Anybody else hate the gym?

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    I used to be an amateur boxer. I started teaching my son how to throw some punches, hitting the heavy bag & mitts. I provided instruction along the way (footwork, defense, setting traps, etc) & told him at some point in life he’ll need to use these skills to defend himself. We even did some light sparring along the way. It’s also good cardio so rock’n’roll w/ the PT.

    I bought more equipment & my daughter got involved as well. She asked for & received a super cobra bag for Christmas. I didn’t see that coming! I really don’t foresee either kid traveling around to do club fights or Golden Gloves, etc but its encouraging to see them learn to take care of themselves.

    The bitch of this situation is that I ended up tearing a tendon & a ligament in my elbow so I haven’t been able to throw punches or PT in the home gym for a few months. We just don’t heal as well as we did 30 years ago.

    The funny thing is that even at 48 years old I can still attack the workout session like it stole money from my grandma. After doing a PRP treatment I’m hoping to get back into the home gym routine (slowly) in a few more weeks.
     
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    theLBC

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    i used to like going to the gym, and i generally try to avoid things i hate.
     

    lariat

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    The bitch of this situation is that I ended up tearing a tendon & a ligament in my elbow so I haven’t been able to throw punches or PT in the home gym for a few months. We just don’t heal as well as we did 30 years ago.

    The funny thing is that even at 48 years old I can still attack the workout session like it stole money from my grandma. After doing a PRP treatment I’m hoping to get back into the home gym routine (slowly) in a few more weeks.
    Man that sucks, good luck with that. I tore the medial head of my tricep off of my elbow while working out some years back. Doc said 18 months for full recovery. I thought he was joking. He’s was pretty right on. It took a long time to heal enough to begin using and then forever to start really lifting again. But I came back. Good on you for not stopping. Fuck that quitting shit.
     
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    Dunraven

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    Don't hate them at all. Been going since mid 20s after tearing an ACL. One thing led to another. Had some great partners along the way. Hardest part is just getting there sometimes. It helps to go at 6am. No crowds. Working hard now to stay fit, trying to keep up with the prs boys! I just feel better physically, and I believe mentally, after a good workout.
     
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    Choid

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    After a good workout I generally feel like I am going to give up my breakfast. A few hours later, I feel pretty good.
     
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    MarinePMI

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    Man that sucks, good luck with that. I tore the medial head of my tricep off of my elbow while working out some years back. Doc said 18 months for full recovery. I thought he was joking. He’s was pretty right on. It took a long time to heal enough to begin using and then forever to start really lifting again. But I came back. Good on you for not stopping. Fuck that quitting shit.
    Spot on about the recovery. At 48 I put a 3cm tear in my left pec (tired, and wasn't paying attention when BP'ing one morning). And it took quite a while before I could really put some weight back on it, and I have to be extra careful now, since it'll always be prone to tearing again.
     

    hondo1312

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    After a good workout I generally feel like I am going to give up my breakfast. A few hours later, I feel pretty good.
    I can't eat before I workout. It's an hour commute from my gym to my office, so by the time I get to work, I feel like I can eat. This morning was strict pull-ups, kb swings, and Echo bike sprints...I'm certain I would've seen my breakfast if I had ate prior.
     

    MarinePMI

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    Yeah, I always eat post work out since I work out in the morning. Coffee is about all I have, with the exception of when I"m really feeling burned out. Then I pop a few large sweet tarts before working out.

    Heavy squats or deadlifts are what sometimes leave me wanting to puke...
     
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    Choid

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    Yeah, I always eat post work out since I work out in the morning. Coffee is about all I have, with the exception of when I"m really feeling burned out. Then I pop a few large sweet tarts before working out.

    Heavy squats or deadlifts are what sometimes leave me wanting to puke...
    I can't do it. I have oatmeal an hour before I work out. Like clockwork. Otherwise I am too flat.

    I squatted relatively heavy (for me) today on the belt squat. First working set was fucking cataclysmic but the next three felt like childs play. Almost recovered from an injury from Good Mornings, so I could probably get back under the bar, but I am really liking belt squats these days. I feel like I am getting old enough that I need to double my warm ups. I am going to end up like one of those people who has a relationship with his foam roller.
     

    MarinePMI

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    I can't do it. I have oatmeal an hour before I work out. Like clockwork. Otherwise I am too flat.

    I squatted relatively heavy (for me) today on the belt squat. First working set was fucking cataclysmic but the next three felt like childs play. Almost recovered from an injury from Good Mornings, so I could probably get back under the bar, but I am really liking belt squats these days. I feel like I am getting old enough that I need to double my warm ups. I am going to end up like one of those people who has a relationship with his foam roller.
    This definitely sounds like a warm up issue (and no, I don't mean a foam roller). Are you performing the exercise with progressively heavier weights, before pushing your working weight (to prime your CNS)?

    Also, is there a reason you're not doing a regular (high bar) or low bar barbell squat? Is it a lack of equipment, or some other reason?
     

    Choid

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    This definitely sounds like a warm up issue (and no, I don't mean a foam roller). Are you performing the exercise with progressively heavier weights, before pushing your working weights.

    Also, is there a reason you're not doing a regular (high bar) or low bar barbell squat? Is it a lack of equipment, or some other reason?
    Yeah, I busted my back up doing heavy good mornings a couple of months ago, so I am doing everything I can to squat while rehabbing my back. I don't need to throw five hundred plus pounds on my shoulders the way I feel now. The belt squat does double duty. I can still go heavy on my legs, but because of the nature of the apparatus, it tractions my spine as I squat. And yes, it was 4x6x485, which is 5 lbs more than Tuesday.
     

    Choid

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    This definitely sounds like a warm up issue (and no, I don't mean a foam roller). Are you performing the exercise with progressively heavier weights, before pushing your working weight (to prime your CNS)?

    Also, is there a reason you're not doing a regular (high bar) or low bar barbell squat? Is it a lack of equipment, or some other reason?
    Oh, I misread your question about warm ups. Yeah, of course. I ramp up doing 5s adding a plate to each side each successive set. It was just one of those days where what usually seems like enough wasn't quite enough, if you know what I mean.
     
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    Slab74

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    As a high school principal, I have my own weight room that I can use at my pleasure. But I still hate working out. I should be honest, I hate the first 5 minutes of my 60 minutes of circuit training. Once it’s over, I feel great. I’m not getting any younger and if it allows me a few more years of drinking bourbon, it’s worth it.
     

    Statusquo

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    Yes, hate them, or probably more accurately the people in them.

    Depends on your goals. If swole is the goal, going to have to buy the plates. If cardio, you should be outside doing that anyway (running on the treadmill is our punishment for everything we ever did wrong in life).

    I've settled somewhere in the middle. I use kettlebells to maintain strength, flexibility, and cardio, while still getting out a lot to hike and ruck in the mountains.

    None of which helps too much when you are traveling.

    +1 for kettlebells running and rucking. I throw in heavy bag, jump rope, and resistance bands too.
     

    Greg Langelius *

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    When I finished my most recent cycle of Cardiopulmonary Rehab, they provided me with a set of simplified (using common objects for apparatus, although I already had the treadmill) exercises. They're simple, and don't remind me of the gym crowd aspect. The exercises are modified/simplified to suit my condition

    I have no reasons to hate the gym.
     
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    E. Bryant

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    If you can't get your cardio up by lifting, you aren't lifting heavy enough for your current capabilities. I don't know how much you squat, for example, but I am in pretty good shape, and did a top set of 16 recently at 355 and I was about to fucking die. I imagine that would be true for anybody, though guys stronger than I would obviously need to lift higher weights.If you are lifting within your comfort zone. Even a true one rep or three rep max should have you fighting for o2.

    Sure, maybe I'm slacking in the gym. I only lift 2-3x/week and don't focus on any specific lifts, so I'm certainly well short of whatever modest generic limits with which I've been blessed. For example, my 1RM on deadlifts is around 2.2x bodyweight, so novice-level at best.

    But also consider than maybe I'm carrying less lean mass than you, because I'm not a big guy. And maybe my focus on endurance sports (specifically cycling) has left me with a different level of cardiac performance. And also consider that we may have substantial differences in the balance of fast vs. slow-twitch muscle fibers (some of this due to genetics, some due to training) that ultimately results in substantial differences in our response to a particular stimulus. And maybe you're going into the gym rested and I'm going in fatigued, and that results in less heart rate response to a 20-second set. Or maybe you're that guy at the gym who getting close to his established max heart rate because he does nothing but lift, and gets close to a coronary event each time a set goes past the 30-second mark.

    My point is that if you simply take your experiences (or that of those who are similarly trained) and apply them with a broad brush, you are unlikely to paint an accurate picture.

    Or, once again, maybe I'm just a pussy in the weight room. Lots of possibilities here.

    I'm assuming that you've got accurate heart rate measurement data (obtained from an EKG chest strap, not some bullshit optical measurement from a wrist device) that backs up your observations. If so, I'm hoping you'll follow my lead and share it, along with your max heart rate, aerobic threshold, lactate threshold, VO2max estimate, and total anaerobic capacity.

    Here's a sample of some of my data from the past few weeks:

    Screenshot_20210123-144727.png

    Screenshot_20210116-121842.png
    Screenshot_20210123-144946.png

    There is one mountain bike ride at about 0.8 intensity factor, a lifting session with sets of 8 reps on deadlifts, bench, lat pulldowns, and I-can't-remember-what-else, and then a lifting session that mostly consisted of a bunch of lighter weights and higher reps (walking barbell lunges, bodyweight dips, sit-ups, push-ups, etc.). FYI, the graphs are not necessarily in that order. See what you can tease from the data. Maybe it's that I'm a pussy.
     

    Choid

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    Sure, maybe I'm slacking in the gym. I only lift 2-3x/week and don't focus on any specific lifts, so I'm certainly well short of whatever modest generic limits with which I've been blessed. For example, my 1RM on deadlifts is around 2.2x bodyweight, so novice-level at best.

    But also consider than maybe I'm carrying less lean mass than you, because I'm not a big guy. And maybe my focus on endurance sports (specifically cycling) has left me with a different level of cardiac performance. And also consider that we may have substantial differences in the balance of fast vs. slow-twitch muscle fibers (some of this due to genetics, some due to training) that ultimately results in substantial differences in our response to a particular stimulus. And maybe you're going into the gym rested and I'm going in fatigued, and that results in less heart rate response to a 20-second set. Or maybe you're that guy at the gym who getting close to his established max heart rate because he does nothing but lift, and gets close to a coronary event each time a set goes past the 30-second mark.

    My point is that if you simply take your experiences (or that of those who are similarly trained) and apply them with a broad brush, you are unlikely to paint an accurate picture.

    Or, once again, maybe I'm just a pussy in the weight room. Lots of possibilities here.

    I'm assuming that you've got accurate heart rate measurement data (obtained from an EKG chest strap, not some bullshit optical measurement from a wrist device) that backs up your observations. If so, I'm hoping you'll follow my lead and share it, along with your max heart rate, aerobic threshold, lactate threshold, VO2max estimate, and total anaerobic capacity.

    Here's a sample of some of my data from the past few weeks:

    View attachment 7535513

    View attachment 7535515
    View attachment 7535516

    There is one mountain bike ride at about 0.8 intensity factor, a lifting session with sets of 8 reps on deadlifts, bench, lat pulldowns, and I-can't-remember-what-else, and then a lifting session that mostly consisted of a bunch of lighter weights and higher reps (walking barbell lunges, bodyweight dips, sit-ups, push-ups, etc.). FYI, the graphs are not necessarily in that order. See what you can tease from the data. Maybe it's that I'm a pussy.
    All of those things are possible, and I am not trying to insinuate that you are a pussy. Maybe you are ;). My point is that most people don't see lifting as a way to drive up your heart rate, but that anybody, if they push themselves to a true max set, be it one or twenty rep, is going to be pushing their cardio. But maxing is a learned skill, just like mountain biking. It is more than just doing as much as you can at a given point.

    The point is that if you turn squatting into a 400 meter sprint. That is to say if you are working your hardest for 45 seconds to a minute squatting, you are going to be gassed. Just like everybody in the Olympics is gassed after running the 400.

    FWIW, I am sure I would die riding a mountain bike. I hate riding bikes. I don't use a heart monitor, so I am not going to be able to share that info with you.
     

    Dta1

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    Personally, I can't stand gyms.

    Anybody else here hate gyms? And if so, what do you do to get your exercise in?

    Looking for some ideas on how to get more in shape, but in ways I would actually enjoy. I do enjoy doing bodyweight workouts at home or at the hotel (travel lots), I occasionally do yoga with the wife, and I'm looking at getting a cheap road bike.

    Looking to get some motivation and ideas from you guys that also hate gyms.
    I love biking— road and mtn. Have been riding since high school.

    I actually have a really nice road bike I’m going to list for sale if you’re interested. Would be willI get to trade for something. Pm me if you have any interest.
     

    E. Bryant

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    All of those things are possible, and I am not trying to insinuate that you are a pussy. Maybe you are ;). My point is that most people don't see lifting as a way to drive up your heart rate, but that anybody, if they push themselves to a true max set, be it one or twenty rep, is going to be pushing their cardio. But maxing is a learned skill, just like mountain biking. It is more than just doing as much as you can at a given point.

    The point is that if you turn squatting into a 400 meter sprint. That is to say if you are working your hardest for 45 seconds to a minute squatting, you are going to be gassed. Just like everybody in the Olympics is gassed after running the 400.

    FWIW, I am sure I would die riding a mountain bike. I hate riding bikes. I don't use a heart monitor, so I am not going to be able to share that info with you.

    The most probable conclusion to this discussion is that I'm a pussy in the gym - or at least someone who is adverse to getting jacked-up from going too heavy at this point in my life.

    My data suggests that sets of 8-10 reps on squats and deadlifts gets my heart rate to a level that some might consider to be high - about 165 BPM. But that's only a few BPM above my lactate threshold and 20 BPM short of my max heart rate, so it's not at all high from the perspective of an all-out anaerobic output (for comparison, I've seen an average of 160 BPM for a 3-hour race).

    Interestingly enough, I have seen higher peak heart rates by doing compound movements at relatively low weight and high reps. A good example is a standing low cable row combined with a single-leg step-up at bodyweight + 100 lbs for AMRAP; that's good for 175 BPM at the end. But that's a momentary number and doesn't compare to the duration I might see during a proper interval session on the bike.

    I'll conclude by saying that heart rate is generally a shitty way to characterize intensity or training load during short durations of activity. In cycling, we have power meters that do a much better job of capturing these efforts (typically in the form of a TSS, or Training Stress Score for a given workout). Heart rate can be used under quasi-steadystate conditions, but short durations of maximal effort won't properly be capturing using only heart rate data; I can do 10-15 seconds at a power level of about 5x my steady-state maximum, but yet my heart rate might not get within 30 BPM of my maximum if I roll into this sprint from a casual pace. This is where properly trained usage of perceived exertion has its place.
     

    kthomas

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    I love biking— road and mtn. Have been riding since high school.

    I actually have a really nice road bike I’m going to list for sale if you’re interested. Would be willI get to trade for something. Pm me if you have any interest.

    Appreciate the offer, but already have a bike!

    In fact, will be going on a little road ride tomorrow with the wife in the AM :)
     
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    Choid

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    That makes sense. Take your 8-10 rep squat weight and do an AMRAP with that. It might get you where you want to go.
    The most probable conclusion to this discussion is that I'm a pussy in the gym - or at least someone who is adverse to getting jacked-up from going too heavy at this point in my life.

    My data suggests that sets of 8-10 reps on squats and deadlifts gets my heart rate to a level that some might consider to be high - about 165 BPM. But that's only a few BPM above my lactate threshold and 20 BPM short of my max heart rate, so it's not at all high from the perspective of an all-out anaerobic output (for comparison, I've seen an average of 160 BPM for a 3-hour race).

    Interestingly enough, I have seen higher peak heart rates by doing compound movements at relatively low weight and high reps. A good example is a standing low cable row combined with a single-leg step-up at bodyweight + 100 lbs for AMRAP; that's good for 175 BPM at the end. But that's a momentary number and doesn't compare to the duration I might see during a proper interval session on the bike.

    I'll conclude by saying that heart rate is generally a shitty way to characterize intensity or training load during short durations of activity. In cycling, we have power meters that do a much better job of capturing these efforts (typically in the form of a TSS, or Training Stress Score for a given workout). Heart rate can be used under quasi-steadystate conditions, but short durations of maximal effort won't properly be capturing using only heart rate data; I can do 10-15 seconds at a power level of about 5x my steady-state maximum, but yet my heart rate might not get within 30 BPM of my maximum if I roll into this sprint from a casual pace. This is where properly trained usage of perceived exertion has its place.
     

    craigos

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    i started going to gym 6 days a week when i was 18, by 20 i torn/sprained a tendon in my shoulder such that i could even change gears in a manual shifter for 6 months. Then came uni, moving to the usa, marriage, family, career - in mid 40s and cause we working from home picked up weights since july, 6 days a week - had amazng effect on many aspects
     
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    E. Bryant

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    That makes sense. Take your 8-10 rep squat weight and do an AMRAP with that. It might get you where you want to go.

    Will try that the next time I feel fresh going into a weight session and report back with my findings.
     

    MarinePMI

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    I like going to my home gym. I hate public gyms.

    There's always someone curling in the squat rack, two bros hoarding the 45's while they talk about their new pre-workout drink, and yes, the screamer. There's always the screamer; the one that feels it a necessity that he (or she) let everyone within a 100 yd range know, that they are lifting heavy weights.

    Fuck that noise.

    Now that the Rona has shut down most gyms, and exercise equipment is almost as scarce as small pistol primers, I just chuckle and shake my head. ...as I rack another set of plates, take a sip of my morning coffee, log my work into my journal, and listen to a pod cast about long range shooting.

    Fuck public gyms...
     

    Army First

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    I miss going to the gym. Reduced hours of operation has everyone bunched up, all of the equipment taken. Due to limited availability of equipment we have to share said equipment. Reduced hours has defeated the purpose of social distancing.

    I have a limited amount of exercise equipment at home. The one thing I do have are public trails nearby and a backpack which, minus the tent, bag and rifle, is almost loaded for a back country hunt. I do squats and push ups during my hikes to prevent the onset of lard ass.