need to work on, shooting on and thru barricades, logs, barrels and the like. practice with chairs, tables, trash cans, handrails on decks and stairs, windowsills. watch some PRS youtubes and try to recreate the positions around your house.
 

mi223

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I like to use a 6ft step ladder if you have one. Practice finding a comfortable position dryfiring from each step. Like others said try to find solid shooting positions from as many different hights/positions as you can.

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47guy

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agree with jibnast...i would also recommend you try to use the least amount of gear you can when practicing...the only gear i use now is a sling a creedmoore sport glove and an original game changer bag and i use this gear as little as possible....they are changing the rules at our local matches and will only allow 1 bag the size of a volleyball or smaller and a sling.
 

Mike_Honcho

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Prone - IMHO prone with an IOTA is good thing. I like using it with a POA on a mirror. If the crosshair so much as wiggles - you know you can improve on either your trigger pull, your position, or both. *I* do not find much value in prone without an IOTA. https://www.snipershide.com/shooting/forum/...ing-aid/page11

Seated / kneeling / standing / barricade / roll over prone / rice paddy squat / slung - map out a scaled 1/2 or even 1/4 MOA POA and work with it. Use it in conjunction with your timer. Main thing - be able to call your shot.

Do some burpees or pushups to get your heart rate up.

Use the timer - how fast can you make a 4 POA run with holds?

Again - MSU. Get comfortable making hits and manipulating.the weapon in an otherwise uncomfortable position, then work on speed. Then go do it live in 40 degrees and rain.


IMHO and all that.
 

AHart76

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I NEED THAT I.O.T.A.!! Where does one fine one tho? I have a Vortex PST 6-24x50. A quick google search and all I could find were reviews, no place that had em for sale. That thread was from 2013, I wasn’t sure if I could still contact that guy through that email?
 

morganlamprecht

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what all these guys said...the first thing i try to get new shooters to work on is finding STABLE, be creative and if youre going to run gear, know when/where it works and is needed...i see lots of guys throwing bags under everything just because they have it when it actually makes the shot more awkward or unstable, or they waste time fumbling with gear they didnt really need on a stage to begin with

hook a bipod, push into stop/magwell (make sure your rifle feeds with pressure on the magwell left/right/up, and if it doesnt, be mindful of it), use no bag under the gun, use a bag, grab one bipod leg, etc...you can never have too many ways to attack the props...always try to have something under the rear of the rifle...knee/tripod leg/pressure into the prop in some way...put up a aiming point to scale that is around 1-1.5 moa and find ways to hold it...maybe not the entire time as youre adjusting and breathing, but you should be able to settle and hold the target for a few seconds to allow you to break the trigger

once you get the positions down, its just a matter of breaking the trigger...get to where you dont have to think about it...youre focused on the sights and target, when the sight picture is where you want it, the trigger breaks without thinking about trigger control, and try your best to watch the bullet fly to and hit the target so if adjustments are needed you can make them, i will take an extremely uncomfortable, but solid position that allows me to manage recoil, over a comfortable one that doesnt...dont be in such a rush to run the bolt and get the next shot off that you forgot to see where the previous shot went
 
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skulldragr17

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Dry fire training is some of the best practice you can do, especially for PRS because it's so dynamic. Practicing extensively with live rounds will only increase your tendency to anticipate. For newer shooters, I'd say that positions is the #1 thing to work on. After that it would be fundamentals, time and wind. Every shooter is different, but this tends to be what I see. If I were you I would go practice with a 90 sec timer and make up some realistic COFs that you could dry fire. Once it's fluid, then increase your heart rate and try again (^^Mike_Honcho^^ has the right idea) . Then you can dry live fire and see how you do.

Most people just lose their mind once the timer goes off in a match lol. Just try to practice under pressure now. You should really enjoy the match! We have a few of our Accurate Ordnance guys going there as well. Be sure to say hello! Good luck at the match.
 

bab029

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You definitely need a spot to aim at. Not sure how much room you have, but a 6D nail head on a white background works pretty good at 50 yards. I have three goals for dry fire in this sport:

1) Getting into a stable position quickly with minimal readjustment.
2) Bolt manipulation while maintaining sight picture.
3) Trigger control during and after breaking the shot (don't want the reticle to leave the target)

Just remember to train intentionally, and to train good habits.
 

Birddog6424

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    There are some great tips above. I'll add a couple of mine.

    Dry fire practice is extremely useful from a couple aspects. No matter what you decide to do for positions and support, this kind of practice is there to help you get good at it. This teaches you to build a position in a timely manner with decent support. Anytime you have to do something in a match that you haven't done before, it's most likely not going to go as well as it could. So first of all, try to avoid positions you have never practiced while at a match. Don't do what someone else is doing simply because it worked for them. Stick to what you know whenever possible. So try to practice lots of positions, lots of transitioning from one position to another and breaking down and rebuilding those positions in a timely manner.

    And secondly, PRS is not about a slow, deliberate trigger pull. If the trigger break surprises you, you're doing it wrong. You need to learn to break the trigger as the crosshair is on the target. You won't always have the benefit of a super stable position, so there will be movement. Timing the trigger break is the difference between a hit and a miss. Dry fire will teach you muscle memory at breaking the trigger without tensing the rest of your body. You have to stay relaxed, nothing moves but your finger.

    Best of luck at your first match...
     

    brianf

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    also throw in some dry firing with the lights off and plugs in. when i was shooting Fclass you would be amazed how much you learn about your rifle when there is nothing else to focus on.
    sound of the firing pin, does it change.
    does anything hang up etc
    with nothing to focus on but the trigger you be surprised how much better you will know when the break will happen.
    also not sure if i missed it but see what the weather is going to be like and make sure you practice with those clothes on.
    getting a good position is one thing, getting a good position wearing a rain suit that might not fit right is something totally different.
    if your going to run a course with a bunch of gear make sure it doesnt take forever to set up or put it away for the next shot.
    nothing worse than forgetting half of your shit on the last stage.

    also plan to suck the first few times your out there so you dont get pissed at yourself.
     

    AHart76

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    I am fully prepared to take last place! Lol! Loving all the advice, really giving me a good direction to go in. I downloaded a shot timer app on my phone, start with some 10 shot drills on a single target. 120 seconds maybe? Or would a shorter time restraint be better? Try doing that in different positions off of chairs or what not. We farm so I have access to a wide variety of different awkwardly shaped objects around. Seem like a good starting point?
     

    brianf

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    yup, the more uncomfortable the position the better to train with.
    dont get caught up in the time, like everything else the speed will come.
    when using a timer initially,try with out it to see your natural cadence.
    then put the timer on and see if you speed up or slow down.
    that will help calm the nerves with practice
     

    AHart76

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    About to go do a little practice now! Mostly just getting in and out of certain positions, and just seeing how different sitting, kneeling, standing positions feel. I just ordered a SAP sling and Weibad Pump Pillow(been meaning to for some time, just finally had this as a real good reason!) so when those come in they will definitely be a big part of my training as I have limited time to prepare for this match. Don’t ya love a good time crunch!
     

    NateVA

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    I NEED THAT I.O.T.A.!! Where does one fine one tho? I have a Vortex PST 6-24x50. A quick google search and all I could find were reviews, no place that had em for sale. That thread was from 2013, I wasn’t sure if I could still contact that guy through that email?

    You have to email him if you want to contact. I bought an IOTA from him about 3 weeks ago so everything should still be good to go.