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Maggie’s Funny & awesome pics, vids and memes thread (work safe, no nudity)

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For better or worse, quite a lot of the parts that went into the planes were built in smaller shops and then transported to a final assembly plant. Since these shops were so dispersed, it was more difficult for the bombing crews to destroy all of them.

Before LeMay took over, bombing was done for high altitude and used mostly high explosive bombs. This was ineffective and Lemay switched to low altitude incendiary bombing. Some my not know that more civilians were killed in the fire bombing raids than when Little Boy and Fat Man were dropped.


Not to mention that in century bombs were fairly cheap to produce… compared to what it cost to make weapons grade plutonium, and uranium.

The only time nukes have become a potential wonder weapon is when we changed the B61 bomb into a smart bomb (the Mod 12).

So now we can put 150kT nuke through a doorway from 20 miles away…. Using a fighter to deliver it at Mach 1.5…
 
Stupid Japanese. I'm reading a history of the IJN.

The plant that made the Zero used oxen to haul the planes to the nearest airfield 20+ miles away. When the oxen got old, they used percherons. Building an airfield at the plant never occurred to them.

Their original naval aviators were basically kids on the PHD track in high school. Over 90% washed out because training was so harsh. They would literally beat them.

The aviators would be put on the front lines forever. Never rotated back to train others or allowed to get rest. And no plan to replace lost pilots. The aviators were not systematically interviewed on how to make things better.

The Navy had both officers and enlisted flying planes. The enlisted would come back after flying then made to stand watch, do KP, shine the officers shoes, etc. The officers were arrogant pricks who could not fly yet made all the decisions.

Every time senior IJN leadership would plan an operation but not validate their assumptions. Senior leaders were not visiting every base constantly.

The IJN had a habit of not focusing on the goal of the operation. They did it over and over and over again. At Pearl Harbor, they did not follow ups with a third or fourth strike or bombard Pearl and the US installations. As a result the dry docks, harbor facilities, runways, construction equipment, fuel depot, and stores were all intact. The IJN always got cold feet. The Indian Ocean raids, Guadalcanal, Battle of Philippines - and many others - the IJN did not go for the jugular.

A lot of other Americans when war-gamed Pearl, would have had the heavy battleships empty their magazines into Pearl with the planes flying CAP. Pearl was the main base of the US in the Pacific - I would have landed a Division and taken it. Razed it.
When was that book written - the 50s.

There is some truth in your statement but there is an equal or an extra amount of BS.
 
He's posturing on the ground. Sign of a serious brain injury. One kid's going to hospital for a long time and will have permenant long term issues , the other is getting charged with a serious assault.

Two lives fucked up over words.

Yeah.
Don't give a shit.
Certain folks need to start realizing they aren't "special".
 
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Did you know there is a piece of fossilized Viking poop so well-preserved, one paleoscatologist called it as “precious as the crown jewels.” Archaeologists have dated the dung back to the ninth century, when what’s now York, England, was ruled by Norse warrior-kings.
This coprolite (fossilized feces) was discovered in 1972 in York under what was to become a local bank. It has been named the Lloyds Bank coprolite, or more colloquially, the Lloyds Bank turd.
Paleoscatologists determined that the human who deposited this now-renowned, seven-inch specimen had a diet of meat and bread.
The poop is on display in the museum section of the Jorvik Viking Centre inside a glass box.
 
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Did you know there is a piece of fossilized Viking poop so well-preserved, one paleoscatologist called it as “precious as the crown jewels.” Archaeologists have dated the dung back to the ninth century, when what’s now York, England, was ruled by Norse warrior-kings.
This coprolite (fossilized feces) was discovered in 1972 in York under what was to become a local bank. It has been named the Lloyds Bank coprolite, or more colloquially, the Lloyds Bank turd.
Paleoscatologists determined that the human who deposited this now-renowned, seven-inch specimen had a diet of meat and bread.
The poop is on display in the museum section of the Jorvik Viking Centre inside a glass box.
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I would respectfully disagree with historians who believe that Midway and Coral Sea were turning points.

IMHO, Doolittle's Tokyo raid was the turning point. The raid scared the Japanese to death. After the raid, Yamamoto's plans for Midway were accelerated and for good reason. Midway could be used as a staging base for future raids.

After learning that post strike bases were in China, the Japanese increased their war effort in that theater and diverted a couple of aircraft carriers from operations in the Aleutian Islands.

Even though the raid had little immediate military effect the psychological effect it had on the Japanese military leadership and their decision making served to be a force-multiplier.
+/- but good thoughts. the best the IJN could do was yamamoto and he was marginal at best. constantly dividing his forces and setting these complicated coordinated ops that 40s comm tech couldn't do. not close to a match for spruance,turner,mitcher.
 
Probably.

But was only counting good guys.

Though I guess by that standard, the Red army gets the dubious honor. But they were only temporary good guys.

So I’ll clarify with “any American MOS…” so to speak! And it may be as a percentage. Because we lost a ton of aircrews over Europe, too.

Sirhr
have heard it said that if 1 was in a waffen ss tank unit in russia had a better chance to survive the war than flying in defense of the reich.
US marine in pacific landings had better chance of surviving the war than flying in 8th AF during bomber offensive.
not sure if true,have read that somewhere.
 
Good news for the future: Most of the gas giants in our solar system alone and their satellites like Titan and Io, are FULL of the same compositions as crude oil or are entirely made of hydrocarbons. Once we begin slowly expanding through the solar system, entire industries dedicated to making products from hydrocarbons can be built to orbit or placed directly on the surfaces of these worlds for an infinite supply of raw material. In the farther future when the Solar System has been fully opened to human development and settlement, the worlds of Titan, Io, Ganymede, Europa, etc., might become the flagship homes and operating bases of entire corporations with names like "Ganymede Enterprises" producing goods based on the composition of the worlds that they chose to settle. Mercury, on it's side permanently facing away from the Sun, would very likely be host to a variety of companies producing weaponry from small arms to planetary defense railguns and spacecraft armament, as that planet is very rich in iron and other metals. Further up in orbit and carefully shielded from the Sun's brutal output at that distance, in the Mercurian night, might be shipyards, city and even country sized facilities building the leviathian freighters, exploration vessels, and military cruisers that would open the gateway to nearby stars...
Mercury isn't tidally locked to the sun. It takes Mercury about 59 Earth days to spin once on its axis (the rotation period), and about 88 Earth days to complete one orbit about the Sun.Mercury orbits the Sun in a 3:2 spin–orbit resonance, meaning that relative to the background stars, it rotates on its axis exactly three times for every two revolutions it makes around the Sun.[a][21] Counterintuitively, due to Mercury's slow rotation, an observer on the planet would see only one Mercurian solar day (176 Earth days) every two Mercurian solar years (88 Earth days each).
My Google Fu is strong.
 
Mercury isn't tidally locked to the sun. It takes Mercury about 59 Earth days to spin once on its axis (the rotation period), and about 88 Earth days to complete one orbit about the Sun.Mercury orbits the Sun in a 3:2 spin–orbit resonance, meaning that relative to the background stars, it rotates on its axis exactly three times for every two revolutions it makes around the Sun.[a][21] Counterintuitively, due to Mercury's slow rotation, an observer on the planet would see only one Mercurian solar day (176 Earth days) every two Mercurian solar years (88 Earth days each).
My Google Fu is strong.
Stupid mercury