Hunting & Fishing Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

Alan Griffith

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

168 gr TTSX 300 WSM, 8-1/2' Alaska Tundra Grizzly, 157 yds. First broadside shot, through and through. Split second later second just an inch or two higher. Hit the spine and stopped under the hide on the far shoulder.
180ttsxbearbullet.jpg

AlanwithDanielMcPeak2008Grizzly2-1.jpg


Alan
 

Tomcat088

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

I've seen some requests for some Berger Hunting VLD's. This is the only one that I've recovered from an animal. It was from a Merino ram at 150 yards from a .300 WSM. I don't know the exact velocity (don't have a chrono), but when I have the dope and conditions match what I'm shooting in, it's always around 3,050 fps or so. He wouldn't turn broadside, and was on just a slight angle facing me. I center punched him through the sternum and it passed through and was found on the right side just in front of the leg under the hide. These bullets are what I'd consider quite "explosive". I've hit a small doe at 368 yards with one, only caught 1 rib behind the front shoulder. The exit wound was about the size of a coffee can. Never recovered the bullet, but the lungs were liquified and no piece of the heart larger than a dime was found. Here's the ones from the ram.

190BergerVLDsheep.jpg

190BergerVLD2sheep.jpg

190BergerVLD3sheep.jpg


For those interesting in the shot, here's a video on youtube. It wasn't much of a "hunt" (so no flaming), just a quick free kill run after a friend's brother no showed. The video will give you an idea of how they perform in hunting conditions. I had the horns mounted since it was my first ram, so didn't want to damage the skull, lol.
<object width="425" height="350"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/rNsJeqKB_cw"></param> <param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/rNsJeqKB_cw" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"> </embed></object>
 

trident1982

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

Just finished up a complete 500rd evaluation of the Barnes factory loaded 55gr. TSX .223 load...velocity measure through three lengths of barrels, groupings @ 100yds, LR effectiveness to a distance of a bit shy of 800yds, and then finally as the pics denote below, examining the ballistic effects...I need to write it all up finally now that I just shot the last 20 rds @ 605yds on steel yesterday.

This load and specifically these light .223 TSX bullets are flat out awesome and some of the neatest projectiles Ive ever shot extensively.

SANY0017-1.jpg


IMG_4206-1.jpg


1zyedfs.jpg

33lds20.jpg

2h81kbk.jpg


eta...I just read that the original request was for one's recovered from game, that said...I think some might have interest in those pics show I will leave them unless I need to remove which is ok.
 

Insayn

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

325 grain Hornady LeverEvolution from a Black Bear, shot left chest, recovered at the right rear rump under the hide.

45_70_001.sized.jpg
 

Garvey

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

.308 Win 165 gr. Sierra Game King Spire Point

110 yards at a Texas whitetail, entry front right quarter pannel, recoved on the left rear flank just under the hide.

Weighs 142 gr. now and is .75" diameter.

165SGKSPExpansion01.jpg


165SGKSPExpansion02.jpg
 

KYpatriot

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Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Bill Larson</div><div class="ubbcode-body">This is a good thread..... could make alot of hunters happy in the future and alot less game lost.I took some pics ( can`t seem to get them posted )of 2 bullets I recovered from a 200# WT shot at 35 yds. with a 30-06...into the chest..the bullets performed well as far as expandsion.. but niether bullet went through the deer... each were recovered just under the hide on the opp. side....can`t believe they would`nt go thru... so the deer absorbed tons of energy...???.. he took 1 leap and was done... but why was`nt he blown rite off his feet absorbing that kind of thrust...???
bill larson</div></div>

Probably because energy doesn't kill, it's the loss of oxygen due to zero blood pressure that kills. I have seen nothing from my hunting experience indicating that hydrostatic shock or excess energy has any incapacitating effect whatsoever. I have seen deer directly heart shot with a fist sized exit wound breaking the off shoulder run until the oxygen in the brain is used up.

I like to have enough energy to fully expand the bullet and also exit.
Good thread. I think bullet performance is more important than caliber in hunting performance.
 

coldboremiracle

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KYpatriot</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I think bullet performance is more important than caliber in hunting performance. </div></div>

    Accuracy is even more important than bullet performance, as you mentioned, its the loss of blood pressure that will do them in.
     

    Niles Coyote

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: coldboremiracle</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KYpatriot</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> I think bullet performance is more important than caliber in hunting performance. </div></div>

    Accuracy is even more important than bullet performance, as you mentioned, its the loss of blood pressure that will do them in. </div></div>

    Or the inability to form a vacuum.
     

    M700

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    I haven't recovered many bullets from game. Most of the time they go right on through. Typically I hunt with Nosler Partitions or Ballistic Tip bullets.

    Recovered this one from a mule deer. It was a 115 gr Berger VLD at nearly 3200 fps from my .25-06 rifle. Retained weight of the bullet was a mere 33 grains, but the buck sure was dead.

    IMG_0539.jpg


    IMG_0541.jpg


    I've got lots of other expanded bullets - but they were recovered from testing, since I couldn't get game animals to catch them!

    Regards, Guy
     

    Bob7608

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    i see some meat attached to that bullet! nice pictures
     

    knockemdown

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KYpatriot</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Probably because energy doesn't kill, it's the loss of oxygen due to zero blood pressure that kills. I have seen nothing from my hunting experience indicating that hydrostatic shock or excess energy has any incapacitating effect whatsoever. I have seen deer directly heart shot with a fist sized exit wound breaking the off shoulder run until the oxygen in the brain is used up.

    I like to have enough energy to fully expand the bullet and also exit.
    Good thread. I think bullet performance is more important than caliber in hunting performance. </div></div>

    KY, I realize you were referencing deer in your quote, but I'd have to disagree with you on hydrostatic shock or excess energy having an incapacitating effect on an animal.

    To illustrate that point, WATCH THIS VIDEO INTRO VIDEO This is my friend, shooting his .17Predator wildcat on coyotes. He's pushing a 30gr bullet @ ~4100fps. Its obvious to see how that speedy little bullet instantly transfers it's 'energy', resulting in near immediate incapacitation. Although clinical death may take a few more seconds, for all intensive purpposes, those coyotes are as good as dead when they ground check upon bullet impact.

    I have the same .17 cal. wildcat, and many other coyote hunters shoot warp speed bullets from 'sub' calibers because of their fur friendly nature and near freakish bang/flop terminal effect on coyotes. Upon skinning, it is obvious that massive internal hemmoraging occurs since the chest cavity contents slosh around like Jello inside. But there's gotta be something other than internal bleeding that locks a coyote up in midstride, no? Wouldn't that have to be the energy released by the bullet itself?


    Not arguing, just for conversation...
     

    KYpatriot

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    Knockemdown, good discussion, but I don't want to hijack a good thread. I'll start another thread in this section about that topic because it is an interesting topic. On with the pictures...
     

    knockemdown

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    roger that!
    To get back on track, here's a 162 Amax recovered from a mature whitetail doe, under the offside skin. Took three deer between 6-700, and the other two were pass-thrus...
    deer2011017.jpg
     

    coldboremiracle

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    Ok, lets keep this thread on track, if anyone has forgotten, it's about bullets recovered <span style="color: #FF0000">FROM AN ANIMAL</span> that we are looking for. For the purpose of evaluation for personal hunting suitablilty.

    Here is another one recovered yesterday from a mulie, a .308 Hornady 165 BTSP Interlock. Velocity around 2800 and impact at 228yds, jacket separated, core exited shoulder left.
    IMG_1107.jpg
     

    MikeeBooshay

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    OK these four 400 grain TSX are from a 416 Rigby, out of a Cape Buff. Top two are shot from about 100 yards, and were recovered from the off side, just under the hide. The bottom two were the coup de grace, shot thru the spine into the chest area, and were found under the hide in the brisket area. No missing petals, still 400 grains of bullet there.

    IMG_0732_zps8b276276.jpg


    Would like to have had the Barnes Banded Solids from the elephant, but they were a pass thru, both were head shots, thru the brain. About five feet of spongy bone, those things are amazing at penetration, and are why you use TSX, not solids on buffalo.

    Just finished browsing this thread. Wow, lots of cores and jackets seperated, in "hunting" bullets. Think I'd rethink choice of bullets before betting an expensive hunt on that.
     

    Hondo64d

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    Here's a 130gr Accubond launched at 2850...

    IMG_0373.jpg


    Recovered from under the gristle shield on the far side of this boar.

    IMG_0340.jpg


    The boar measured 60" from the tip of his nose to the base of his tail and 32" from the bottom of his hoof to the top of his shoulder.

    Here's a 240gr Hornady XTP launched from a Marlin 1894.

    PC010001.jpg


    PC010002.jpg

    ...recovered from under the hide of this pig:

    JoshandRedBoar3.jpg


    John
     

    Cinch

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    105 Amax from a 6x47 Lapua. 400 yard antelope shot in the mouth. Went through the back of his head and was just under the hide near his flank. Weighs 39gr.


    IMAG1162_zps557d1b74.jpg
     

    Zen Archery

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    125 gr. spear @ 45 yds (found in dirt)
    300 Blk

    565B422A-F342-49CF-832F-3F8F8D275438-2164-0000019A38829BAA.jpg
     

    knockemdown

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    7WSM, 162gr Amax 2970fps.
    547yds, bang/flop. Quartering to impact forward of right shoulder. You can see the Amax lumped under the offside pelt, just above the ele. turret.
    hunting2012046.jpg

    recovered bullet weighed 71.4gr.
    44% weight retention...
    hunting2012051.jpg
     

    c_bass16

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Tomcat088</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've seen some requests for some Berger Hunting VLD's. This is the only one that I've recovered from an animal. It was from a Merino ram at 150 yards from a .300 WSM. I don't know the exact velocity (don't have a chrono), but when I have the dope and conditions match what I'm shooting in, it's always around 3,050 fps or so. He wouldn't turn broadside, and was on just a slight angle facing me. I center punched him through the sternum and it passed through and was found on the right side just in front of the leg under the hide. These bullets are what I'd consider quite "explosive". I've hit a small doe at 368 yards with one, only caught 1 rib behind the front shoulder. The exit wound was about the size of a coffee can. Never recovered the bullet, but the lungs were liquified and no piece of the heart larger than a dime was found. Here's the ones from the ram.

    190BergerVLD3sheep.jpg


    </div></div>

    Mine look to have performed the same as yours. Mine was a similar entrance as well. 485 yds quartering towards me. Center punched through the throat liquefied the lungs and embedded between the last two ribs on the far side.

    IMAG0882_zpsbf96d2df.jpg

    IMAG0881_zps5d84f820.jpg

    IMAG0880_zps9823aa38.jpg

    IMAG0879_zps0a78b093.jpg
     

    LawDog101

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    Here is the 130 Hornady Soft point that my son used to take a 150# Texas White Tail buck. Distance was 230y. Bullet entered 3" above belly turned up slightly and went thru left shoulder, lodging just under skin

    C-Bullet.jpg


    Weight retention was 70%, which I consider to be awesome.

    LD
     

    c_bass16

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LawDog101</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    Weight retention was 70%, which I consider to be awesome.

    LD </div></div>

    Care to explain? I have never understood why that single attribute is good UNLESS you're hoping to achieve a complete pass through. In that case, it's good because the mass is needed to retain velocity through tissue and exit. (usually desired for game that may require tracking, as this gives you two holes for blood to exit)
    If the bullet stays inside your animal, I don't know what added features weight retention is giving you.

    Just curious.
    Thanks
     

    LawDog101

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    By my field research, the weight retention is important so that the energy is displaced entirely within the animal versus a bullet that blows up when it enters or just passes through. I am no expert but the wound channel was wide on the deer above and vaporized most of the heart and lungs. If the bullet had come more apart then the energy would be displace through the animal.

    Case in point, the 65gn sgk my son shot a doe with. It went in and did damage but major portions of it blew up when it entered. Didnt appear to have focused the energy.

    Again, just my field experience.

    LD
     

    coldboremiracle

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    Im no physicist, but that doesn't make sense. If a bullet retains the weight and passes through, much of its energy is 'wasted'. Whereas if the bullet comes apart, and all the pieces remain inside the animal, ALL of the energy is transferred to the animal.
     

    Advokaten

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LawDog101</div><div class="ubbcode-body">By my field research, the weight retention is important so that the energy is displaced entirely within the animal versus a bullet that blows up when it enters or just passes through. I am no expert but the wound channel was wide on the deer above and vaporized most of the heart and lungs. If the bullet had come more apart then the energy would be displace through the animal.

    Case in point, the 65gn sgk my son shot a doe with. It went in and did damage but major portions of it blew up when it entered. Didnt appear to have focused the energy.

    Again, just my field experience.

    LD </div></div>

    Cool, field experience that defies physics and logic.

    now back to the more regular programming/Chris
     

    LawDog101

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    I could give a shit what your Swedish ass has to say. I got asked a question and based on the fact that I have had my hands on the deer, I made an assessment.

    I have no doubt that my physics may be off but I am looking at practical hands on experience.

    My feeling is that the weight retention and staying together is better for knockdown and better for quick kills than say a varmint bullet that explodes on impact. Thinking that displacing the energy is not has good as focused energy.

    Just my .02. Take it leave it. Especially you, euro trash.

    LD
     

    Advokaten

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    IMAG0824.jpg


    105 A-max, 6XC @ 920 m/s used to cull a fallow deer, that had been struck in an auto accident, one rear leg broken, shot was @75 meter, behind the shoulder, about 55 grains worth of bullet remaining, shrapnel exited but no larger part of the bullet DRT.

    On grallock it was found that the lungs, heart and liver were completly liquified.

    LD- do keep your derogatory remarks to yourself, or rather take a physics class and return to explain focused energy to me/us.

    /CHris
     

    c_bass16

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    I'm afraid I'm with ColdBore and Sweedish Guy on this one.

    If the bullet passes through...the energy saved by weight retention is wasted. No way to dispute that.
    That's what some guys want and thats why they choose bullets like Barnes Tripple Shock. They do not shrapnel, they hold together, retain about 80-90% of their energy (while doubling in diameter) and in turn, will usually pass through the animal so that you'll have a blood trail a toddler could follow.

    However, if your bullet holds together in one piece...and my bullet blows into 10 pieces...but BOTH stay inside the animal...they are delivering the exact same amount of energy.
    The energy from your bullet might stay in an area 5" across because your bullet held together,(it's more focused in one area) but mine simply destroys more tissue inside due to the shrapnel effect. Usually an area 10-15" across.

    You're "CASE IN POINT" statement about your sons bullet not causing enough damage is moot, because he's using a 65gr bullet compared to your 130gr bullet compared to my 190 gr bullet.
    His bullet killed the deer, no question, but ask 100 people and 75% will tell you that's on the light side for big game. I've taken quite a few with 75gr bullets, but that's as low as I'm willing to go.
    Not saying it's inadequate...just saying its on the light side.

    It seems like what you are hoping for, is that you're bullet will hold together long enough to damage more organs as it passes through. Perhaps going through from the front and staying together long enough to take out the heart, lungs and stopping in the liver. As for a broad side shot...both are going to make the distance from ribs to ribs with ease.

    I'm counting on a bullet entering about 3-5" and exploding with such force that I don't want a softball size hole through the lungs...I want to find jello and blood globs where lungs had once been.

    I do not dispute that IF YOU WANT A PASS THROUGH in order to get a blood trail out both sides...then a bullet that holds together well is what you want. But that doesn't sound like what you want.

    I would be willing to bet that your bullet looks the way it does, because it entered soft tissue, as opposed to hitting solid bone, tough cartilage or thin bone like a rib. It held together because the soft tissue slowed it's velocity prior to it coming in contact with the shoulder on the far side.

    Send that bullet directly through a shoulder and I would bet you find pieces of copper everywhere.
     

    knockemdown

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    As a parallel to the importance of shot placement on bullet terminal performance, I will share this.
    A week after I took the buck in this thread (547yds, recovered 162 Amax, 44% weight retention), my buddy got behind my rifle and made a similar shot on another buck. Distance was comparable (516yds) to my bang/flop, same rifle, same load.
    This deer, impact was broadside/slight quartering away. Impact was mid ribs, pencil entry with golfball sized exit behind aft shoulder. However, without encountering significant bone other than ribs, the 162Amax blew right on through. The deer hobbled 50yds downhill & piled up. Plenty of energy left in that Amax, after it passed through. The deer reacted as if hit with a broadhead...

    Safe to say that bullet placement sure has alot to do with how these 'match' bullets perform on game animals. These 162 Amaxs are 3 for 5 on pass-throughs with whitetails from 500-700yds. The two recovered had similar weight retention. Enough so that I sure ain't scared about breakin' one down with a shoulder shot.
    Interesting discussion...
     

    c_bass16

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    I'm 100% with you on the performance based on the placement.

    The 190VLD that I had shown, entered the throat area quartering toward me, traveled more than 20" through tissue before implanting between the ribs on the far side. It hit some form of bone as the entrance hold had bone fragments everywhere...but I don't know what bone it was. This was at a range of 485 where velocity had dropped to nearly 2150 fps.

    The exact same bullet/rifle combo was used to take my doe last year at a mere 125 yds. The bullet entered the side of the head about 1" away from the ear hole and did not exit. The bone was hard enough that the bullet completely exploded, rupturing the skull into who knows how many pieces...but the bullet didn't come out. I was expecting near complete decapitation at that range. It looked like it was shot with a 22lr.
     

    coldboremiracle

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    This really is a great discussion, and the reason I started this thread in the first place. I see no problem with weight retention and pass through shots, but I dont see a problem with the alternative either. I have shot many deer, elk and antelope with many different bullets, and regardless of bullet type, I am always surprised by performance. Some times they blow right through, other times they explode on impact. Either way I have never seen it fail to kill the animal in question.
    I've seen 75 Vmax's blow through both shoulders on a doe, I've seen 180 SST's blow up just on the inside of a shoulder leaving a coffee can sized hole, I've seen 175 SMK's blow through a deer diagonally for some 24 inches without spending much weight. In these and many other cases the animal dropped dead. It's for these reasons I've become of the opinion that hunter's use whatever they are comfortable with. I've said it before; almost any bullet, in almost any caliber, will kill most big game animals if put in the right spot. The four pages of this thread are proof of that.
     

    coldboremiracle

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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LawDog101</div><div class="ubbcode-body">
    I have no doubt that my physics may be off but I am looking at practical hands on experience.</div></div>
    Your doubting is well founded.
    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LawDog101</div><div class="ubbcode-body">

    My feeling is that the weight retention and staying together is better for knockdown and better for quick kills than say a varmint bullet that explodes on impact. Thinking that displacing the energy is not has good as focused energy.
    </div></div>
    Again Im not a Doctor or physisist, but if I had to describe "knockdown" power (hardly a scientifical term), I would say this: The ability to transfer a lethal amount of energy to one or more vital organs." Now, said organs could be the brain hit with a .22. As we all know that is plenty of energy <span style="font-weight: bold">when placed in the proper spot</span> to kill the average big game animal. We also know that a Buick broadsiding a deer also provides enough energy to destroy/render inoperative an animals vital organs. Some where in between lies our question and answer. I'll try and think of the simplest way to describe it. If I have a nail driven through my hand with exactly 200lbs of force (either by a nail gun or particle accelerator, what ever its hypothetical) it will obviously blow through my hand like it wasn't even there, bones or not. Damage will depend on how and where it hits. Now, if I take a quarter, who for the sake of argument weighs the same as the nail, and drive it through my hand with the same 200lbs of force, you can imagine the damage will be far more severe. And the quarter may not even make it through, thus transferring all its 200lbs. Pounds per square inch, is one way of looking at it. 100lbs on 12 inches sitting on your chest would be very uncomfortable, 100lbs on 1/8in would punch right through you to the floor. Much the same way a bullet pierces an animal, if all the bullets energy is focused on a .308ish sized hole and pushes right through an animal, you will have a nice wound channel with a hole at either end of it where blood convieniently flows toward the ground. The speed and size of the upset bullet as well as tissue encountered will determine the severity of said wound channel. But the bullet itself continues on the warpath with plenty of energy left to do harm. But if the very same bullet comes apart into two or more pieces and all come to rest inside the animal, then ALL the energy is transfered to the animal. Now depending on where the bullet hits will determine how well it kills, you can transfer quite a bit of energy into a set of Elk hams and still not kill it, just ask my brother in law. But even a little bit of energy transfered to the right spot (brain,heart,lungs,ect.) will do the trick. And if you spread the energy across most or all of the vitals (via fragmentating bullet) then you are better off than had you simply driven a hole through lungs and or heart.
    This theory reinforces the long upheld standard that shot placement far outweighs bullet type and size.
    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: LawDog101</div><div class="ubbcode-body"> Just my .02. Take it leave it. Especially you, euro trash.</div></div> Must we result to namecalling?
     

    knockemdown

    suburban redneck
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    Minuteman
    Apr 10, 2007
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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    The nail/quarter analogy is an exaggerated way of describing a bullet's sectional density.
    IE, with the mass of an object and the energy behind it being equal, the object with larger frontal surface <span style="font-style: italic">(lower sectional density)</span> will transfer more of that energy, quicker, to the target.
    I've seen this happen with my .223 and 6x45 on coyotes. With a 65 gr bullet, the 6x45 (.223 necked up to 6mm) just seems to have more knockdown power. Both cartridges basically have the same case capacity, and net near the same velocity with 60-70gr bullets. But the larger frontal surface area of the 6mm bullet transfers more energy at impact, resulting in more reliable bang/flop performance. <span style="font-style: italic"> The larger surface area </span>of the .243" bullet = more efficient energy transfer at impact, comparatively, to a .224" of equal mass. The energy to drive both bullets is sufficient to insure penetration on a coyote sized animal at a reasonable distance, but the larger .243 caliber bullet delivers that energy more efficiently...

    Also, don't forget how a bullet's rpm could possibly affect it's terminal performance. Run a light for caliber bullet down a fast twist tube suited for heavy for cal. bullets, and you might be spinning that light bullet so fast that it might not hold together as well as it would from a slower twisted barrel.

    Example: take the same bullet and push it at the same velocity, out two different rifles, one with a slow twist barrel and one a fast twist. Likely, the bullet shot from the slower twisted tube (lower rpm) will penetrate further and hold together better, than the same bullet from a fast twist tube. And the thinner the bullet jacket, the more succeptible it will be to rpm related stresses...

    These generalities are just two more factors that potentially affect a particular bullet's terminal performance and reason for why one bullet might perform well for one, but not for another...
     

    bluezx14

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    Aug 31, 2008
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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: knockemdown</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The higher sectional density of the .243" bullet = more efficient energy transfer at impact, comparatively, to a .224" of equal mass. The energy to drive both bullets is sufficient to insure penetration on a coyote sized animal at a reasonable distance, but the larger .243 caliber bullet delivers that energy more efficiently...

    </div></div>
    You mean LOWER sectional density of the larger diameter bullet, therefore less penetration and more energy deposited into the animal, that is if they both get full penetration.
     

    knockemdown

    suburban redneck
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    Apr 10, 2007
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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bluezx14</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: knockemdown</div><div class="ubbcode-body">The higher sectional density of the .243" bullet = more efficient energy transfer at impact, comparatively, to a .224" of equal mass. The energy to drive both bullets is sufficient to insure penetration on a coyote sized animal at a reasonable distance, but the larger .243 caliber bullet delivers that energy more efficiently...

    </div></div>
    You mean LOWER sectional density of the larger diameter bullet, therefore less penetration and more energy deposited into the animal, that is if they both get full penetration. </div></div>

    You're right, I'll edit. I meant larger surface area, which equates to a lower sectional density. Thanks for pointing that out!
     

    ToolsoftheTrade

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    Jun 1, 2007
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    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    11192011barnesbulletrecovered.jpg

    111920116ptII.jpg

    6.5 grendel 140 yds barnes 100gr TTSX, pass through spine shot
     

    6.5BR

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    Oct 6, 2007
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    LA
    Re: Recovered Bullets-lets see 'em

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: GSSP</div><div class="ubbcode-body">168 gr TTSX 300 WSM, 8-1/2' Alaska Tundra Grizzly, 157 yds. First broadside shot, through and through. Split second later second just an inch or two higher. Hit the spine and stopped under the hide on the far shoulder.
    180ttsxbearbullet.jpg

    AlanwithDanielMcPeak2008Grizzly2-1.jpg


    Alan

    </div></div>

    Did you ever recover the bullet(s) that killed your Moose...from that 45 LC ??? Nice shot/hunt....both
    wink.gif
     

    Cinch

    Team GFY
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    Jul 11, 2008
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    Wyoming
    Recovered 130gr Berger HVLD. -100 yard neck shot on a large whitetail buck shot with a 260. Weighs 36.0gr.

     

    dworrel

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    Jul 9, 2010
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    I rarely say this but Guuud Gawwwwd Dang Diddly son, and people say I am a little to blood lusty!!! Hats off to ya whole new meaning to wack em and stack em.

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: elkhuntinguide</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: tansinator</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Elkhuntingguide</div><div class="ubbcode-body">All the pictured boolits were recovered from Elk I personally killed this year... </div></div>

    When you say you personally killed, does this mean you or your clients? That's alot of elk.
    smirk.gif
    </div></div>

    I mean me... So far on my contract this year (2009-2010) I have taken 373 Cow Elk, 16 Bull Elk, 27 Whitetail Does, 6 Whitetail Bucks, 19 Mule Deer Does, 4 Mule Deer Bucks, 20 Antelope Does, 5 Antelope Bucks, 7 Black Bears, 4 Mountain Lions, 117 Coyotes, 2 Badgers, 7 Skunks, 11 Raccoons, 27 Feral Domestic Dogs, 300 Feral Pigs, 1 Navajo and a partridge in a Pear Tree...

    This does not count the 43 Bull Elk, 51 Cow Elk, 4 Antelope Bucks, 4 Mule Deer Bucks, 3 Whitetail Bucks, 2 Black Bears and 2 Mountain Lions that my Hunters killed...

    So wipe that "Smirk" off your post...
    grin.gif
    </div></div>

    Strick9, curious to know what bullets/calibers you think "kill" better? What have you had problems with? Are there shots/bullets/cartridges you avoid?

    Experience like that is hard to come by. I have done some whitetail management where you shoot 60-100 deer in a year, but nothing to the magnitude you're talking about. Would love to hear more insight.
     

    tiNdvenTFHwMdqKW

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    Minuteman
    Apr 24, 2010
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    .45 on a really old old hard drive (don't make them like they used to) :rolleyes:
    Bullet1.jpg

    Recovered during clean up and just happened to notice they fit together.
     

    leid

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    Minuteman
    Feb 26, 2012
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    Brandon, MS
    Here are some recovered game-shots from whitetail. I hunt very dense areas of MS where exit wounds are a must for blood trailing. I view any bullet that does not exit as a failure so I don't have very many to show. Most recovered bullets are from raking shots but I have (2) below that went thru trees before striking the animal. It happens when you hunt "fast food" chasing a herd of does.



    200gr. Nosler Partition on right fired from .300 Win Mag: bullet went thru 6" tree before keyholing into whitetail. I got lucky.



    62gr. TSX fired from 10" Colt 5.56MM: bullet went thru small tree before keyholing into whitetail. Bullet was turned off axis by tree so no expansion due to shooter error. I got lucky again.

     
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