700 Rem Action Rebarrel?

Big Red Ram

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Mar 11, 2022
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Hello,

I am new to the forum but have enjoyed recreational shooting and hunting for years.
My son and I are planning a Colarado hunt in the next year or two for mulies. I have a 1960 era Remington model 700 chambered in 270 that was my first rifle.
I will never sell it but as we look at this adventure know that the old 270 isnt what it once was from an accurate and reliabality point.

Since a new Bergara, Tikka or similar is in the $900 range am I better off to use the action I have with a bedded stock and barrel or new gun?
The gun has sentimental value so I will never sell it but if the action isnt up to par with what is available in a new gun then the point of rebarreling us mute.
 

LuvDog

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Is the barrel shot out? When it comes to sentimental value, I’d have a hard time even re-barreling unless it was toast.

And I’m always in favor of buying more guns
 

n2ishun

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    I'd have a good gunsmith square and true the action, install a new barrel, AND install a good trigger (like a jewell).
    You can get a good stock from stockys (bell and carlson, hs precision, etc) in the correct hunting style and bed it correctly.
    I'd consider upping it to a 30-06 or 35 whelen for a bit more punch and it's nothing more than screwing on the correct barrel to do so.
    If it's 1960's era it's needing all of the above anyway.
    Sure you can buy a new rifle for about 800-900 but if you put that much into this rifle it will be a helluva shooter and still have it's sentimental value.
    AND you can pass something really nice down to your son instead of a well worn thing that doesn't shoot all that well.

    BTW, swap out that anemic bottom metal for something billet at the least, those old remington ones were pot metal.

    I've done exactly this on my own rifle.....so I know of which I speak.
    700.jpg
     

    SmartDonkey

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    It depends on how you look at it-- if you change and modify it a bunch will it still have the same sentimental factor to you? If my first rifle needed work I would try to keep it as "original" as possible and replace the barrel with the same thing it has. Once it has a big stainless barrel and all the other common accessories popular today it would just become another gun to me and not a favorite memory.
     

    Buzzinga

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    I'd put a new barrel on it in a caliber that seems more interesting to you and your son. It sounds like you are at a point where you see this tool as being less than ideal for your purposes. If that is true and it has sentimental value, then putting a new barrel on it would bring it back to a place where it would perform at a high level.

    If you bought a new rifle, you would still be left with a "less than ideal" rifle. I'd rather have one nice rifle that two average rifles, but that is just me.
     

    Dot3

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    By the time you buy the barrel and pay the smith to cut it and chamber it, and especially if you have him work on the action, you’re almost at the price of a new rifle anyways. I agree with it losing sentimentality if it is changed very much
     

    Maxduty

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    At face value of your post, you're not happy with the accuracy and the gun holds sentimental value. I can't tell if you don't want to spend the money on a new one, but re-barreling will run a little less than a new Bergara or Tikka. I'd also try to keep the gun as factory as possible since changing the asthetics will negate the sentimental value it holds. If the only thing left is the original action, is it really the same gun? The old Remingtons are great platforms to start from but many of the factory offerings these days are simply more accurate out of the box.
     

    LuvDog

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    400 bucks, remage, do it yourself in the garage.

    This assumes he has the tools needed. If OP needs a barrel vise, action wrench, go, no/go gauges etc then we’re talking more than the price of a new Tikka.
     

    spamassassin

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    This assumes he has the tools needed. If OP needs a barrel vise, action wrench, go, no/go gauges etc then we’re talking more than the price of a new Tikka.
    Hardly. A bench vise and an action wrench is sufficient. Use a piece of new brass as a go gauge. A used bench vise can be had off craigslist for less than the cost of a nice lunch. An action wrench is 80 bucks. Hyperbole =/= facts.
     
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    LuvDog

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    What I said isn’t hyperbole. If he needs to source the proper tools then the total cost of all the tools and the barrel and parts would be the $670 that a brand new Tikka costs

    But even with making due, it’s more than $400

    NSS Remage is min 325
    NSS Recoil Lug $27
    NSS Barrel Nut $28
    NSS Barrel Nut Wrench $18
    Total for parts alone without shipping is $398

    Plus at minimum he needs an action wrench.
    Anywhere from $65-$125

    And he needs a way to clamp the barrel when he installs the new barrel without damaging it. So either a barrel vise or some way to keep it steady in a bench vise. Even the cheap rubber jaws cost money.
    A decent viper barrel vise is $75 and costs can go to $175 for a SAC

    Assuming he has a torque wrench

    Can he get away without go no-go gauges? Sure but with a remage, I wouldn’t want to skip that step.
    2 gauges is about $75
     
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    Mike Casselton

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    Nothing wrong with .270 cal. Unless the accuracy has seriously degraded I'd be taking it out like it is.

    ^^^^^^
    This right here.

    The 270 has been killing deer and antelope for nearly a century.
    I'm at a loss to understand why you think it's incapable of killing a mule deer.

    Accuracy is fine with the 270.
    Does the rifle have some sort of defect that is causing a reliability issue?

    I wouldn't feel handicapped at all with a 270 unless my goal was to plan on a long range kill only.
    Even then, it's easily capable of a 500 yd kill on a deer.
     

    spamassassin

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    What I said isn’t hyperbole. If he needs to source the proper tools then the total cost of all the tools and the barrel and parts would be the $670 that a brand new Tikka costs

    But even with making due, it’s more than $400

    NSS Remage is min 325
    NSS Recoil Lug $27
    NSS Barrel Nut $28
    NSS Barrel Nut Wrench $18
    Total for parts alone without shipping is $398

    Plus at minimum he needs an action wrench.
    Anywhere from $65-$125

    And he needs a way to clamp the barrel when he installs the new barrel without damaging it. So either a barrel vise or some way to keep it steady in a bench vise. Even the cheap rubber jaws cost money.
    A decent viper barrel vise is $75 and costs can go to $175 for a SAC

    Assuming he has a torque wrench

    Can he get away without go no-go gauges? Sure but with a remage, I wouldn’t want to skip that step.
    2 gauges is about $75
    Apparently you don't have much or possibly any experience doing this sort of thing. I've personally done more than a dozen which were all used in competition shooting. A go-guage is longer than a new unfired casing from shoulder to base so you don't need it, an unfired case will do just fine. It's ok to set up your headspace to be smaller than a go gauge and if you properly use a go-gauge, you don't need a no-go gauge. A barrel vise is completely unnecessary. A bench vise will do that job quite well and all you need to keep the barrel steady is either enough clamping load or a small section of split 2x4 with a hole drilled in it and enough clamping load if you're worried about finish. I use aluminum AN vise jaws from SummitRacing.com which cost 20 bucks and preserve the finish quite nicely as well as serving when I need to fabricate braided lines for my hotrod. We'll assume that like any other grown ass man he has a bench vise in the garage and a piece of 2x4 laying around and if not they're almost free on craigslist most anywhere in the country. So the cost is 325 for the barrel and 65-80 bucks for an action wrench. Yeah... 400 bucks plus or minus the cost of lunch and do it in the garage.
     

    The D

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    How many rounds do you think have been shot through the barrel? If it’s quite a lot, have someone inspect the barrel to determine if it needs to be replaced. You could also buy your own cheap borescope and post some pictures here, there are plenty of people here that can determine your barrel’s condition.

    Now, if the barrel is fine you could clean it really well and start reloading to make your own ammo that’s better than almost any other factory offerings

    If the barrel is determined to be shot out there are several ways to re-barrel:

    Just give the gun to a smith and let them deal with it. This could also include having it blueprinted and having measurements kept on file so you only need to call and have a barrel cut

    Building a remage setup with a barrel nut. This involves at least borrowing/renting the tools to do it. If you’re not comfortable with the idea of working on your own firearms then this may not be for you

    Building a quick-change system(West Texas Ordnance switch lug & ARC barloc initially come to mind). This involves a little more up-front work, possibly by a gunsmith, but will make barrel changes easier in the future

    If you decide to re-barrel now comes the fun part, choosing cartridges. If the .270 itself holds some sentimental value then definitely stick with that. But now that you’ve gone through all the work to have the barrel changed the only other thing you need to do is pick a cartridge that has the same bolt face as .270(which means you have dozens to choose from). 270 is pretty versatile but maybe you want to hunt some bigger game. 280ai & .30-06 would be two I’d consider. White tail hunting or long range target shooting? Something 6.5mm. Varminting or a beginner cartridge for kids? 6mm or .22 caliber.

    I know this is a lot of info, but you asked. Start reading and narrowing down what you really want from this. We’ll be here to answer any more questions

    And just an aside, eventually I’ll be inheriting a rem 700 in 7mm rem magnum that was my grandfather’s. I’ll be working that over into my own vision of a switch-barrel rifle. It will get passed down to my kids/ grandkids eventually but it won’t ever be sold, unless it’s after I’m gone
     

    Dot3

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    I’ve never done a remage setup so this is a serious question: doesn’t the barrel channel have to be opened up to allow for the nut? At that point, even if cost is considerably lower than a new rifle, the sentimental value (if it were mine) would decrease dramatically. But it’s not for me to say what is or isn’t sentimental to someone else.
     

    The D

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    Maybe, probably depending on the nut you use. But it would only be closer to the action unless you decide to use a no-taper barrel. All of this modification shouldn’t be noticeable unless someone really starts looking, except the barrel nut obviously
     
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    Baron23

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    I know a bit more about vintage shotguns than rifles. In shotguns...in America only....people are nuts about keeping the guy "original" and never want to refinish them. They would rather have that old Model 12 look like a beat up fence post than refinish and refurbish it.

    The British think we are out of our fucking minds, remind us that refinishing is exactly why they leave the wood proud, and think nothing of having an old barrel resleeved to use modern ammo. Including Purdy, Boss, H&H...those type of very high end guns too.
    I'm more with the Brits on this. Particularly since you are not looking to preserve resale value.

    IF, the barrel really needs to be changed out (worn out or caliber is absolutely not suitable for the game you wan to hunt), then rebarrel it. Receiver truing optional (depending on $$ you wish to spend) but I would replace the trigger also but I'm a bit nuts about trigger feel.

    And I presume that this early 60's Remington was made with better skill and tooling than the last 700's they put out. I'm sort of one of those old curmudgeons that generally thinks nothing is made better than it was in years past. Right? ;-) haha

    I'm also assuming that it has a wood stock, right? If so, and there are no pillars in there, I would seriously consider having them added and the action bedded. I have a more much more recent 700 5R that came in an HS Precision stock and its pretty good, by my estimation. It comes with an aluminum bedding block (which my local gunsmith trued up a bit and then we bedded the action).

    Just depends on how attached you are to its original appearance.

    Anyway, those were my initial, "I'm no expert", random musings.
     

    LuvDog

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    Apparently you don't have much or possibly any experience doing this sort of thing. I've personally done more than a dozen which were all used in competition shooting. A go-guage is longer than a new unfired casing from shoulder to base so you don't need it, an unfired case will do just fine. It's ok to set up your headspace to be smaller than a go gauge and if you properly use a go-gauge, you don't need a no-go gauge. A barrel vise is completely unnecessary. A bench vise will do that job quite well and all you need to keep the barrel steady is either enough clamping load or a small section of split 2x4 with a hole drilled in it and enough clamping load if you're worried about finish. I use aluminum AN vise jaws from SummitRacing.com which cost 20 bucks and preserve the finish quite nicely as well as serving when I need to fabricate braided lines for my hotrod. We'll assume that like any other grown ass man he has a bench vise in the garage and a piece of 2x4 laying around and if not they're almost free on craigslist most anywhere in the country. So the cost is 325 for the barrel and 65-80 bucks for an action wrench. Yeah... 400 bucks plus or minus the cost of lunch and do it in the garage.

    Well, I’ve re-barreled enough and built enough of my own rifles over the years that I’ll still use gauges to headspace… and I’ll use gauges to check on rifles that have had a lot of use to make sure they are still in spec.

    Can it be done without them? Sure it can, but lots of things can be done without the proper tools… but bad things can happen too.
    Do you need a torque wrench? No, but how many people have messed up something simple that could have been avoided with it?

    I listed the prices. So the OP can make their own decision.

    you can continue to do whatever works for you
     

    Jackomason

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    If I were in your shoes I'd have the same contour, color match/blue it and get a really nice blank to start with. You'll breath new life into it and give yourself a ton of confidence. The 270 will kill elk but I agree, out here in Colorado, it can be a game changer where they fall. So anchoring them is a big bonus.

    So maybe grab a cheap tikka T3x in your favorite magnum. Then next year rebarrel old faithful. The T3x could really open your eyes to what your missing or what you already have!
     
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    supercorndogs

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    I’ve never done a remage setup so this is a serious question: doesn’t the barrel channel have to be opened up to allow for the nut? At that point, even if cost is considerably lower than a new rifle, the sentimental value (if it were mine) would decrease dramatically. But it’s not for me to say what is or isn’t sentimental to someone else.
    Every stock I have has fit the barrel nut with no modification. The barrel nuts I have are not much if any bigger than the first taper on a shouldered barrel. This goes for barrel channels made for Remington Sendero/Varmint profile barrels.
     

    Wiillk

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    Not a lot of love here for the Ruger American or the Weatherby Vanguard, but both are capable rifles, providing better than necessary hunting accuracy, and they cost not much more than a rebarrel.

    If the 700 has sentimental value, rebuilding it will make it something less than sentimental. But a rebarrel with the same contour, blueing and barrel length, can add life to what was ”once” one of the better push feed actions. (Before corporate greed overran quality build at Remington.)

    Early 700’s were well made and well finished and shot as accurately as any hunting rifle of the era. We still love the last of our early 700’s
     
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    USP45

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    Would it be possible to have a good smith look at it and see if there is a possibility of setting the barrel back and re-cutting the chamber to 270 again? There is nothing wrong with 270 as many have already said, and if it is just the throat that is firecracked and shot out a good setback and rechamber could bring it to where it shot before. Unless very heavily used the bore on a rifle is normally still in good shape, but a competent smith could make an accurate assessment as to whether this would be possible by plugging the barrel and borescoping. If you went that route the original patina and look would be maintained, have the smith bed the action and put in a nice trigger while at it and you could get many more years of service out of it. Just a thought

    Oh, and depending on the range in which you are planning on shooting a 270 shooting factory Hornady 145gr ELDX is very close to a 6.5 PRC shooting factory Hornady 143gr ELDX out to about 500 yards. Like surprisingly close
     
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    Jackomason

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    You mention reliability? What's going on there?

    Gunworks has a good video about taking care of your 700 action. If it just needs to be cleaned and flushed that could we well worth watching.
     

    Big Red Ram

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    Wow lots of good information here with a ton of varying opinions.
    The "sentimental value" part came up often in the replies. While it does have sentimental value its not doing me much good if I have lost confidence in its functionality and accuracy. The safety hangs up, I have never liked the top loading/unloading, the stock is not bedded and I am not impressed with the accuracy. I do like the idea of bringing it to a smith for another opinion. If I were to re barrel I would also spring for a stock that would accept a removable magazine and has a recoil pad.

    While I do enjoy building my own rifle and have in fact built an AR in 6.5 Grendel I would feel better with an expert setting up the barrel.
    from there I could do the bedding and trigger. If I could accomplish this for a grand or so and come out with a rifle that is as good or better than factory rifle then I am in. As I mentioned its not doing me much good the way it is so if a rebuild gives me a solid shooter that is truely a custom built gun then that would be pretty special.
     

    Maxduty

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    Wow lots of good information here with a ton of varying opinions.
    The "sentimental value" part came up often in the replies. While it does have sentimental value its not doing me much good if I have lost confidence in its functionality and accuracy. The safety hangs up, I have never liked the top loading/unloading, the stock is not bedded and I am not impressed with the accuracy. I do like the idea of bringing it to a smith for another opinion. If I were to re barrel I would also spring for a stock that would accept a removable magazine and has a recoil pad.

    While I do enjoy building my own rifle and have in fact built an AR in 6.5 Grendel I would feel better with an expert setting up the barrel.
    from there I could do the bedding and trigger. If I could accomplish this for a grand or so and come out with a rifle that is as good or better than factory rifle then I am in. As I mentioned its not doing me much good the way it is so if a rebuild gives me a solid shooter that is truely a custom built gun then that would be pretty special.
    Then fawk it, skys the limit. Build it.
     
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    Wannashootit

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    If I could accomplish this for a grand or so and come out with a rifle that is as good or better than factory rifle then I am in.
    Gonna be tight.
    Rebarreling will run $500-$600 min, new trigger, stock, bottom metal/DBM, Cerakote (unless you DIY the new barrel coating)....
    It all adds up quick. Yes, you'll be above the cost of a some of the new factory rifles you mentioned.

    Break it all down, with costs for the smith's labor plus the cost for the components you plan to purchase then you're in a better position to make an informed decision.
     

    long range sponge

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    If you don't reload, stay with a 270 or go 30-06. If you do reload, go 280AI. Drop it all in a KRG Bravo and go fill the freezer. I lust for justification to build a 7SAUM/284Win/280AI so I MAY be living vicariously through you just a touch. 😁
     
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    cow0man

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    Lots of people around with proper tools to rebarrel that would be willing to help. If in SE Texas, give me a holler and will help with the remage barrel.
     
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    The D

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    If you don't reload, stay with a 270 or go 30-06. If you do reload, go 280AI. Drop it all in a KRG Bravo and go fill the freezer. I lust for justification to build a 7SAUM/284Win/280AI so I MAY be living vicariously through you just a touch. 😁
    Almost all of the “I need help with X” threads I post in are a way for me to do that too. Someday…
     
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    domdoc

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    I got a Criterion Remage barrel, action wrench, recoil lug, and nut from Northland Shooters Supply, and a set of go/no-go gauges. Cheap torque wrench. My rifle (a Remington 700 with a lot of history for me) then shot under 0.20" for 5 shots with handloads. You are unlikely to have to open the barrel channel for the nut, since the barrel diameter at the front of the action will be less than factory, and the nut brings the total diameter up to right about the same as factory. Call Northland and talk to them. Get their stuff, since it will automatically center the recoil lug, whereas other action wrenches may not.
     
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    chthomp

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    Hello,

    I am new to the forum but have enjoyed recreational shooting and hunting for years.
    My son and I are planning a Colarado hunt in the next year or two for mulies. I have a 1960 era Remington model 700 chambered in 270 that was my first rifle.
    I will never sell it but as we look at this adventure know that the old 270 isnt what it once was from an accurate and reliabality point.

    Since a new Bergara, Tikka or similar is in the $900 range am I better off to use the action I have with a bedded stock and barrel or new gun?
    The gun has sentimental value so I will never sell it but if the action isnt up to par with what is available in a new gun then the point of rebarreling us mute.
    Well, it sounds like you have a nice older 700 and that .270 is an excellent round and will kill all game in North America, so if it shoots
    and you are comfortable with it ........... use it !! Is the barrel is shot out, that I doubt, any current accuracy issues ??

    So you can re-barrel it and do other upgrades but why, if it's sentimental put it back in the safe and purchase something new, it sounds to
    me like someone has told you you need a " larger caliber " ......... that's BS.
     
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    rottenruger

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    Hello,

    I am new to the forum but have enjoyed recreational shooting and hunting for years.
    My son and I are planning a Colarado hunt in the next year or two for mulies. I have a 1960 era Remington model 700 chambered in 270 that was my first rifle.
    I will never sell it but as we look at this adventure know that the old 270 isnt what it once was from an accurate and reliabality point.

    Since a new Bergara, Tikka or similar is in the $900 range am I better off to use the action I have with a bedded stock and barrel or new gun?
    The gun has sentimental value so I will never sell it but if the action isnt up to par with what is available in a new gun then the point of rebarreling us mute.
    270 Win is a time proven caliber. I agree with Steel Head who suggested re-barreling it.

    Leave those poor little mulies alone, my wife said.

    I say, blast away.
     

    Big Red Ram

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    Thanks again for all the replies and assistance, this is exactly what I am looking for as someone who has been shooting forever but never ventured down this road.

    So after doing much research and asking many questions I do have some direction:

    1. Bring my 700 to a smith for review, scope it and if all looks good put a stock and trigger on. If the accuracy is acceptable job done, if not one smith suggested clipping off the end of the barrel and or adding a threaded muzzle at the same time. Finally if that isnt an option rebarrel, some on the forum have mentioned "remage", I did some research but would like an explanation from the experts here.

    2. I found a Christensen Mesa for $1299 that I like, the stock seems to fit me, its not too heavy and to the best of my knowledge has a decent reputation. At $1299 however I am close to the point of funding an all custom rifle with my 700 action.

    3. Finally it sounds like my old 700 has some value on the open market, selling it would fund most of my off the shelf rifle.
    Can you tell I have a difficult time making a decision ha ha!

    Lastly does anyone have a hunter stock that would fit my 700 like the Christensen Mesa. It looks like I can buy that stock for about $350.

    We live in NE Wisconsin, if there is anyone out there who would consider working with me on this.
     
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    Wannashootit

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    some on the forum have mentioned "remage", I did some research but would like an explanation from the experts here.
    Think Savage, identical system using a barrel nut to set headspace.
    "Prefit" Remage barrels are fully threaded/chambered. With a "go" gage in the chamber, screw the barrel into the receiver until it contacts the boltface- tighten the nut and headspace is set.
     

    spife7980

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    Basically the barrel nut acts as a jam nut so that the barrel can’t move from where you locate it.
     

    Highbrass

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    highbrasssports.com
    The beauty part about the Remage barrel. Should you decide to change calibers ( with the same case head size ) a barrel change using another Remage literally takes 10 minutes.
    This is my .270 Remington Sportsman 78 (Same as Rem 700) which I rebarreled (Remage) in a .270 With a faster twist, and a chassis stock.
    The Remage is a copy of the system Savage has been using for a long time. Look in the background just under the rifle and you will see a stack of barrels. 13 different calibers available that can be swapped in less time than it took to make this post!

    oryx.jpg
     
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    Jackomason

    Poop-smith aka "Turd Herder"
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Dec 26, 2013
    1,296
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    Westcliffe Colorado
    The beauty part about the Remage barrel. Should you decide to change calibers ( with the same case head size ) a barrel change using another Remage literally takes 10 minutes.
    This is my .270 Remington Sportsman 78 (Same as Rem 700) which I rebarreled (Remage) in a .270 With a faster twist, and a chassis stock.
    The Remage is a copy of the system Savage has been using for a long time. Look in the background just under the rifle and you will see a stack of barrels. 13 different calibers available that can be swapped in less time than it took to make this post!

    View attachment 7831426
    Buuut, if you get two shouldered barrels made you can swap between them in 3 minutes!

    I'm kidding it's probably about the same amount of time considering you can red loctite the barrel nut in place.

    #BarrelNutsAreUgly
     

    Highbrass

    Pew Tang Clan
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    May 29, 2020
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    Fort Worth Tx
    highbrasssports.com
    Barrel nuts are ugly ...BUT ...I trust them!
    No Loctite necessary ..Thanks!
    I grew up in a machine shop and I have personally seen up close the fuck-ups that run the machines. I know people have had great luck running the shouldered prefits. Do I trust them-HELL NAW !
     
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    Clark

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jul 4, 2003
    2,701
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    WA the everblue state
    I have rebarrelled (8) used Rem 700 rifles.
    I have rebarrelled (2) pre 64 M70 rifles.
    Those are my favorite rifles to rebarrel.

    Here is an example:

    $300 gun show 6-23-2012 May 1963 Rem700 ADL with Hart 7mmRM stainless painted black barrel.
    $230 Shilen stainless match #3 taper barrel brownells 9-18-2012
    $232 High Tech Specialties [Bansner] stock brownells
    $435 L4 VX-III 3.5-10x40mm. Matte, standard duplex, CDS, 24HCF 3-16-2013
    $50 Burris low tactical rings brownells
    $40 EGW one piece base swfa
    $35 Holland recoil lug and pin brownells
    $32 Large grind to fit Limbsaver recoil pad brownells
    $36 Vero Vellini sling V19023 amazon
    $30 rear bag dog-gone-good Holland type 2x3x4" direct
    $12 Uncle Mikes 1" swivels amazon
    $14 Allen buttstock cheekrest shell holder pouch amazon
    $9 glow tape JVCC GLW, Amazon Oct 2, 2013
    $10 one part epoxy spray paint ALUMA-HYDE II AEROSOL, O.D. GREEN brownells
    sharpie marks on tape for ranges
    5/8 round Aluminum for pillars
    Pine for butt plug to attach recoil pad
    screws for recoil pad
    Devcon steel putty for butt plug, pillars, and recoil lug
    ammo
    bore cleaning
    rifle case
    7mmRemMag reamer
    Lathe bits
    -------------------
    $1572
     

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    athanasios23

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 28, 2009
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    New York, USA
    What is the condition of your stock? That would be the deciding factor for me. If the stock is in good shape, I'd Rebarrel the rifle. Have your smith true the action, bed the action and make sure the barrel was completely free floated. As for trigger you can swap it or have them tune it. The trigger to me wouldn't really change the sentimental value. You may be different. This way your favorite(first) rifle still looks the same just works much better.