Which peice of equipment shouldni replace

mioduz

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I am getting more into precision reloading. I have mostly all lower end equipment. I am asking what one single peice of equipment or tool if replaced will yield me the best results.

Loading 6.5 creedmoor 140gr with h4150
Best group as per my development has been .4"

Using:
Hornady brass (already have lapua with small rifle primer pockets on hand)
Cci bench rest primers seated with a hornady hand primer tool
Measuring h4150 with a hornady auto trickler
Resizing with a hornady full length standard die
Seating with hornady standard die
Press: hornady classic single station
Trimming on a rcbs trimmer with 3 way head

I have a guess most will say match grade dies but I'm hear to learn what would be most beneficial at this point.
 
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straightshooter1

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I am getting more into precision reloading. I have mostly all lower end equipment. I am asking what one single peice of equipment or tool if replaced will yield me the best results.

Loading 6.5 creedmoor 140gr with h4350
Best group as per my development has been .4"

Using:
Hornady brass (already have lapua with small rifle primer pockets on hand)
Cci bench rest primers seated with a hornady hand primer tool
Measuring h4350 with a hornady auto trickler
Resizing with a hornady full length standard die
Seating with hornady standard die
Press: hornady classic single station
Trimming on a rcbs trimmer with 3 way head

I have a guess most will say match grade dies but I'm hear to learn what would be most beneficial at this point.
The one and first piece of equipment I'd suggest is a high end scale . . . like the FX-120i. I find it's make the greatest improvement in consistency than any other one component.
 

Halfnutz

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    .4? Don't fuck with it.

    Maybe an annealer to extend brass life.
    I run LnL (Lock n Load) bushing for quick die change. You could throw alot of money at what you have and not gain a thing but a bit of time.
    Maybe a trimmer like Giraud or similar.
    Not sure if that's much faster than your 3way.
     

    mioduz

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    .4? Don't fuck with it.

    Maybe an annealer to extend brass life.
    I run LnL (Lock n Load) bushing for quick die change. You could throw alot of money at what you have and not gain a thing but a bit of time.
    Maybe a trimmer like Giraud or similar.
    Not sure if that's much faster than your 3way.
    An annealler is on my list as well.

    I feel like there is still alot more accuracy that can be gained just learning where to shave off the fat is all. My goal is an avg group of .3" with an ideal great day group around .2. I understand that is pushing the limits of all equipment, and myself as a shooter....but you need goals
     

    straightshooter1

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    An annealler is on my list as well.

    I feel like there is still alot more accuracy that can be gained just learning where to shave off the fat is all. My goal is an avg group of .3" with an ideal great day group around .2. I understand that is pushing the limits of all equipment, and myself as a shooter....but you need goals
    An annealer would be my second choice as I find annealing after every firing helps me produce very consistent neck tension and shoulder bumps.
     
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    Halfnutz

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    An annealler is on my list as well.

    I feel like there is still alot more accuracy that can be gained just learning where to shave off the fat is all. My goal is an avg group of .3" with an ideal great day group around .2. I understand that is pushing the limits of all equipment, and myself as a shooter....but you need goals
    You're gonna be mediocre at best in benchrest comp. By that I mean, I guess it depends on your discipline, and if you are trying to get paid for it as a primary source of income. In that case...You're probably going to need to speed up your loading in order not to cut into your practice time. Buy more loading components and run with what you have until the sponsership checks start showing up.

    Day drinking, you get my pure opinion at this point. Many here started with Lee branded equipment and are still running it.
     

    SporterII

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    I agree with a scale. It’s the one item you have no control over. You are making good ammo. A scale may help you detect issues down range.
     
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    Evintos

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    +1 for annealer for most beneficial. Add neck turning (eventually) for more uniform neck tension to help you get closer to your goals.
     

    Joeg26er

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    What’s your shooting platform and bench rest?
    If those aren’t rock solid you’re chasing your tail
     

    db2000

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    I have a Hornady small scale. Came with the LnL press kit. It measures very close to my Fx120i. Clearly, the Fx120i is more accurate and consistent but the slightly smaller SD I now can achieve with the better scale didn’t really translate into better groups yet. I was already getting 6-7 SD and now 3
     

    wpgk58

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    My reloading process and equipment as follows:
    1. Deprime - Mighty Armory with small pin
    2. Clean - Frankford Arsenal Rotary Tumbler with Southern Shine chips and SS pins. Solution Brass Juice
    3. Dry and inspect - dehydrator (Amazon cheap)
    4. Annealing - AMP or Annealeez
    6. Lube - homemade liquid lanolin and 99% isopropyl alcohol 1: 10-12 ratio
    6. Sizing - preferred dies Redding Type S with neck bushing (bushing .001-002” smaller than finished mandrel size) (Whidden, Forester, Redding, LE Wilson all quality dies)
    Redding T7 or Forester Coax or Area 419 Zero Press
    7. Mandrel neck sizing - 21st Century mandrel sizing dies and mandrels.
    8. Clean - quick wet cleaning with no media.
    9. Dry - see above
    10. Trim/Debur/Chamfer - Henderson or Giraud trimmer
    11. Inspection - all cases for consistency
    12. Prime - match grade primers and use Forester Bench Primer.
    13. Powder charging - V4 Autotrickler on FX120I scale (accuracy to .02 grain)
    14. Bullet Seating - Redding Micrometer/Whidden or Forester Micrometer seating dies with honed seating stems
    15. Inspection and boxing
    16. Box labeling with specifics and measurements.
    17. Pew Pew and start all over again.

    This is my process and yield me excellent results. SD 2-7 fps. ES under 15. Runout under .001”
     

    Franko

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    In order of importance (if you don't already have them):
    1. Good calipers
    2. Hornady OAL and Headspace comparator
    3. Chronograph - magnetospeed or labradar (I'm partial to labradar as it does not sit on the gun)
    Then get to shooting. Once your skills are developed enough that your loads are holding you back you can move further down the rabbit hole and buy things like better dies, madrels, annealing machines, and fancy scales.
     

    Maurygold

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    An annealler is on my list as well.

    I feel like there is still alot more accuracy that can be gained just learning where to shave off the fat is all. My goal is an avg group of .3" with an ideal great day group around .2. I understand that is pushing the limits of all equipment, and myself as a shooter....but you need goals
    to move from a single .4 group to an agg of .3 is a significant leap. The ammo has to be perfect but more imortant is the actual components. I shot competitive f class for a while and can tell you testing, testing and more testing is how you get small groups. Testing barrels, reamers, powders, primers, tuners and bullets for the right combo is how you shoot phenomenal groups. This includes testing gear and realizing some things like the AMP or fx120 may help you but you're buying very expensive gear to squeeze that last 1% of performance out. My recommendation would be to buy a Labrador and learn to track data so that as you begin to try new gear and components you can have some form of data other than just what the target shows to look at performance.