Trying to identify the trigger on my Remington model 722

Calfed

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I'm trying to identify this trigger on my Remington 722/possibly model 40 rifle.

Anyone able to help?

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sandwarrior

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Pull it out of the stock and get some pics of that.

Not sure who, but seems we've seen this pic before about six months or so ago.

Another note, the bottom metal is weird. There seems to be an action screw in front of the trigger, not behind it like a 722 should have.
 
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Calfed

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Pull it out of the stock and get some pics of that.

Not sure who, but seems we've seen this pic before about six months or so ago.

Another note, the bottom metal is weird. There seems to be an action screw in front of the trigger, not behind it like a 722 should have.
I posted this rifle on several other forums about 3 months ago trying to identify it. It has "Remington" on the side rail, but no model number. Some opined that it was an early model 40, others a 722.

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It is a nice old rifle, with some interesting features, including an adjustable comb

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A heavy CR Hart barrel

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The rear action screw goes down from the top...

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NukeMMC

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    Since it isn't milled on the right side of the tang for the safety lever and has a straight, polished bolt handle, I would say 722. Since the rifle is a custom, you won't be able to tell until you pull the barreled action from the stock. It should be marked below the Remington stamp.

    If it is a solid-bottom, 40x. I don't think they made a 722 with a solid bottom.

    The trigger guard looks like a custom piece also, hence what is probably a wood screw from the front of the trigger guard and probably has a bolster in the rear of the casting that the rear screw taps into.

    Trigger looks like an old Canjar, adjustable for length of pull, engagement, overtravel and weight. You would have to pull the trigger guard to set the trigger on this rifle.
     
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    MOAxp

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    It is likely the Remington International or Harts copy of the same.
     

    Calfed

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    Since it isn't milled on the right side of the tang for the safety lever and has a straight, polished bolt handle, I would say 722. Since the rifle is a custom, you won't be able to tell until you pull the barreled action from the stock. It should be marked below the Remington stamp.

    If it is a solid-bottom, 40x. I don't think they made a 722 with a solid bottom.

    The trigger guard looks like a custom piece also, hence what is probably a wood screw from the front of the trigger guard and probably has a bolster in the rear of the casting that the rear screw taps into.

    Trigger looks like an old Canjar, adjustable for length of pull, engagement, overtravel and weight. You would have to pull the trigger guard to set the trigger on this rifle.

    It is a single shot.

    8pR2Jim.jpg


    I hate to pull it out of the the stock, but it may come to that.
     

    Calfed

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    It is likely the Remington International or Harts copy of the same.
    I got some feedback from a couple of people on other forums and I think you are right...probably a Hart. Pull is the lightest I've ever felt...a few ounces

    Is that RW Hart in Pennsylvania or the Hart barrel guys?
     

    NukeMMC

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    I got some feedback from a couple of people on other forums and I think you are right...probably a Hart. Pull is the lightest I've ever felt...a few ounces

    Is that RW Hart in Pennsylvania or the Hart barrel guys?
    Definitely a very early 40x action. You scored a gem there. The rest of the rifle is interesting, a novelty at best. Yank it out of that stock, sent it to Alex Sitman at Master Class Stocks to put it into a properly bedded piece of fiberglass and watch it shoot bugholes.

    The RW Hart Rifles isn't the same as the makers of this rifle. CR & PJ Hart was a benchrest rifle maker in the 50s/60s/70s. Clyde Hart was the founder of Hart Rfle Barrels and was a benchrest shooter. Normally the action would have an aluminum sleeve over it for benchrest. That rifle looks like one they were commissioned to build to a customer spec, but not for normal benchrest (.308?).
     
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    Calfed

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    Definitely a very early 40x action. You scored a gem there. The rest of the rifle is interesting, a novelty at best. Yank it out of that stock, sent it to Alex Sitman at Master Class Stocks to put it into a properly bedded piece of fiberglass and watch it shoot bugholes.

    The RW Hart Rifles isn't the same as the makers of this rifle. CR & PJ Hart was a benchrest rifle maker in the 50s/60s/70s. Clyde Hart was the founder of Hart Rfle Barrels and was a benchrest shooter. Normally the action would have an aluminum sleeve over it for benchrest. That rifle looks like one they were commissioned to build to a customer spec, but not for normal benchrest (.308?).
    Thanks, Nuke!

    I might eventually do that, but I love that old school stock.

    I shot it with my son last month and was impressed. The range that we shoot at has a number of ranges, to include an intermediate range of 300 yards. The closest shooting that they allow on that range is 150 yards, so that is where we started.

    My son shot this group at 150 yards with 175gr 7.62 x 51 FGMM. First shot was the 12 o'clock hole over the diamond. This was his first shot out of the rifle and I think the trigger pull surprised him. He put the next 4 rounds into the ragged hole a little to the right. There was a light left-to-right cross wind. The 4-shot group measures .458" ctc.

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    We moved the target down to 300 yards and I shot this 4 shot group. The group wasn't good, but the vertical dispersion was minimal. I believe that the light left-to-right breeze pushed the bullets around a little on their way to the target. The first shot was low-center in the red. I had put a black paster in the red area to provide a smaller aim point and that first shot clipped the bottom of the paster and knocked it off. The next two shots were over on the right and the last one was back in the red.

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    I think with a little practice and some handload develpment, this rifle can do better.
     
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    Thud

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    It's a Hart trigger.
    Hart supplied 40x triggers to Remington for br in the early days.
    I have the same trigger on a 40x.
     
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    Calfed

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    It's a Hart trigger.
    Hart supplied 40x triggers to Remington for br in the early days.
    I have the same trigger on a 40x.
    Thanks!

    Thud...is your 40X one of the very early ones based on the 722 action, or the later ones based on the 700 action?
     

    Calfed

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    Mine is based on the 722
    Does your 40X have the model stamped under the "Remington" stamp on the left side of the receiver?

    That is one of the frustrating things about this rifle...no model information on the receiver.

    Thanks for the tip on the stock. I am fascinated by that stock. The adjustable comb is really interesting. To adjust it, you loosen the two butt plate screws and then turn the adjustment screw on the bottom of the stock...then retighten the butt plate screws, making everything as tight as a tick.

    Z4lDCpm.jpg
     

    Thud

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    I think it's a very early 40x type. There is a book on Remington rifles. I don't have a copy.
    Try to contact Buch Lambert at Shade Tree Enginnering 9725242247.
    He know a lot about early Remingtons.
    He may be able to help.