Fieldcraft 72 Hours with a Quart Ziplock or HPG Kit Bag

david walter

Insightful commentator
Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
Supporter+
Jul 22, 2007
2,499
1,881
Out west, but not too far west
This got me thinking….

I’ve been known to wear a Hill People Gear Kit Bag while hiking and hunting, mostly to conceal a Glock 19 and to carry some essentials and snacks.

Using the Fieldcraft Survival minimalist approach, and using a HPG Kit Bag, assuming the back compartment has a handgun of some sort, what would you put in the middle compartment and the zipped front pouch for an overnighter or up to 72 hours until rescue?

Wife and I just bought 4 wheelers, and while packing some basic survive-where-the-ATV-broke gear, I headed down this bunny hole.

We live in SE WA, and while not as remote as when I lived and hunted in Alaska, things happen that force unexpected camp outs or hike outs.

What would you take, and why?
 

OREGUN

Alpine Orangutan
Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
Supporter+
  • Apr 29, 2014
    1,292
    1,813
    Out West
    Warmth, water, signals, navigation. In that order. To whatever quantity you have space and in whatever measure your climate/season requires.
     

    david walter

    Insightful commentator
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Jul 22, 2007
    2,499
    1,881
    Out west, but not too far west
    Mike,

    My ATV is fully equipped for a few nights out, and I have a day pack.

    I’m really asking what you’d carry just in the kit bag, as a last resort, for up to 72 hours.

    Mine has a life straw, and tablets,
    Poncho
    Twine
    Knife and multi tool
    Two ways to start a fire with fire starter
    Space blanket
    3 high calorie bars
    Meds
    Cable saw

    What am I missing?
     
    Last edited:
    • Like
    Reactions: Kalthoff

    jphil108

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jul 21, 2010
    311
    560
    Life straw, 2 in-date power bars, spare knife, a Couple of contractor trash bags (improvised shelter), bic lighter wrapped in duct tape, some zip ties, a couple of gallon zip lock bag rolled up (water collection) 20’ of paracord, a good compass, map section of your AO. With some creative packaging, that can usually all fit tightly in a magazine pouch. I keep a notebook, pencil sharpener, and pencil in mine and package everything in one of the gallon zip lock bags, and I keep one of those cheap gym back packs with the shitty rope cinch straps folded in, all of that fits in a double magazine sized zipper pouch.

    If you enjoy learning through misery, take a weekend to go camping with nothing but your emergency stuff, it will let you know real quickly what doesn’t work well so you can modify it. Learn your areas geography, It’s hard to find places anymore where you won’t find rivers, roads, railroads, or power lines, that stuff usually leads to people.
     

    Epsilon

    Private
    Minuteman
    Apr 18, 2020
    70
    59
    You mention meds but how about bleeding control or better yet a trauma kit? Just adding a couple CAT tourniquets and a roll of gauze could be a game changer in an accident. Even better strap on a separate kit to the ATV somewhere.

    North American rescue or Dark Angel Medical are solid places to look for kits/components.
     

    flyfisher117

    Professional Milk Jug Hunter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Sep 25, 2010
    725
    350
    Idaho
    Their 72 hour challenge has got my interest. I carry a small pouch in my dirt bike pack with the goal of surviving a few days in the Idaho back country if I needed. Beyond knowing the gear and how to use it I've never tried. Maybe next spring summer and fall I'll go out and give it a test.
     

    lariat

    Old Salt
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 11, 2018
    3,296
    6,953
    You mention meds but how about bleeding control or better yet a trauma kit? Just adding a couple CAT tourniquets and a roll of gauze could be a game changer in an accident. Even better strap on a separate kit to the ATV somewhere.

    North American rescue or Dark Angel Medical are solid places to look for kits/components.
    Yes, but you must know how to use what you carry. When to use use a TQ is as important as knowing how. Knowing what is about to happen to you limb and your body once you correct that life ending injury with one is a critical component to any subsequent plan.

    it’s been said a million times on here, but EMT training is a small investment with massive payout. That knowledge can make you and your medical gear effective. 8 hours with a severe injury is a challenge let alone 72 that could turn into much longer with mobility issues.
     

    roostercogburn98

    Crawling America, one mall at a time
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Nov 3, 2010
    6,571
    12,436
    Mike,

    My ATV is fully equipped for a few nights out, and I have a day pack.

    I’m really asking what you’d carry just in the kit bag, as a last resort, for up to 72 hours.

    Mine has a life straw, and tablets,
    Poncho
    Twine
    Knife and multi tool
    Two ways to start a fire with fire starter
    Space blanket
    3 high calorie bars
    Meds
    Cable saw

    What am I missing?
    Some paracord, didn’t notice a map, gps, compass unless your watch has one. Maybe a pen flare or some sort of small aerial signal. And just to clarify, do you have a way to transport water? Life straw is nice, but limits you to proximity of water, a collapsible water carrier or camelback would extend your range if you need to move.
     

    Lunarstorm95

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Apr 9, 2019
    153
    67
    Mike,

    My ATV is fully equipped for a few nights out, and I have a day pack.

    I’m really asking what you’d carry just in the kit bag, as a last resort, for up to 72 hours.

    Mine has a life straw, and tablets,
    Poncho
    Twine
    Knife and multi tool
    Two ways to start a fire with fire starter
    Space blanket
    3 high calorie bars
    Meds
    Cable saw

    What am I missing?
    Something to hold water, a single wall metal canteen with cup of some sorts, it can keep you warm when you sleep, keep you hydrated, make char cloth, make wild tea, beat ur riding companion, all sorts of uses. With ur current set up you would need to sit near water and in a warmer climate bug's will eat you alive, colder climates ur begging to freeze.

    Experience: Wilderness search and rescue.
     

    Lunarstorm95

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Apr 9, 2019
    153
    67
    Their 72 hour challenge has got my interest. I carry a small pouch in my dirt bike pack with the goal of surviving a few days in the Idaho back country if I needed. Beyond knowing the gear and how to use it I've never tried. Maybe next spring summer and fall I'll go out and give it a test.
    Not to keep waving my dick around but as someone who rescues people who get lost or stuck, a single pouch of gadgets will not save you up in Idaho if you haven't done much in the wilderness, please go use ur stuff.
     

    MK20

    Major Member
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Apr 17, 2018
    3,105
    4,966
    The land of many waters
    This got me thinking….

    I’ve been known to wear a Hill People Gear Kit Bag while hiking and hunting, mostly to conceal a Glock 19 and to carry some essentials and snacks.

    Using the Fieldcraft Survival minimalist approach, and using a HPG Kit Bag, assuming the back compartment has a handgun of some sort, what would you put in the middle compartment and the zipped front pouch for an overnighter or up to 72 hours until rescue?

    Wife and I just bought 4 wheelers, and while packing some basic survive-where-the-ATV-broke gear, I headed down this bunny hole.

    We live in SE WA, and while not as remote as when I lived and hunted in Alaska, things happen that force unexpected camp outs or hike outs.

    What would you take, and why?

    IF you can find one, a Jerven Bag is the best. It weighs three pounds, is small, and will keep you alive in the winter. Keeps water and snow out too. Can't beat it.
     

    MK20

    Major Member
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Apr 17, 2018
    3,105
    4,966
    The land of many waters
    Oh, yeah. I live up here. It was 18 degrees last night with 2 feet of snow on the ground. This is good weather. The stuff that will kill you quick is when it is 35 degrees and raining. That is why that jerven is so good.
     

    Lunarstorm95

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Apr 9, 2019
    153
    67
    Oh, yeah. I live up here. It was 18 degrees last night with 2 feet of snow on the ground. This is good weather. The stuff that will kill you quick is when it is 35 degrees and raining. That is why that jerven is so good.
    Exactly it's hard to imagine a full 72hr kit packed into a gp pouch suitable for up their, even in the summer. Alot of people underestimate the ability to go hypothermic in 60 degree weather. I'll take a peek at the bag, I kinda need a new one.
     

    TACC

    Major Hide Member
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Jan 10, 2019
    1,541
    1,408
    To add to the growing list,
    Compass
    HAND HELD GPS, EXTRA BATTETIES
     

    MK20

    Major Member
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
    Apr 17, 2018
    3,105
    4,966
    The land of many waters
    If you want one for everything, get the extreme. It has enough insulation to be a decent sleeping bag. They were designed as a all around survival bag originally.
     

    GrumpyOleFart

    Sardaukar are sissies
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Supporter+
  • Sep 18, 2020
    2,501
    3,528
    Perth, Western Australia
    Bivvy bag.
    Those things are gold.
    Or the $10 survival bag.
    IFAK, naturally, and the trusty Camelbak.
    Amazing how much gear you can carry in the Camelbak
    I go everywhere with it, hunting, kayak, leave it in truck for work.
    Renting or buying an EPIRB is a good idea.
    They have become very affordable here, with government subsidies, and the huge surface area of Western Australia.
    Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst.
    Refresh yourself on First Aid, keep a decent level of fitness.
    If on a quad, safety glasses and helmet.
    We get so many avoidable casualties here, due to quad riders not wearing headgear.
    And the list goes on.
     

    flyfisher117

    Professional Milk Jug Hunter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Sep 25, 2010
    725
    350
    Idaho
    Not to keep waving my dick around but as someone who rescues people who get lost or stuck, a single pouch of gadgets will not save you up in Idaho if you haven't done much in the wilderness, please go use ur stuff.
    I am very much aware. I know how to use all of my "gadgets". I have however never been lost to where all I had was said gadgets. My entire first post was to go out with only those gadgets and spend a few nights with nothing but what i carry .
     

    Alpine 338

    Lumberjack
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jun 26, 2010
    2,506
    1,614
    NW Colorado
    What fits, and what's needed will vary from person to person, and the area or environment they're in.

    Speaking specifically about my AO, we have soo many little micro-climates separated by short distances and/or altitude.

    I can go from 6500-ft to 10500-ft in 20-minutes on a quad, and see huge climate/temperature changes.
    I can travel from one side of a valley that is high desert, dry with sagebrush, to the other side of the valley where I can be in an old growth forest that is moist with chest high ferns growing in the small openings.

    Plan accordingly.
     

    Old Soldier

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Aug 3, 2014
    62
    44
    North Pole Alaska
    You need to stay warm, dry and hydrated. The rest is extra. Quality rain gear, and warm when wet snivel gear. That and a gallon of water, and you'll be alive 72 hours latter.
     

    mcameron

    Two Star General
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Nov 17, 2011
    7,050
    20,460
    72 hr kit thatll fit in a chest rig?

    the thing to remember, a "survival kit" is intended to supplement the equipment you already have, they are not designed to be a standalone kit with everything you need....especially when you are making sacrifices with size....

    so assuming you are properly dressed for the weather....and assuming you have items like a water bottle, knife, medkit, ect. and other accoutrements that you would need for a day trip into a remote area......your main needs are going to be Shelter, Water, Fire, and Food


    Shelter:
    • Large contractor trash bag...2 would be better if you can fit it
    • Space blanket
    • 100' micro paracord
    Water:
    • Iodine tablets
    Fire:
    • Butane lighter
    • Storm matches
    • Some form of tinder...a few yards of duct tape is good tinder, and serves multiple purposes.
    Food:
    • Youll live 3 days without food, but if you have room, a few powerbars would be a good choice
    Misc:
    • map of area
    • decent compass
    • whistle

    if you have room, some nice to haves would be:
    • orange flagging tape
    • glow sticks
    • road flares
     
    Last edited:
    • Like
    Reactions: flyfisher117