Warrant? We don’t need no stinking warrant..

eca7891

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Edit.
After some thought.

The police have no obligation to come to your aid or stop any crime that is being committed.

The above statement has already been litigated.

Not bashing, just sayin’.
 
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BullGear

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    I knew a bounty hunter years ago and he was one of the most dangerous people I've ever seen. He was going to hurt the bail runner. It was an automatic thing. If the runner resisted or not, he was going to the hospital.
     
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    Blue Sky Country

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  • You are not police or any other legit local, state, or federal law enforcement agency? GTFO...

    "Open up or we'll kick it in!"...

    Okay... Kick it in, and see what you receive right after the door is compromised. It is either going to weigh around 150 grains and traveling at 2900 FPS, or 650 grains, with feathers and three razor sharp blades, traveling at 210 FPS... Depending on what I feel like grabbing. You will be standing right in that doorway, your position and silhouette available nice and bright for me, while I am somewhere deep inside the structure, shrouded in pitch black. And as soon as that door gives way as a result of YOUR actions, your "present" will be loosed. No verbal warnings, nothing. Good luck.
     
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    Blue Sky Country

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  • I knew a bounty hunter years ago and he was one of the most dangerous people I've ever seen. He was going to hurt the bail runner. It was an automatic thing. If the runner resisted or not, he was going to the hospital.


    Their ranks mostly consist of power tripping and egotistical sociopaths who cannot get into real law enforcement agencies due to not being able to pass either physical, psychological, or criminal background screenings. Think of Teague and the North Carolina Home Guard in Cold Mountain. These fuckers could not join the Army of Northern Virginia or a local regular unit because they cannot meet physical requirements or were a couple of screws short of a tool kit. But they still want to play soldier and lawmen, and rape and pillage while at it. Home Guard it is. And some people are just not impressed by it and could do something about it...
     

    kwityurbeachn

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    I didn't watch it but am assuming the bounty hunters busted in his house. To be honest I am torn on it. I have some strict rules for my techs. No equipment left in trucks. Some were paid to use their personal trucks. I would go to their hotels at night checking to see if my equipment was in the vehicle. Zero shits cared. 20k of my stuff is in your truck, either come down now and hand my stuff over or breaking the window. Am sure the bondsman need their bond the same way I needed my equipment to make money. 2x I had my equipment in vehicles unlocked. 1st time a thief ran off with 20k worth of stuff the 2nd time I took it out of dudes personal truck.
     
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    pmclaine

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    Clown show.......welcome to banana republic America.

    This is probably the best result possible that could have happened here......the other endings would have all been worse.....and even this one sucks.

    Tax payers in Buffalo gonna be paying.
     
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    pmclaine

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    I didn't watch it but am assuming the bounty hunters busted in his house. To be honest I am torn on it. I have some strict rules for my techs. No equipment left in trucks. Some were paid to use their personal trucks. I would go to their hotels at night checking to see if my equipment was in the vehicle. Zero shits cared. 20k of my stuff is in your truck, either come down now and hand my stuff over or breaking the window. Am sure the bondsman need their bond the same way I needed my equipment to make money. 2x I had my equipment in vehicles unlocked. 1st time a thief ran off with 20k worth of stuff the 2nd time I took it out of dudes personal truck.


    I think you need to invest in work vans that are covered under insurance if you are dealing with tools likely worth more than the employees car.

    That last fact alone should be a clue that perhaps your shit wont be given the care you yourself require of it.
     

    DarnYankeeUSMC

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    In your head
    Your screen name and your post are in conflict.
    I didn't watch it but am assuming the bounty hunters busted in his house. To be honest I am torn on it. I have some strict rules for my techs. No equipment left in trucks. Some were paid to use their personal trucks. I would go to their hotels at night checking to see if my equipment was in the vehicle. Zero shits cared. 20k of my stuff is in your truck, either come down now and hand my stuff over or breaking the window. Am sure the bondsman need their bond the same way I needed my equipment to make money. 2x I had my equipment in vehicles unlocked. 1st time a thief ran off with 20k worth of stuff the 2nd time I took it out of dudes personal truck.
    You'd break someone's window on their POV? Sounds like you're a real jewel to work for. Stalking around at night checking on your employees.....SMH.
     

    acudaowner

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    was always amazed at some of those shows how the repo people were never shot , run over or killed reposing a motorcycle gangs bikes and they just did nothing that's almost laughable . there is a reason revenuers stopped trespassing on people's property without police escorts in certain places you could disappear and never be seen again .
     

    1moaoff

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    Ughhhhh wtf

    If he posted the bond who knows whats in his contract with the bondsman? Dont know dont care but I think whoever signs for it and the accused give up some rights in the contract... probably a BS contract though.

    This entire thing is a shit show of the highest degree.
     

    eca7891

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    It was his brothers home they invaded.... not the guy out on bail.
     

    fdkay

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    The title of this thread is stupid.
    If a Bounty Hunter is seeking to arrest you, then there IS a warrant. They can not make warrantless arrests in an official capacity, though, like any citizen, they can make an arrest for a felony committed in their view. (really a detention until law enforcement arrives).
    Bounty hunters are private citizens, not government agents, the Constitution of the United States, for those that apparently don't know, limits what the GOVERNMENT can do, not a private citizen.
    Laws passed by the legislature, whether state or federal, limit was a citizen can do.
    As such, they are generally given a lot of latitude in entering domicles etc... to make an arrest.
    If you shoot one, you may not be charged with murder, but would certainly face the possibility of harboring a fugitive (or whatever your state penal code calls it) since, that person they are seeking to arrest HAS A FUCKING WARRANT.
     
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    DarnYankeeUSMC

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    So the state can use private citizens to enforce a court warrant? Those private citizens doing the will of the court can violate any laws to do so with immunity?
    The title of this thread is stupid.
    If a Bounty Hunter is seeking to arrest you, then there IS a warrant. They can not make warrantless arrests in an official capacity, though, like any citizen, they can make an arrest for a felony committed in their view. (really a detention until law enforcement arrives).
    Bounty hunters are private citizens, not government agents, the Constitution of the United States, for those that apparently don't know, limits what the GOVERNMENT can do, not a private citizen.
    Laws passed by the legislature, whether state or federal, limit was a citizen can do.
    As such, they are generally given a lot of latitude in entering domicles etc... to make an arrest.
    If you shoot one, you may not be charged with murder, but would certainly face the possibility of harboring a fugitive (or whatever your state penal code calls it) since, that person they are seeking to arrest HAS A FUCKING WARRANT.
    Did these assclowns have a search warrant for this house? Or was there just an arrest warrant for failure to appear?
     
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    kwityurbeachn

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    I think you need to invest in work vans that are covered under insurance if you are dealing with tools likely worth more than the employees car.

    That last fact alone should be a clue that perhaps your shit wont be given the care you yourself require of it.
    That is almost always the issue. People dont care. Some guys want to be contractors to make better money and i help a few out. I have comapany vehicles for employees.
     

    kwityurbeachn

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    Your screen name and your post are in conflict.

    You'd break someone's window on their POV? Sounds like you're a real jewel to work for. Stalking around at night checking on your employees.....SMH.
    Yeah my rules if you want to use my stuff. Obviously you have no idea what its like to work in the hoods. Im looking out for those guys too. If my stuff is stolen the tech is out of work till it is replaced. If it is a contractor he might lose 5k+ per week. Plus he has to pay for the stuff stolen. A fusion splicer is 10k, ribbon splicer is 15k and the otdr is 10 to 20k. One tech can have carry all of that and then some with hand tools that always run 1k a piece. Im sorry if you are offended but that is no easy pill to swallow. Staying in business is more important than a 200 dollar window. Imagine an ammo manufacturer employee has an expensive part stolen out of his pov that shuts the whole plant down for a month. You'd definately wished he had a boss keeping up with their shit.
     

    DarnYankeeUSMC

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    In your head
    There's plenty of trucks that are used with as much in value. There's vehicles designed to be secured. If your shit is that valuable then it seems appropriate to be able to secure it.
    Yeah my rules if you want to use my stuff. Obviously you have no idea what its like to work in the hoods. Im looking out for those guys too. If my stuff is stolen the tech is out of work till it is replaced. If it is a contractor he might lose 5k+ per week. Plus he has to pay for the stuff stolen. A fusion splicer is 10k, ribbon splicer is 15k and the otdr is 10 to 20k. One tech can have carry all of that and then some with hand tools that always run 1k a piece. Im sorry if you are offended but that is no easy pill to swallow. Staying in business is more important than a 200 dollar window. Imagine an ammo manufacturer employee has an expensive part stolen out of his pov that shuts the whole plant down for a month. You'd definately wished he had a boss keeping up with their shit.
    Change your rules to make the subcontractor have the vehicle to secure your tools. Possibly even require a sub to have a deposit for using your tools. There's better ways to go about the situation.
    No offense on my part. I just think it's funny that you are sneaking around at night checking doors.
     

    fdkay

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    So you didn't read your link? They did not have a warrant. They have a civil contract. They are not doing the will of the court. They are enforcing the contract. They can not enter any house they want because of suspicion.
    You suffer from an intentional refusal to understand.
    A bond revocation results in a warrant, if someones bond is revoked, it is revoked by the court and a warrant is issued.
    It is typically a failure to appear warrant, though bond can be revoked for violating your bond conditions.
    in regards to the civil contract, it states that they can NOT revoke a bond simply due to non-payment, that it is a civil contract, subject to civil remedies.
    The bail bondsman contracts with the bounty hunter for a bond recovery.
    The bounty hunter is NOT associated with the court, they are NOT court agents, they are private contractors that contract with the bail bondsman, sometimes, they are employees of that bail bondsman.
     

    DarnYankeeUSMC

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    "That person they are seeking to arrest HAS A FUCKING WARRANT" was your exclamation. Your statement reads like it is okay for them to act as law enforcement enforcing a warrant. Which is false. They are enforcing the contract. They don't have authority to arrest they probably cover their ass in the contract to detain and turn over to law enforcement but they don't have authority to arrest anyone. Further more they don't have authority to kick down doors or search random houses. Yes, this was a relative of the jumper. In your own link, you can read, it states they may enter the home of the person contracted with. If they had suspicion he was in his brothers house they should have let law enforcement deal with that.
    You suffer from an intentional refusal to understand.
    A bond revocation results in a warrant, if someones bond is revoked, it is revoked by the court and a warrant is issued.
    It is typically a failure to appear warrant, though bond can be revoked for violating your bond conditions.
    in regards to the civil contract, it states that they can NOT revoke a bond simply due to non-payment, that it is a civil contract, subject to civil remedies.
    The bail bondsman contracts with the bounty hunter for a bond recovery.
    The bounty hunter is NOT associated with the court, they are NOT court agents, they are private contractors that contract with the bail bondsman, sometimes, they are employees of that bail bondsman.
     

    fdkay

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    "That person they are seeking to arrest HAS A FUCKING WARRANT" was your exclamation. Your statement reads like it is okay for them to act as law enforcement enforcing a warrant. Which is false. They are enforcing the contract. They don't have authority to arrest they probably cover their ass in the contract to detain and turn over to law enforcement but they don't have authority to arrest anyone. Further more they don't have authority to kick down doors or search random houses. Yes, this was a relative of the jumper. In your own link, you can read, it states they may enter the home of the person contracted with. If they had suspicion he was in his brothers house they should have let law enforcement deal with that.
    Again, you refuse to understand.
    The person they were seeking to arrest, had a fucking warrant.
    There was a bond revocation, which happens AFTER a hearing, a Judge revoked his bond and a warrant for his arrest was issued (in this case, apparently, bail jumping or FTA)
    I made NO comment on whether it was right or wrong.
    I said that the subject they were looking for, had a warrant.
    Guess what, even the retarded reporter said the fucker had a warrant.
    What they didn't have, was a warrant to enter the brother's home.
    That is a moot point, because they aren't officers of the court, the requirement for a warrant to enter someone's home applies to the fucking government, not to a private citizen.
    I am not saying what they did was legal some states have more restrictions on Bounty HUnters than other states. To make it even worse, this was a neighboring state.
    For some reason, you like to take a statement that I made concerning the fact that the guy they were looking for had a warrant and make sweeping generalizations and falsifications in regards to what I said.
    I also explained that, as private citizens, they are not bound by the Constitution, but by the Penal Code and Code of Criminal Procedure (or whatever they call it in that particular state).
     

    DarnYankeeUSMC

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    Blah blah blah. You are not going to admit that you implied that they have the authority to arrest and enforce the court warrant. That was my original question that you have danced around.
    I hope you are not in law enforcement
     

    BullGear

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    Neither of you are listening to the other. Not a good way to try to understand another's point of view. As long as you won't listen, you might as well stop talking.
     
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    eca7891

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    I’ll state it once again.
    It was the guys BROTHERS house they were invading.

    it’s a flat out law suite against the bounty hunters and charges should be filed. At minimum assault with a deadly weapon.

    They had ZERO authority to enter whatever house they feel like.

    Brother’s house once again. Not the bail jumpers.
     

    BullGear

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    I’ll state it once again.
    It was the guys BROTHERS house they were invading.

    it’s a flat out law suite against the bounty hunters and charges should be filed. At minimum assault with a deadly weapon.

    They had ZERO authority to enter whatever house they feel like.

    Brother’s house once again. Not the bail jumpers.

    Would you please stop stating facts. It's very difficult having a internet fight when the facts are presented.
     

    fdkay

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    Blah blah blah. You are not going to admit that you implied that they have the authority to arrest and enforce the court warrant. That was my original question that you have danced around.
    I hope you are not in law enforcement
    Bullshit.
    They DO have authority to arrest on the warrant. I made that plain as fucking day.
    I said they had no authority to arrest withOUT a warrant.
    See my quote from above:"As such, they are generally given a lot of latitude in entering domicles etc... to make an arrest."
    You kept insisting they were officers of the court, they are not.
    You are full of shit.
     

    Unknown

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    I guess times have changed. My agency, and the agencies that helped us execute any warrants ALWAYS confirmed the warrant prior to taking action on it. If we were going looking for Joe Blow, we always had C-com (central communications) confirm the warrant before we would go to the house looking for him. Doing things that was dramatically reduced potential civil liability.
     
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    fdkay

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    I guess times have changed. My agency, and the agencies that helped us execute any warrants ALWAYS confirmed the warrant prior to taking action on it. If we were going looking for Joe Blow, we always had C-com (central communications) confirm the warrant before we would go to the house looking for him. Doing things that was dramatically reduced potential civil liability.
    He had an active warrant, the issue here are several. It was a Pa warrant in NY. The folks attempting to execute the arrest warrant were bounty hunters.
    The local PD was standing by, not directly involved.
     

    myronman3

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    Bullshit.
    They DO have authority to arrest on the warrant. I made that plain as fucking day.
    I said they had no authority to arrest withOUT a warrant.
    See my quote from above:"As such, they are generally given a lot of latitude in entering domicles etc... to make an arrest."
    You kept insisting they were officers of the court, they are not.
    You are full of shit.
    so let’s say, just for fun, that YOUR brother has a warrent out. and bounty hunters come to YOUR house, and pull this shit on YOU.

    you still cool with it?
     

    thestoicmarcusaurelius

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    let's just get straight to the central issue:

    whether the entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter was unlawful or lawful

    i am not aware of any search warrant to enter the third party's home and i am not aware of any exceptions/exigent circumstances that would justify the entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter

    generally an arrest warrant would not allow entry into a third party's home to execute the warrant unless an exception to the warrant requirement was present at the time of the entry. unless the third party was a co-signor or something on whatever contract there was with the bail bonding company, i don't see that contract forming any basis for lawful entry either

    i think most think this was an unlawful entry of the home based on what we know at this time

    is there anyone on the side of this being a lawful entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter that can state exactly what the legal basis is for it being a lawful entry?
     
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    kwityurbeachn

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    There's plenty of trucks that are used with as much in value. There's vehicles designed to be secured. If your shit is that valuable then it seems appropriate to be able to secure it.

    Change your rules to make the subcontractor have the vehicle to secure your tools. Possibly even require a sub to have a deposit for using your tools. There's better ways to go about the situation.
    No offense on my part. I just think it's funny that you are sneaking around at night checking doors.
    I walk outside my hotel room and look. This is where not knowing enough about a trade and commenting on it isnt wise. Here is another reason why the equipment shouldnt be in their truck. Ex, customer damages verizon 288ct. 400 tickets are created. My customer is receiving 60k per hour down charges. Billy bob the lazy idiot bucked the system thinking i should get more secure trucks shows up to this all hands on deck job. Suddenly he realizes the equipment was stolen. Now verizon cancels my contract and customer b who did the damage cancels contract also. A bunch of damn yankees are pissed cause their cell phones are slow as shit and the primer manufacturer cant repair the software glitch without the internet to load patch.
     

    fdkay

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    so let’s say, just for fun, that YOUR brother has a warrent out. and bounty hunters come to YOUR house, and pull this shit on YOU.

    you still cool with it?
    Well, my brother wouldn't, but for arguments sake, if he DID have a warrant, I would invite them in to pick him up.
     

    Douglas-001

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    I didn't watch it but am assuming the bounty hunters busted in his house. To be honest I am torn on it. I have some strict rules for my techs. No equipment left in trucks. Some were paid to use their personal trucks. I would go to their hotels at night checking to see if my equipment was in the vehicle. Zero shits cared. 20k of my stuff is in your truck, either come down now and hand my stuff over or breaking the window. Am sure the bondsman need their bond the same way I needed my equipment to make money. 2x I had my equipment in vehicles unlocked. 1st time a thief ran off with 20k worth of stuff the 2nd time I took it out of dudes personal truck.
    Not really sure how destroying an employees property fits in the topic......but anywho.....I did watch the video and I propose that in the end, as expected....ASGH....and based upon the direction this thread has taken, I leave members with this brutal confrontation....:ROFLMAO:...I could watch this all day...

     
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    fdkay

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    let's just get straight to the central issue:

    whether the entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter was unlawful or lawful

    i am not aware of any search warrant to enter the third party's home and i am not aware of any exceptions/exigent circumstances that would justify the entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter

    generally an arrest warrant would not allow entry into a third party's home to execute the warrant unless an exception to the warrant requirement was present at the time of the entry. unless the third party was a co-signor or something on whatever contract there was with the bail bonding company, i don't see that contract forming any basis for lawful entry either

    i think most think this was an unlawful entry of the home based on what we know at this time

    is there anyone on the side of this being a lawful entry of the third party's home by the bounty hunter that can state exactly what the legal basis is for it being a lawful entry?
    I'll try to explain again.
    To be sure, I am NOT condoning the actions or making claim that the entry was legal. There was certainly an illegal use of force through the display of a firearm. However, here goes:
    The bounty hunters are NOT agents of the government, federal or state.
    The Constitution limits the actions of the Government.
    So, the 4th amendment does not apply.
    Now, different states have different laws and regulations concerning "Bond Enforcement Agents".
    Some are more strict than others, some states it is illegal and private bond companies are likewise illegal.
    They were bond agents from a different state, but they are required to conform to the state law in which they are operating.
    Entering a third parties home is very questionable, however, has the suspect ever used that address as a home address?
    That may or may not change things.
    I could see the bond agents being charged with brandishing a firearm and criminal trespass, again, it depends how the laws are written for the state. Of course, some on here are insisting that I am condoning what happened, I am not. I merely pointed out that the man that they were looking for did, in fact, have a warrant issued for his arrest.
    Then came the crap about having a warrant to enter the home. They are not the police or other government agency, a warrant to enter someone's home is not granted to a citizen.
    This passage is from the linked article, notice it says they may enter the suspects house, not the house of another.
    The common perception is that bounty hunters are above the law—and in fact, they are not subject to many of the constitutional amendments that govern law enforcement. Bounty hunters are not bound by the constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizures under the Fourth Amendment, the privilege against self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment, or the right to counsel under the Sixth Amendment. For the most part, the industry draws its legal standing from Taylor v. Taintor, a 1872 Supreme Court ruling that allows bounty hunters to, among other things, “pursue [a fugitive] into another State; arrest him on the Sabbath; and, if necessary, break and enter his house for that purpose.”

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