Recommendation for best iphone App for storing reloading data, rifle dope, shot log, etc?

ReaperDriver

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  • Sep 5, 2009
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    I'm trying to find the best app for what the thread titles is asking, a one stop shopping location to store and organize reloading data, dope for each rifle and each cartridge, and so on. I'm doing a lot of this on an Excel spreadsheet on my laptop - but wanted something on the phone that I can use anywhere if I don't have access to my laptop or paper shooting log.

    Thanks!
     

    nn8734

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  • Feb 26, 2013
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    Searching the App Store I found two that appear interesting:

    “Load Data” and “Reloading Assistant” they are 1.99 and 3.99 respectively.

    I’m sure there are others but those two were towards the top.
     

    spife7980

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    I made an album in my phones photos for each barrel. I take a pic of my case dimensions for each firing, I have all the target pics etc. it’s the easiest way I’ve come across. Easier than trying to transcribe a picture to a spreadsheet.
    F9A35ADD-06E3-4368-98C0-01996F72C108.png


    Amd I use geoballistics for the dope.
     

    308sako

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  • Feb 15, 2008
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    Crayola, the big box...

    For my rifle logs I use a word document with salient pictures imbedded. Cartridge and chronograph data goes to excel. For the most part I am beginning to think that there is too much noise not enough clarity.

    Perhaps the answer is the question: What do you really need to know?

    Well kidding aside, that is what I am asking myself these days.

    YMMV
     
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    TriggerJerk!

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    I created databases in Filemaker for reloading info and DOPE. I think that is the only way to capture information like you would in book form. Works well, but requires the software, which is not cheap, and it does not run on Android at this time. YMMV.
     

    Wiillk

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    After loosing about three years of data in a computer crash with a backup system that also failed me, I am using paper for my primary data storage. Lyman makes a pretty good booklet style recording system, but I may rework it to record data by individual cartridge rather than date loaded.
     

    Long Range 338

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    International Barrels (IBI) came out with a free app that I believe does everything you want. It’s called Shotcounter
     

    st1650

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    Bump. I am currently using a mix and match of paper and excel but I was thinking of building a SharePoint Online multi list and a PowerApps for iPhone/android but it’s a lot of work to make it offline friendly.

    Would be nice if StrelokPro had some kind of datalogging feature
     

    MadDuner

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    I just put it into the factory Notes app on the phone.
     

    memilanuk

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    For my rifle logs I use a word document with salient pictures imbedded. Cartridge and chronograph data goes to excel. For the most part I am beginning to think that there is too much noise not enough clarity.

    I've been doing something similar using Google Docs and Google Sheets. The 'narrative log' i.e. what/why I was trying to accomplish, and my interpretation of the results, goes in Docs. The numbers go in Sheets. Fairly straightforward to copy-pasta things like graphs, tables, etc. from Sheets into Docs as needed to give perspective to the narrative. I can access the data from my main PC laptop in the house, and in the shop or at the range using my Chromebook or a tablet - or a phone, if I really need, though doing any kind of data entry on that pretty much sucks. I'm assuming something similar would be doable using Office365?
     
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    SienaNixon

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    I can only recommend the Android app. BallisticARC is a magazine for competitive shooters. Users can create rifle profiles, range maps, and other data. Honestly, I'm not the coolest gunsmith on the planet, and there are things in this app that I haven't even heard of before. Bluetooth support for weather and atmospheric devices and even integration with Google Maps for set distances is also available. The pro version is a bit more expensive, but most reviewers think it's worth it. But you can see a review of the app for starters. I look at wild card city vip gifts reviews, even on online slots. Good luck finding the app.
     
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    acudaowner

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    or
    or both
    and probably a bunch of others that do the same thing
     
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    OkieMike

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    After loosing about three years of data in a computer crash with a backup system that also failed me, I am using paper for my primary data storage. Lyman makes a pretty good booklet style recording system, but I may rework it to record data by individual cartridge rather than date loaded.
    Ditto, sort of. I didn't lose info from a techtronic crash, I was just disorganized. Very frustrating when you go back to revisit old data and it isn't there... Or you failed to note the best performance and have to run the test again.

    My chronograph links directly to my phone... But I have learned to print off the stats for each shooting session... I staple the stats to the target, along with the load data index card that I made up when I loaded the ammo. When I shoot I am usually in the habit of noting which powder charge performed "best" by circling it on the index card... But it's nice to read that and physically look at the holes in the paper to verify those results.

    I spent part of the last weekend matching everything up and organizing it. Found some pretty nice results I had forgotten about... The plus side is now I can share them and maybe help someone else out.

    Mike
     
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    Wiillk

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    I guess I'm outdated. I use a small notebook for each rifle and store my load data in it. Keep the notebooks on my reloading bench.
    ME TOO! Having previously done a lot of coding, I find that the more involved operating systems become, the more difficult it is to build simple back up programs. Under the old MS-DOS, it was easy to write a simple app that ran a back up, easy, automatic and complete. How, the best one can do is try to download it to a CD-ROM disc or pray the “cloud” does not disapate. Not Good. Paper is not perfect but even wet paper can be read (till it drits)
     
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    acudaowner

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    I also am a huge fan of paper copies of all my information from load data , to range card , weather . it's cheap and so am I also it's batteries last a lot longer than electronics just laminate the important stuff .
     

    kentuckyMarksman

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    ME TOO! Having previously done a lot of coding, I find that the more involved operating systems become, the more difficult it is to build simple back up programs. Under the old MS-DOS, it was easy to write a simple app that ran a back up, easy, automatic and complete. How, the best one can do is try to download it to a CD-ROM disc or pray the “cloud” does not disapate. Not Good. Paper is not perfect but even wet paper can be read (till it drits)
    I'm also a software developer. I like to leave the technology stuff at work, hence the hand written load books.