reloading?

BruntBronze

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Oct 8, 2019
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whats the consensus for learning to shoot better? Reloading precision for me is more expensive than crates of ammo. i have my 65 creedmoor for training, 65 WSM for fun, and a new 300 prc 60% done.

or should i train on a ar platform?
 

Memberberries

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Aug 8, 2018
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If you have limited time each week to spend on firearms related stuff and can afford to just buy ammo, you're better off spending it behind the rifle.

That said I reload because I can get better reloads than I can afford to buy as loaded ammo, also I load for odd calibers like my 257 Ocelot.
 

TheOfficeT-Rex

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  • May 19, 2019
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    Ok, you got me. I google'd that. Are you getting advertised velocities out of it? 3200 out of a necked up 223 case sounds ambitious.

    On topic-
    Just don't think you can reload to save money. If you're getting the accuracy you need out of factory offerings, there's very little added benefit for you.
     
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    SalomonQST99

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    Feb 19, 2020
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    Ok, you got me. I google'd that. Are you getting advertised velocities out of it? 3200 out of a necked up 223 case sounds ambitious.

    On topic-
    Just don't think you can reload to save money. If you're getting the accuracy you need out of factory offerings, there's very little added benefit for you.
    You won't save money, but it will allow you to shoot more with better customized ammunition.
     
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    Matt_KJ

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    May 27, 2019
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    IMHO, reloading is a long dark hole. There’s always another piece of equipment or trinket that makes your life easier or allows you to spend less time at a bench and more time out shooting.

    With today’s reamers you can call around and have a barrel cut for factory ammo and have the same results.

    Can you dial in a load? Sure, but how much time and money are you willing to throw at it?
     

    Memberberries

    Sergeant of the Hide
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    Aug 8, 2018
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    Ok, you got me. I google'd that. Are you getting advertised velocities out of it? 3200 out of a necked up 223 case sounds ambitious.

    On topic-
    Just don't think you can reload to save money. If you're getting the accuracy you need out of factory offerings, there's very little added benefit for you.

    I was able the speeds they have posted but I like the groups with sierra 90gr gamekings which settle in at a node at about 2975 out of my 18" ar barrel. I haven't run any 75gr to go for 3200 though.

    I agree that reloading won't generally save you money unless you shoot an odd caliber with really expensive factory loads. It's another aspect of the hobby that you have to do because you want to not because it's cheaper.
     

    gunsnjeeps

    Retired Swab Jockey
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    Dec 15, 2009
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    Just don't think you can reload to save money. If you're getting the accuracy you need out of factory offerings, there's very little added benefit for you.
    Depends on ammo price. Even 5.56 is 75 cents to a buck plus a round normally for good ammo. (Razor core Mk262, BHA Match, FGGM). Before COVID/Riots/Biden; 3 cents a primer, 9 cents for powder, 33 cents for a 77 gn SMK, 42 cents to reload a round. I'm still loading at 24 cents a round but loading from components I bought between, 6 and 15 years ago, MK118LR copy was in the 47 cent range.

    Pros: better ammo, more ammo for the price, used to be able to add availability.
    Cons: when did a box of 77gn SMKs go up to $165?, time to load about 20 hours for 1000 rounds (equipment dependent), component availability.

    I have agreed with one shooter who said buying ammo gave him family time because of his work schedule. I laughed at the guy who said he made enough that loading ammo cost him money because his time (based on hourly income) was worth more than he saved.

    Bottom line is that it is a decision you need to make knowing that you will buy equipment in the future that will save time. So you can break even on an amount of ammo, but when you buy more new equipment it has to earn its keep. For example 650 #2 with a Mr. Bulletfeeder will have to make about X quantity of rounds to break even at $775 for 1000 rounds. (.45 ACP Match ammo went up from $520 a 1000 a few years ago to $775 in February, so 77.5 cents a round.) Mix of new and used for $1200 machine plus component cost I don't have in front of me. I'll update it in a little bit.
     

    supraguy88t

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    Jul 2, 2019
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    For me reloading is another hobby all by itself. Don't do it for the money savings because by the time you tool up you are better off just buying ammo BUT, I believe I produce better ammo for my gun specifically and more importantly can product ammo when I need it rather than having to go find it on a shelf.
     

    accurate obsession

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    If your "crates" of factory ammo meet your accuracy expectations, go for it. I never liked being held to the mercy of the factory QC department. Rimfire ammo drives me nuts.
     

    DocRDS

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    Feb 21, 2012
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    Reloading gives you options and another hobby. Try finding 200+ gr 300 win mag ammo, even in good times--its all 180. 308 in 175/185 with barnes or berger bullets. And those are popular calibers.

    In good times match ammo is about a break even prospect--but of course you are limited to factory offerings.

    Right now--yeah supplies are tight, but once you get primers--no ammo shortage at my house. No Varget/Retumbo but my IMR4064 is doing me good and I even snagged some 4350 for my new creed. Patietence and any bullet I have wanted wanders in to stock.

    I found 308 Lapua brass at Cabelas.....
     

    Skookum

    Jack Booted Thug...Crushing the American Dream
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  • May 6, 2017
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    If you have limited time each week to spend on firearms related stuff and can afford to just buy ammo, you're better off spending it behind the rifle.

    That said I reload because I can get better reloads than I can afford to buy as loaded ammo, also I load for odd calibers like my 257 Ocelot.
    What is the difference between the 25 Ocelot and the 25 TCU?
     

    308pirate

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  • Apr 25, 2017
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    whats the consensus for learning to shoot better? Reloading precision for me is more expensive than crates of ammo. i have my 65 creedmoor for training, 65 WSM for fun, and a new 300 prc 60% done.

    or should i train on a ar platform?
    Sell everything except the 6.5 Creedmoor, set aside enough cash for one or two training courses, then blow the rest of it on ammo.
     

    BadDogPSD

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    With PRIME & Hornady match ammo being so good, I'd spend the $$ on some good training.
    Also dry practice/dry fire will make you a better shooter once you know you are doing things correctly.
     

    supraguy88t

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    Jul 2, 2019
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    With PRIME & Hornady match ammo being so good, I'd spend the $$ on some good training.
    Also dry practice/dry fire will make you a better shooter once you know you are doing things correctly.
    this is very true. knowing what I know now I would have taken more training early on. If you are good at reloading your ammo can be better than the factory stuff but practice and training is better us of time
     

    Memberberries

    Sergeant of the Hide
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    Aug 8, 2018
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    What is the difference between the 25 Ocelot and the 25 TCU?
    Mostly I think just overall length and the shoulder is maybe different. I'm having a hard time finding much online about the 25 tcu but I guess the Ocelot isnt much different. The TCU seems to be 2.5" which doesn't really fit in an AR mag.
     

    Skookum

    Jack Booted Thug...Crushing the American Dream
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  • May 6, 2017
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    Mostly I think just overall length and the shoulder is maybe different. I'm having a hard time finding much online about the 25 tcu but I guess the Ocelot isnt much different. The TCU seems to be 2.5" which doesn't really fit in an AR mag.
    The case is what makes the cartridge. Overall length depends on any number of variables.
     

    SmartDonkey

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    Oct 18, 2018
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    Reloading has saved me so much money.... The initial investment takes some time to pay off but does. People make it more complicated and expensive than it needs to be-, they buy way to many bullets and powders to try. And then they are always doing load development and switching things around.

    I've had a few barrels that are difficult (and tried some temperamental bullets) but most of the time I get an excellent load with trying 1 bullet and 1 powder- and then just a few tests to tweak it from there. And you don't have to go into all the crazy things either....

    When you could buy 223 for .30 cents it wasn't worth the time so I just used factory and saved brass.... But when you are getting into the $1.50 to $3 each you save money fast.
     
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