Whidden Gunworks Resizing Die

Fire4EffectCA

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I have been using Redding’s Type S resizing die and have noticed it does not resize all of the neck during the resizing operation. I have heard that Whidden’s resizing die does resize the entire neck and I decided to give their resizing die a try.

Brass:

Once fired IVI 85 5.56mm cases.

Necks turned to 0.011”. Note: approximately 75% turned to 0.011”. Remaining portion of neck was slightly under 0.011”.

Resized with Redding Type S full length resizing die and .243 bushing.

I loaded the brass and fired it through my Colt CAR-A3. I full length resized a group of the now twice fired cases with the Redding Type S bushing die (.243) and another group with the Whidden bushing die (.243). I compared the brass visually, but it was not clear if there was a difference. Then I decided to run the cases back through the PMA neck turning tool set for 0.011” and the difference was obvious. A significant amount of material was removed from the base of the necks of the Redding die resized cases whereas the Whidden resized cases were untouched at the neck base. The Whidden resizing die completely resized the neck while the Redding die only resized about 75%.

BTW, this is my first venture in to neck turning. My intent was to explore cleaning up the brass for more consistent neck tension.


Resize 6334.jpg
 

spife7980

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Screw the redding bushing stop down further if you want to size more of the neck?
It wont get all of it due to the chamfer thats present so the case neck doesnt run into a square hard stop inside the die but itll do more than 75%.
1632167548646.png



That said, you discovered why its not advisable to use a bushing die when turning necks on fired brass. When you turn into that unsized portion you are removing more there than you otherwise would on the ret of the case leaving a thinner spot at the base where the neck will be more prone to split off at. Most turn virgin brass.
 

Fire4EffectCA

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Screw the redding bushing stop down further if you want to size more of the neck?
It wont get all of it due to the chamfer thats present so the case neck doesnt run into a square hard stop inside the die but itll do more than 75%.
View attachment 7706983


That said, you discovered why its not advisable to use a bushing die when turning necks on fired brass. When you turn into that unsized portion you are removing more there than you otherwise would on the ret of the case leaving a thinner spot at the base where the neck will be more prone to split off at. Most turn virgin brass.


I adjust my Redding Type S die per Redding's instructions. If I screw it down anymore I will remove the free float feature and gain very little additional neck resizing. I was able to resize all of the neck with the Whidden die without out defeating the free float feature.
 

AllenOne1

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So todays lesson is quit turning necks, sell the Redding die at the next swap meet to someone you don't like and size your brass with the Whidden die. All issues solved, you can thank me later.
 
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Fire4EffectCA

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So todays lesson is quit turning necks, sell the Redding die at the next swap meet to someone you don't like and size your brass with the Whidden die. All issues solved, you can thank me later.

Ha Ha . . . The loads created with the Redding die and no neck turning shot great at 100 yards. I am a retired test engineer and exploring this was interesting and educational. It remains to be seen if there is any real benefit to the extra work.
 
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Fire4EffectCA

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and it looks like you need to turn a bit farther down. Should go into the shoulder a smidge, helps keep the doughnut from forming at base of neck.

I tried and there was no improvement. I even tried the Whidden bushing in the Redding resizing die and saw no improvement. I called Whidden and asked and they said their resizing die is designed to resize the whole neck. I should try the Redding bushing in the Whidden resizing die.
 

John Glidewell

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I tried and there was no improvement. I even tried the Whidden bushing in the Redding resizing die and saw no improvement. I called Whidden and asked and they said their resizing die is designed to resize the whole neck. I should try the Redding bushing in the Whidden resizing die.
not what I am talking about. When you turn necks you have to cut into the shoulder a bit, you stopped at the neck shoulder junction.
 

Fire4EffectCA

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not what I am talking about. When you turn necks you have to cut into the shoulder a bit, you stopped at the neck shoulder junction.

You can see where the 23˚ angle on the cutter is just getting ready to cut in to the shoulder. I did push a little bit further on some Winchester cases and I was surprised how wide the shoulder cut was on one side when it was just starting to cut the other side of the shoulder (180˚). This mirrored the uneven thickness in the case neck too.

I will play with this on the next go around.
 

Steel head

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    and it looks like you need to turn a bit farther down. Should go into the shoulder a smidge, helps keep the doughnut from forming at base of neck.
    Yep
    The 21st century cutters also have the shoulder profiled into them so you kiss the shoulder a bit and donuts are a thing of history.
     
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    Mike Casselton

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    OP.
    When you neck turn, one of the critical steps is the ensure the INSIDE of the case neck is perfectly round.
    If you run your cases through a bushing die, that's fine. However you need to run the necks over a lubed mandrel that mates well with your neck turning tool.

    If you don't run them over the proper mandrel after neck sizing, they will be pretty fucked up as far as concentricity is concerned.

    When done properly, they should look like this:

    20200204_152037.jpg
     

    Fire4EffectCA

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    OP.
    When you neck turn, one of the critical steps is the ensure the INSIDE of the case neck is perfectly round.
    If you run your cases through a bushing die, that's fine. However you need to run the necks over a lubed mandrel that mates well with your neck turning tool.

    If you don't run them over the proper mandrel after neck sizing, they will be pretty fucked up as far as concentricity is concerned.

    When done properly, they should look like this:

    I follow Pat's recommendations from PMA and use his mandrel. I have spoken with him several times. For me to have 100% of the necks turned I would have to reduce the neck thickness below 0.011" which I am not willing to do.