Heaviest bullet for .243 with 9 twist

EscapeVelocity

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I've done a little digging here and there on the subject, but not much of a consensus. I am buying a 26" criterion .243 barrel with a 9 twist, and wondering if I can stabilize Hornady's 107 ELD bullet? I know there is some degree on what one's individual barrel might do.

I see they have a 105 bthp match bullet, and that seems to be a safe bet, so I can't imagine the 107 being much different, even tho they are a different bullet.

I am also going to try the 103 ELD and something else near the 100 grain range.
Any other suggestions?
 

GIXXER2000

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    Looking at Berger's web site shows 90 Gr as optimal for 1-9 twist. In my .243 I have a 26in 1-7.5 barrel made and I shoot 115 DTAC which according to their list should be a 1-7 Twist. I would think the 103 even the 105 would be about as heavy as I would go with the 1-9 twist.
     
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    FCS

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    9 twist I'd stay 95 Berger VLD or lighter.
    I've seen guys try heavier bullets in 9 twist and it works....until wind blows and then their scores at distance take a disproportionate hit. If you want to run the longer ogive, higher BC bullets then get an 8 twist at minimum and a 7.5 wouldn't hurt you any.
    There can be a pretty fair difference between a 105 and a 107, all depends on ogive profile and transition shape.
    If you want to run 100+ gr bullet that is over 12 caliber ogive, get an 8 twist at minimum.

    "Problem" with a 9 twist an heavy bullets is it'll appear to work but will get squirrely in wind, make you pull your hair out and start questioning this, that and a couple other things. Keep your sanity, buy faster twist barrel or if you do go with 9 twist, shoot lighter bullets. YMMV.
     
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    EscapeVelocity

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    9 twist I'd stay 95 Berger VLD or lighter.
    I've seen guys try heavier bullets in 9 twist and it works....until wind blows and then their scores at distance take a disproportionate hit. If you want to run the longer ogive, higher BC bullets then get an 8 twist at minimum and a 7.5 wouldn't hurt you any.
    There can be a pretty fair difference between a 105 and a 107, all depends on ogive profile and transition shape.
    If you want to run 100+ gr bullet that is over 12 caliber ogive, get an 8 twist at minimum.

    "Problem" with a 9 twist an heavy bullets is it'll appear to work but will get squirrely in wind, make you pull your hair out and start questioning this, that and a couple other things. Keep your sanity, buy faster twist barrel or if you do go with 9 twist, shoot lighter bullets. YMMV.
    I see the 95 grain match bullets, and I'm thinking of giving them a try. It's just a habit to chase the highest BC. At least I'll get a little more velocity with the lighter bullets. Do you have any to recommend?
     

    FCS

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    I like big bullets, I can not deny! 105 hybrid, 115 Berger VLD and 115 DTAC RBT is what I run depending on barrel twist and cartridge.
    Haven't loaded any mid-weight 6mm (95 gr +/-) so unable to recommend much there. 87 Vmax from 9, and even 10, twist 243 was easily minute of prairie dog out to 5-600.
    Did 8 twist for 6mm (6BR and 243) until 7.7 and 7.5 twist barrels became available.
    Punching paper and steel or dropping coyotes, deer, antelope?
     

    EscapeVelocity

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    I like big bullets, I can not deny! 105 hybrid, 115 Berger VLD and 115 DTAC RBT is what I run depending on barrel twist and cartridge.
    Haven't loaded any mid-weight 6mm (95 gr +/-) so unable to recommend much there. 87 Vmax from 9, and even 10, twist 243 was easily minute of prairie dog out to 5-600.
    Did 8 twist for 6mm (6BR and 243) until 7.7 and 7.5 twist barrels became available.
    Punching paper and steel or dropping coyotes, deer, antelope?
    I'll be shooting steel out to 1k, and the occasional match. What I like about this caliber, is that it will do all of the above fairly well without recoil, and plenty of bullets and brass to choose from.
     

    FCS

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    I'd get an 8 twist at minimum, 7.7 or 7.5 wouldn't hurt you any for the bullets you mentioned using in the OP.
    9 twist might work, probably will not work consistently.
    I'm a big bullet fan, make sure you have enough twist. Better off to have a little too much twist then too little.

    Best wishes on your project.
     

    sandwarrior

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    Agree with the above advice, get a tighter twist. A 1-9 barely stabilizes the 105-108 class projectiles. Aerodynamic disruption (wind, transonic range) have adverse effects on bullets barely stabilized. Much less effect on a well stabilized bullet. A 1-8 twist will fully stabilize them as well as the 115's. Although with the 115's you run into the same problem.

    So if you want to run them all get the 1-7.5 or 7.7 twist.
     
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    my human host

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    I've tried 95 grain TMK's and Berger 105 VLD's in 2 different Remington factory 9.25 twist barrels. Sometimes they would shoot well. Sometimes the temp would drop 10 degrees and they would shoot 3-4 inches at 100yds.

    Both barrels shot well with 95 grain VLD's.

    I've tried the 95 grain TMK's in a true 9 twist 6 Creed and they were stable. 105 grain VLD's were not.
     
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    pitdog85

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    9 twist I'd stay 95 Berger VLD or lighter.
    I've seen guys try heavier bullets in 9 twist and it works....until wind blows and then their scores at distance take a disproportionate hit. If you want to run the longer ogive, higher BC bullets then get an 8 twist at minimum and a 7.5 wouldn't hurt you any.
    There can be a pretty fair difference between a 105 and a 107, all depends on ogive profile and transition shape.
    If you want to run 100+ gr bullet that is over 12 caliber ogive, get an 8 twist at minimum.

    "Problem" with a 9 twist an heavy bullets is it'll appear to work but will get squirrely in wind, make you pull your hair out and start questioning this, that and a couple other things. Keep your sanity, buy faster twist barrel or if you do go with 9 twist, shoot lighter bullets. YMMV.

    Hi can you please elaborate on this. Why do they start to perform badly when the wind starts blowing yet are ok without the wind just looking to learn
     

    sandwarrior

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    Hi can you please elaborate on this. Why do they start to perform badly when the wind starts blowing yet are ok without the wind just looking to learn

    The rotational force a bullet receives from a tighter twisted barrel makes the bullet want to stabilize around the axis it was fired from. A slower twist will impart less energy and make the bullet less stable.

    A bullet is going to be affected by wind either way. It tends to point it's nose toward the wind a little as it goes downrange. the stronger rotational force wants to keep it more on the path it was launched on. Less rotational energy is simply going to mean the bullet will become unstable sooner. Also, that the wind can affect it more in the way described during it's flight. A barely stabilized bullet has a very small margin that it can be disrupted by the wind.

    If that helps
     

    greybeardsarrowhead

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    The rotational force a bullet receives from a tighter twisted barrel makes the bullet want to stabilize around the axis it was fired from. A slower twist will impart less energy and make the bullet less stable.

    A bullet is going to be affected by wind either way. It tends to point it's nose toward the wind a little as it goes downrange. the stronger rotational force wants to keep it more on the path it was launched on. Less rotational energy is simply going to mean the bullet will become unstable sooner. Also, that the wind can affect it more in the way described during it's flight. A barely stabilized bullet has a very small margin that it can be disrupted by the wind.

    If that helps
    That is one of the most eloquently simple descriptions given to that question I've ever heard. "Less thunder, more Lightning"