Suppressors Thread vs QD

300WSM

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Re: Thread vs QD

LL, why do you say QD is just ok on an AR ?
 

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  • Apr 12, 2001
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    Re: Thread vs QD

    I didn't say it was just ok, I said it was ok. Ars are generally shot inside 100 yards, even closer in most cases, so it's a non-issue.

    I said on a precision rifle the single point is better, which it is. They are shot further, and accuracy is the goal, less chance of errors with a single point, and a much better fit overall.
     

    RollingThunder51

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    Re: Thread vs QD



    "Why doesn’t AWC offer their suppressors in “Quick Detach”?

    Over the course of the last decade we too have watched as some suppressor manufacturers provide “quick detach” assemblies. We have given this some considerable attention here at AWC since 1986 when we first experimented with and produced product with “quick detach” (QD) features. What we found, and our customers confirmed about QD may surprise you.

    Threading on a suppressor remains less than 20 seconds, is the strongest, most precise and cleanest way to mount.

    QD is the number one problem concerning alignment and potential baffle strike.

    QD provides the poorest of gas seals under extreme conditions, degrading suppressor performance.

    QD is not as accurate on precision rifles as properly threaded assembly.

    QD units quickly “carbon up” creating considerable assembly/disassembly issues that threading does not.

    QD is actually QA (Quick Attach) as a suppressor may go on faster, but when that suppressor gets hot, it gets red hot, and is hardly QD.

    QD, with its requirement for the flash/compensator is heavier on the barrel.

    QD can use more than 2” of wasted suppressor space, causing additional weight.

    QD requires the operator to buy more proprietary gadgets for the end of every weapon that will have a suppressor mounted. Operationally, few of our Military and Police Clients have found a reason to need QD, referring to the whole process as being driven by the civilian market.

    In the end, in service, keep it simple as less to go wrong is always the best way forward."
     

    300WSM

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    Re: Thread vs QD

    I like my 762sd goes on my 308 easy and then goes onto my 223 easy. It's just as quiet as any 223 can I've heard. But a little longer. Duo purpose.
    smile.gif
     

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  • Apr 12, 2001
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    Re: Thread vs QD

    I like my 7.62SD just fine too, but owning that, the Surefire 762SS, the Shark, the Sandstorm, 4 Jet's, an Outback and Halo, I have to say, the single point cans are better.

    For the reasons posted above.

    In fact today I put my paperwork in the mail for a bought and paid for Ops Inc 12th... so I have a bit of time behind a couple. The worse offenders are the Knights in my opinion, they QD/QA, and are all over the place.
     

    Downrange1x

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    Re: Thread vs QD

    Thread me on anyday!! I have bth QD and thread-on, I'll take the threads anyday.They retain POI far more consistently than QD's and unless you are in and out of vehicles or urban CQB ops I couldn't justify the QD's. AWC doesn't need a QD they are just deadnuts accurate the way they are!!(2 Raiders, 2 Thundertraps, 1 Stalker) and I would take my Thundertrap or Raider over my AAC SPR or AAC 7.62SD. They just outperform them. I have an Elite Iron can on the way ,of course thread-on.Also my Gemtech Tundra is one wickedly quiet 9mm.
     

    Bacarrat

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  • Jan 22, 2007
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    Re: Thread vs QD

    QD should be more like QA. You aren't QDing anything when you have a few rounds through the suppressor. At least not with your bare hands.
     

    raptor99

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    Re: Thread vs QD

    I went with a quick detach because I wanted to be able to switch between my bolt gun and my AR-10. I like the looks of the flash supperssor for the AR-10 but other than that I wish I would have went with a screw on can.

    My main worry was the thread on shooting loose but I am so anal about checking it anyway so its a moot point. I had to send mine back to Gemtech because my groups were doubling in size with the supperssor on when it was on my AR-10. It worked great on the bolt gun but not the AR-10.

    I called Gemtech and told them about it and they had be send the upper in with the supperssor even though I told them it shot great on the bolt gun. They corrected the problem with the threads on my AR-10 and it is on its way back to me. NO CHARGE, you can't beat customer service like that!!!
     

    BookHound

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    Re: Thread vs QD

    A fast-attach (or whatever you want to call it) suppressor can have some advantages over thread-mount suppressors.

    Some "FA" suppressors use mounting systems that are available in a variety of internal thread patterns. Thus, you could use the same suppressor on a variety of suppressor hosts that have different thread patterns. For example, some "FA" .30-caliber suppressors have mounts available for standard .308 bolt-actions (5/8x24), metric FALs (9/16x24L), L1A1s (9/16x24R), HKs (15mm) and even 5.56 caliber hosts (most of which are .5x28). That gives the suppressor a lot of versatility and appeals to many users.

    Some thread-mounted suppressors can work themselves loose. This is often more an issue of how well the threads on the host are mated to the suppressor and is exactly why the better 'smiths will pretty much insist on having the user's suppressor when cutting threads on a host weapon. They want to get a tight, precision fit. This is also more common a problem on auto-loading host weapons that are fired at a higher cycle rate than your typical bolt-action rifle. I've seen a LOT of people putting suppressors on AR-15s. The vast majority of users were using typical non-custom AR barrels such as Sabre Defence, Bushmaster, Rock River Arms, LMT, Colt, etc. The threads on those barrels are cut to the looser end of the tolerances. In those cases a thread-mount suppressor didn't stay as tight on the barrel as would a "FA" suppressor with its mount properly installed on the host.

    Some users like having a flash suppressor or muzzle brake in place when not using the suppressor. I've seen this especially with military and LE users. In this case there is no need for a thread protector on the host either.

    Then you have suppressors like Ops Inc that are sort of a hybrid; neither "fast-attach" nor really thread-mount. The Ops Inc suppressors do not suffer from potential to loosen under use. Since they use a two-point mounting system the rear collar keeps the suppressor firmly in place. I've shot my personal 16th Model for years on a full-auto M4 and never had the suppressor loosen under use. The two-piece mounting system also leaks no gas whatsoever.

    Fast-attach and thread-mount solutions all have their place. For a dedicated bolt-action precision gun I prefer either a dedicated thread-mount suppressor or an Ops Inc. On an auto-loader that will see higher cycle rates of fire I prefer either a fast-attach or an Ops Inc.

    The point about having to pay additional $$ for mounts with the fast-attach suppressors is certainly a consideration. Most suppressor mounts are not cheap.

    One last consideration is that some mounting solutions for the "fast-attach" type may use a host mount that absorbs much of the weapon's blast and in doing so acts a bit as a sacrificial part. The mount wears out faster than the baffle core of the suppressor. This is true of mounts like the Ops Inc, SureFire and AAC brakes.

    Just like picking the right host weapon tool for the intended task, you should spend some time considering what suppressor features are most important to you.