Rifle Scopes  Ring Height Info - How to Measure Correctly

Sainte70

Sergeant of the Hide
PX Member
Minuteman
Jun 19, 2018
112
32
New Orleans, La.
What would you put into the calculator for a Burris 25moa base on a Sendero barrel? That is the part that is a little more guesswork. Have a Steiner 4-16x56 the bell is 64.7mm. Have the choice of rings of 1 inch or 1.25. The 1 inch will be really close. Should probably get the 1.25? Whats a .3 gap.

Can you find 1.18” rings?
 

DJL2

Talon 6
PX Member
Minuteman
Oct 16, 2013
443
210
Georgia
How far in front the the front ring does the bell extend and what is the height differential between barrel and mount at that length? You can calculate the effective objective OD doing a little trig and, presumably, measure the latter. Pretty straight forward math, or you can just swag it - half a degree down angle isn’t going to make a huge difference unless you were extremely close to begin with.
 

barronian

Sergeant of the Hide
PX Member
Minuteman
Jan 18, 2019
302
182
Hummmm…. my problem isn't calculating the clearance for the objective end of the scope …. its guessing the clearance needed for the bolt action(plus finger) on the CZ455. Can mount the scope low, looks great … just cant use the gun ;-(
 

Noobshooter86

Private
Minuteman
Sep 2, 2018
19
3
Hey guys, does anyone know the ring height needed for a 10/22 tactical with vortex copperhead scope? 44mm 1" tube...thanks very much!
 

Fooddudebob

Private
Minuteman
Mar 22, 2019
12
1
Texas
Hey y’all, on ring height, I’m pretty new to shooting precision style rifles, and I have yet to shoot a match, in your option would it be better to have a higher mounting option for a more upright position, or would you prefer to have a lower mount? Thanks for taking my question
 

Sniper266

Sergeant of the Hide
PX Member
Minuteman
Apr 16, 2018
194
69
California
www.california.gov
Hey y’all, on ring height, I’m pretty new to shooting precision style rifles, and I have yet to shoot a match, in your option would it be better to have a higher mounting option for a more upright position, or would you prefer to have a lower mount? Thanks for taking my question

Your head position will ultimately come from your cheekweld. No matter if you are prone or standing, you will rest that cheekbone on your rifle stock.

That being said, having an adjustable stock to raise or lower the cheek rest is helpfull because you can generally get rings as high or as low as you need to. If your stock is not adjustable i would error on the higher side of scope rings. You can always build your stock up, but you cannot take material away. AR’s are a good example of needing higher rings.

I have also found that if the scope sits too high, the butt on the rifle will sit lower in my shoulder and on my collarbone instead of in my pocket.

So after all of this, i prefer scope rings that are as low as possible for scope clearance AND allow me to have proper cheekweld.

To answer your question, a slightly shorter length of pull will give you better eye relief as you go from prone, kneeling to standing and become more upright.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: zog

Fooddudebob

Private
Minuteman
Mar 22, 2019
12
1
Texas
Your head position will ultimately come from your cheekweld. No matter if you are prone or standing, you will rest that cheekbone on your rifle stock.

That being said, having an adjustable stock to raise or lower the cheek rest is helpfull because you can generally get rings as high or as low as you need to. If your stock is not adjustable i would error on the higher side of scope rings. You can always build your stock up, but you cannot take material away. AR’s are a good example of needing higher rings.

I have also found that if the scope sits too high, the butt on the rifle will sit lower in my shoulder and on my collarbone instead of in my pocket.

So after all of this, i prefer scope rings that are as low as possible for scope clearance AND allow me to have proper cheekweld.

To answer your question, a slightly shorter length of pull will give you better eye relief as you go from prone, kneeling to standing and become more upright.
Okay I really appreciate your expertise! That clears up quite a bit!
 

acudaowner

Old Salt
PX Member
Minuteman
Dec 26, 2018
4,274
2,936
thanks for that post on my own knowing nothing i have already purchased one 300 dollar or more larue mount that i cannon use it just put the scope so high from the cheek rest my chin was on the rest and still could not see through the scope and now local shops have me buying parts to change my rifle after buying mounts that again will not fit , the bell hits the rail on top of the gun i am hopeful that the taped pennies gave me the correct height measurement wish i had seen this post a few months ago could have saved 500 dollars if i had let my local gun shop have there way they would have me spending more . Just praying that these rings do the trick this time.
 

rugerlongrange808

Private
Minuteman
Apr 8, 2019
1
0
Getting your scope height is much easier than this...

Measure the outside diameter of the eye piece (D-EYE)
Measure the diameter of your bolt (D-Bolt)
Measure the distance from the top of the bolt to the bottom of the eye piece on the scope (D-X)

Scope Height = ( ( D-EYE / 2 ) + ( D-Bolt / 2 ) + D-x

No need to complicate it
 

BLDTYLRY

Sergeant
PX Member
Minuteman
Jul 21, 2011
853
133
WA State
I saw this and thought, this is a great way to measure.

American Rifle Company Rings



 
  • Like
Reactions: calamjn

DellaDog

Gunny Sergeant
PX Member
Minuteman
Feb 23, 2017
809
386
DFW, TX
I originally ordered the ARC Med for the ZCO 527 on a Defiance Deviant. The scope sat kinda high.
I used the penny method above and measured 4 pennies. Ordered the low rings and they fit perfectly.

The penny method works. (For ARC rings at least)
 

little_scrapper

Sergeant of the Hide
PX Member
Minuteman
May 31, 2019
460
292
How does one account for having a big head. I am a pretty big guy with a giant nugget. I cant keep my head straight, get proper cheek weld and see through the scope. With low rings I am forced to tilt my head to get my eye lower.

Unfortunately, when i built my rifles I didn't know any better and went as low as I could get.
 

calamjn

Sergeant of the Hide
Hessian
PX Member
Minuteman
Mar 1, 2018
191
80
Birmingham, AL
How does one account for having a big head. I am a pretty big guy with a giant nugget. I cant keep my head straight, get proper cheek weld and see through the scope. With low rings I am forced to tilt my head to get my eye lower.

Unfortunately, when i built my rifles I didn't know any better and went as low as I could get.

yeah, I know what you are talking about, I had the same issue. Although I will say head size isn’t really the issue. It’s how high you eyes are measured up from you cheek bone. Try first, building your shooting position properly, because that changes things, namely cheek weld. Mostly likely if you’re having to tilt you head to lay flat, your rings are too short. If your shooting position is correct and the rings are too short, whether prone or sitting bench rest, then you really only have a couple of options. First option is get higher scope rings. The second option is to get higher scope rings and build up your stock’s cheek/get an adjustable stock or chassis. What’s your setup right now? What stock, scope, base, and rings do you have?
 

little_scrapper

Sergeant of the Hide
PX Member
Minuteman
May 31, 2019
460
292
LaRue UU in 308. RATT Stock, With an Aero Precision Ultra Light mount holding a Vortex Crossfire II
 

nikonNUT

Gunny Sergeant
PX Member
Minuteman
  • Oct 6, 2019
    784
    1,936
    49
    The Range
    So I have a question regarding ranges being shot at. No I haven't done this but say you are shooting at 2000 yards and need to dial up 29 MIL aka 98 MOA. How much does this effect ring height? I didn't see it mentioned but it crossed my mind when suppressors were mentioned. It would suck to get rings or mounts that were great an 100/200/500 yards and then have that 2000 yard shot and have half the scope view obscured by the suppressor. The barrel on my rifle is pretty much a #8 contour 30" long with a Hybrid 46 hanging off the end so if the effect is a 38" barrel with a 1.57" diameter. As best I can tell it breaks down like this...
    top of rail to top of barrel = .520"
    difference between barrel and supressor = -.225-ish"
    mount height = 1.500"
    angular adjustment at full value (98MOA) for 30 (barrel)+7.8(suppressor)+5 (rail length) * tan.333 = .249"
    Bell diameter = 1.110"
    SO... .520 + (-.225")+1.500 = 1.795" -1.110 = .685" - .249" (angular adjustment) = .436" of clearance over the suppressor at distance. Is this close or an I over thinking it?
     

    Magz556

    Private
    Minuteman
    Sep 25, 2019
    1
    0
    Guys,

    Lately, on average of about 1 per day, I have seen quite a few posts (mostly from newbies) regarding questions about what ring height should be used. They usually request pics for comparison. For all new guys, there is a systematic way of calculating ring height that doesn't require more than a simple elementary school ruler. You measure 3 things:
    1. the height of the front of your base/rail from the barrel
    2. the height of your rings from the top of the rail to centerline
    3. the outside diameter of the bell of the scope (not the size of the objective lens)

    Here is the equation:

    [rail height + ring height] - [bell diameter x 0.5]

    If the value is positive, then your bell will clear the barrel. Ideally, you want that bell to be about 1/4" or less over the barrel. This will give you a tight cheek weld. Be sure to account for Butler Creek caps if you intend on using them.

    If you are using a 40mm objective, then you can use the lowest rings and bases available, as the bell will certainly clear the barrel with no problem. i.e. don't worry if the bell ends up being higher than 1/4" over the barrel.

    Hope this helps.

    mike

    Just another note. If you are using a scope base and/or mount/rings that have built in elevation, that may have to be accounted for in the case of very small clearance. To calculate this, we need to know the amount of elevation built into the mount/rings and/ or base, and the length from the end of the scope base to the end of the scope bell. Convert MOA into degrees, and then the equation is:

    Tan ? x length

    For example, if you are using a 20 MOA base, and the distance from the edge of the scope base to the end of the bell is 5". 20 MOA = 0.333 degrees, so:

    Tan 0.333 x 5 = 0.029"

    This means that you need an extra 0.029" of clearance in addition to the calculation above

    -mp
    👍