Has anyone used a lead sled two or lead sled?

Edsel

Sergeant of the Hide
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Jun 9, 2013
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Really don't know - it helps a lot when one's establishing the initial zero, but after that it's usually the bipod or using the front section only.

It's a nice convenience to have.
 

Hattrick

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Jan 16, 2014
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We have one of the first ones that came out. Use it mostly for mule kicking calibers and pattern 3 1/2 "turkey loads. Defiantly reduces recoil as much as 80-90% if you add enough weight. Luv it
 

Mark williams

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Mar 8, 2013
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First, it's not a real post count. That number is just there as a distraction for people who like to make criticisms based on other peoples' post counts. It's the Internet equivalent of a shiny object.

Second, I never claimed that the barrel knows anything at all.

Third, have a look at a previous thread about led sleds and watch the effect that you claim doesn't exist.

http://www.snipershide.com/shooting...recoil-affect-accuracy-lead-sled-vs-bags.html
Graham, once you get to 25000 post their must be a pot of gold waiting on you. Haha! It seems to bother a lot of people about their or someone elses post count. Me, I could care wether I had 1 or 50000, unless their truly is a big pot of gold!
 

wdebo

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Mar 31, 2009
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They do come in handy for safari calibers. A 600 NE beats you to death no matter how you get behind it.
 

GrantA

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Jul 7, 2010
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Here's a good one- I pulled up to the 100yd range a few months or so back and notice a guy all set up with a lead sled. Figured it must be a heavy hitter, guess what? 17hmr....

Sent from my DROID RAZR HD using Tapatalk
 

shootmore

Private
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Jul 27, 2018
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I have been using a Caldwell led sled, for 6+ years. Load developed for over 30 rifles in multiple disciplines, Silhouette, PRS, F-TR, Service rifle etc. I really do shootmore :). Well Junior and I do so typically were building two or more rifles for each discipline. We have our own machine shop, a trade I picked up 35 years ago. We chamber our own barrels. Make a lot of our own parts.
We never hang anything off the barrel and never strap down a rifle during load development. That would change the barrel harmonics. Sometimes we add sand bags to the sled sometimes not but are always consistent for that rifle while searching for that elusive single hole load. See the Lab Radar in the picture. We use it for velocity at the muzzle and using an electronic target down range that measures POI FPS we compare and seek similar trends while doing ladder analysis.

We do get consistent results load developing this way. First we ladder test at 500 yards, then OCW at 100 yards, then jump test at 100 yards. This method has produced match winning rifles. Rifles that have beaten all comers in our state at least once. Junior has broken six NRA national records. Point is I think we are doing a few things right. First is starting with a rifle, and load up to the task of shooting a perfect score.

I read this thread because I questioned my methods having watched an old bench-rest shooter for years always using just a bag and a bi-pod with good results. Then I realized that his entire rig is set up for that. I have concluded that by taking as much of the human variable out (using the sled) we end up with more consistent results.

Having done extensive testing on so many rifles I have found that some of my skills improve while testing using the sled. For example, NPA, breathing, trigger control and overall ability to focus on each and every shot for 100+ shots. Yeah go out and shoot 180 rounds in a session 3 or 4x a month. That will do it. It is not a replacement for slinging up prone or offhand practice but over the years I do accredit some of my skill improvements to the added trigger time while load developing using the sled.
 

Cclary60

Private
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Apr 8, 2020
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Arkansas
I have a Lead Sled, and I barely use it because with any decent sized caliber it will recoil and come up off the shooting bench, even with weight on the sled.