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Everyday Sniper Podcast, Phil Velayo

Lowlight

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  • Apr 12, 2001
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    Base of the Rockies
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    great conversation here
     
    I’m just an enthusiastic rifle guy who offers a couple training days a year for some local LEO agencies. Having listed all my relevant qualifications, allow me to inject a comment on the “Three Step”. I don’t exactly know what the three step is. I have however, considered heavily the benefit of knowing where to place your body and feet in the last “few steps” to a firing position. In those steps a shooter sets up to address the cover, or barricade, or whatever support that will be used. God knows I’m not gonna train them to run or crawl a 10k to get into position. How they choose to arrive at a firing point is beyond the scope of the focused training we do. I can damn sure train them to make smart moves close to the firing position to get ‘em into a shooting position more efficiently.
     
    Really enjoyed the discussion about what makes a “hunting” rifle. I was laughing listening to Frank relate a M40A1 to a hunting rifle as guess what, I am using my GAP M40A1 as a hunting rifle this year (with a improved NF 2.5-10 over mst so maybe not the same but meets the intent).

    Also, couldn’t agree more about the 3 step observation. I appreciate Phil’s honesty about training scars doing Caylen’s eval with the safety and bolt to the rear. I have always felt PR shooters were lazy (and rather undisciplined) when it came to using the safety. I understand how it has become over looked in this world of “bolt to the rear” in everything we do in the interest of safety when the real problem, in my opinion, is 1. They have a unsafe rifle due to extremely low trigger weight, that would fire if dropped or 2. they simply can’t follow the 4 basic safety rules because they are tying to move too fast on a clock that really doesn’t mean anything to win a match no one cares about next week. You don’t see this lack of safety use in the AR world.

    Anyway, rant over. Keep up the great work on the podcast. Oh, and here is a pic of the “non hunting rifle”.
     

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    The 3 step conversation was cut short and is part of a bigger observation we never got too.

    the 3 step I was talking about is how stages have been limited in terms of movement to 3 steps.

    we used to include as much movement as possible because like time, movement is another driver of stress.

    most stages had 25 yards or so of movement - now is 3 steps. They have crept closer and closer so to put the competitor on top of the prop.

    it was not a complete thought or discussion because we had to end the talk.
     
    As a noob, I enjoyed listening to two true experts, who see things pretty much the same, and who like and respect one another, elevate the conversation to the stuff that actually matters.

    It’s easy here to waste time going down a bunch of rabbit holes. Following you and Phil I know I’m learning stuff that matters not a bunch of voodoo or wasting my time.
     
    Great podcast, as always!
    2 questions:
    1. Could you elaborate on the way you carried the rifle that mitigated the wieght?
    2. I always (always!!) Find my that my scope rotates when i tighten the rings. I use quality rings (NF usually)- is there a type of rings that minimize that rotation? I have been looking at the American Rifle Co rings, and was intrigued by them as I thought they may be better than others in that regard.
    Your podcasts have been invaluable, many thanks!
     
    Great podcast! Why do you recommend a level on the scope over a level on the rail? I just feel like the scope one has a lot of leverage.

    I know you talked about the bipod helping level the rifle but what about if you are getting off your belly? ie baricade or fence. Im currently thinking about getting a anti cant device. Im new and am tryting to get a class with you next year.
     
    Great podcast! Why do you recommend a level on the scope over a level on the rail? I just feel like the scope one has a lot of leverage.

    I know you talked about the bipod helping level the rifle but what about if you are getting off your belly? ie baricade or fence. Im currently thinking about getting a anti cant device. Im new and am tryting to get a class with you next year.
    Let’s say you mount the level on the rifle. When you did this you made sure the rifle and reticle were level with each other. How would you know if your reticle slipped or your scoped moved off the bubble level is on the rifle?
     
    Let’s say you mount the level on the rifle. When you did this you made sure the rifle and reticle were level with each other. How would you know if your reticle slipped or your scoped moved off the bubble level is on the rifle?

    Yes everything needs to be level up the chain (rail, scope, anti-cant on scope) to get everything mounted correctly. I just feel like the rail is way more stable than having a lever attached to your scope that could get snagged and potentially twist it. If your reticle slipped or scope mount is off isn't having a level rail kinda the first step to mounting a scope or anti cant device on your scope? For instance "My rail level says im level but my reticle is at 11:30".

    I'm interested to hear what Frank says about it.
     
    I’ve listened to every episode. This ranks in the top 3 for me. Keep the awesome content coming Frank.
     
    It was really good, and surprisingly the response has been quiet
    I’m going to comment on Podbean every episode now because I fear you’ll stop doing them due to burnout or a lack of feedback. Keep up the good work, Frank, and thanks
     
    Never use a rail mounted level unless it can be tuned,

    there is nothing that says the rail is right or the level is correct in the wrapper, I am on the plane but I have pictures of guys buying scope leveling kits with 4 levels in it, and on a flat surface none from the kit agree. It‘s on here but I don’t recall where ...

    You want a scope mounted one so you can align it correctly to the shooter and the scope. All the bullet cares about is gravity so, we need the relationship with the scope to be level, but honestly the rifle does not have to be.

    If a shooter see the level is always off to the same side when they address the rifle that is set up issue. So rotating the scope with the level on it can fix that issue so you won’t have to look at the level after adjusting to the change. That way the body is not pushing it away.
     
    I can cant the rifle and rotate the scope back to level and everything is okay, there is minor offset, but it’s only .6” at 1000 because the rotation is small, now that 1/2 inch is with a 2 degree rotation but really for set up, most only use About .8 or less of induced cant if they could not adjust the stock.
     
    Hey guys. I have a bad habit of not checking Sniper's Hide enough.

    Huge thanks to @lowlight for having me on the Everyday Sniper Podcast. I enjoy our talks. Every time its just smooth sailing!

    Appreciate everyone's kind words.

    Couple of things.
    1. I know Frank and I differ on our opinions about scope levels, but from an instructor and training standpoint I understand Frank's point of view. Too many times I see shooters over rely on equipment before actually building a solid foundation without it. Two things that come to mind, are rifle slings and rear bags. Trust me, I'm a big fan of using a rear bag, especially a Game Changer in the back, but If you watch my videos, I always have control of the buttstock with my support hand. I typically rest my hand on the rear bag, to fill in the space that would be there if I wasn't shooting with a bag. That helps me control the recoil in the prone. I've talked about this in a YouTube video where shooter's "scoop" into the buttstock, while their buttstock is sitting on top of the bag. When they do that, they never establish a positive rifle to shoulder connection, and just rely strictly on the rear bag to support the back of the rifle. And then typically, a shooter will smash his face down on his/her buttstock because it's stable, but now the recoil management aspect suffers, causing the shooter's sight picture to drive high and left (right handed shooter) or high and right (left handed shooter).

    2. I'm a big fan of going to competitions to validate my training and put my money where my mouth is. I say this a lot, you learn more about your shooting ability at a 2 day match, than going to a precision rifle course. However, I've adopted some training scars from competition, like the bolt to the rear versus using the mechanical safety. In the Marine Corps we always had the rifle condition 1 (magazine inserted, round in chamber, weapon on safe, bolt closed) every time we left the wire. Even when I was teaching at the schoolhouse we taught using the safety. But now, because "bolt to the rear" is a thing in the PR world, I've unfortunately have some back peddling to do.

    Anyways. I'll try to visit here more often! Thanks again for listening and thanks Frank for having me on. Always forward to our next one and keep doing your thing.
     
    Maybe this has been covered before, but what is it about gain twist that allows it to perform better over a wide spectrum.

    Also my personal beef with "The hunting rifle" is they always make hunting rifles super lightweight. NIce on the hike, Bad on the shot. Maybe some guys like a 7lb 300 Win Mag but not me (Plus if you are successful you still have to haul that giant animal out that still weighs A LOT more than any rifle).

    And while it ccan be done, it tough to get a threaded barrel on those pencil barrels for the suppressor and all the cool kids hunt with their suppressor if they can because OTHERWISE WE GO DEAF.