Looking for a wood stove

Sean the Nailer

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  • May 20, 2006
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    I helped install a 'good one' about 20 years ago. That bastard was heavy. Much heavier than any that we had on the farms/ranches, growing up.

    The biggest thing about it, was it was "air-tight" as well as had a "catalytic converter". No, I can't remember the brand at the moment, but after all the fuss of putting it in, once it was lit, HOLY CRAP did it put out a LOT of heat. And the wood just 'smouldered'. You don't want 'flame' in that process, as the flame is burning the gases that you want to get converted in the catalytic converter.

    Yeah, you can get 'good' woodstoves nowadays. You're going to PAY for it/them though.

    Oh, and one other thing. Outside, at the peak of the exhaust vent/chimney (B-Vent????) there was NO smoke, just a bit of a 'heat mirage' coming out of there. It was incredibly efficient, compared with "the old way" of doing things.
     
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    Sniperwannabee

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  • Feb 14, 2017
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    I helped install a 'good one' about 20 years ago. That bastard was heavy. Much heavier than any that we had on the farms/ranches, growing up.

    The biggest thing about it, was it was "air-tight" as well as had a "catalytic converter". No, I can't remember the brand at the moment, but after all the fuss of putting it in, once it was lit, HOLY CRAP did it put out a LOT of heat. And the wood just 'smouldered'. You don't want 'flame' in that process, as the flame is burning the gases that you want to get converted in the catalytic converter.

    Yeah, you can get 'good' woodstoves nowadays. You're going to PAY for it/them though.

    Oh, and one other thing. Outside, at the peak of the exhaust vent/chimney (B-Vent????) there was NO smoke, just a bit of a 'heat mirage' coming out of there. It was incredibly efficient, compared with "the old way" of doing things.
    I think one of the better ones are Canadian
     

    wh20crazy

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    Oct 29, 2018
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    We moved into a new to us house in January. It has a Big John. I like the glass in the door. There are diverters to send heated air out the front and/or sides. It works, but the fan has only one speed, LOUD. Propane is expensive.

    I have a chimney sweep buddy who gets calls to remove stoves and inserts. He says there is no market for them, so he sells them to the scrap metal guy.
     
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    Alpine 338

    Lumberjack
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    Jun 26, 2010
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    Quadra-Fire hands down.

    No Catalytic Converter, rated as the most efficient stoves on the market.

    I run mine 24/7 six months a year. Heats 2400+ sqft, and I use it as my primary heating source when I'm home. I keep my thermostat set at 62-deg, and the only time the furnace kicks on is when I'm away.

    IMG_20201114_143905427~2.jpg

    Pictured stove is 15-years old. Dealer said to go with 8" stove pipe as I have almost 30' feet of rise. I installed a cold air kit when building the house. Draws cold air from the outside through 4" metal duct into the bottom of the stove, so you're not pulling as much warm air from inside the house, and sucking cold air through window and door seals.

    My next build will be the same exact stove. I have a close friend who is a stove dealer, who I met a few years after buying and installing this stove, and he said I made a good choice with my set up.

    Stove burns so clean, I only have to sweep it every four or five years. I only burn lodgepole pine with the occasional aspen, and usually wake up in the morning to hot coals still in the stove.
     
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    Alpine 338

    Lumberjack
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    Jun 26, 2010
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    Forgot to mention. Make a decision on what you want the purpose of your stove to be. If Primary Heat, or Backup Primary Heat, get it out of you thought process that you want a low cost or elegant looking stove. Focus on efficiency, reliability, heat output, and size of firebox.

    Between my neighbors, friends, and my buddy who sells stoves, I constantly hear stories how people who purchased stoves based on cost, or how fancy they looked, and then found out later that they are totally unhappy with the performance of their stoves. Typically its the same story; hard to get a fire started, hard to keep the fire sustained unless it's running wide open, and/or they wake up in the morning to a cold stove, and have to repeat the process of starting a fire.

    With my Quadra-Fire, I can get a fire going with a single sheet of newspaper, a few small sticks of wood, and a couple pieces of kindling. After a few minutes of burning full size pieces of wood, it's like a blast furnace in the stove, and I can dampen it down without it smoldering or burning out.

    Then there's friends who need an entire newspaper, and a ton of kindling to start a fire.

    IMG_20200908_185318077_HDR.jpg
     

    BullGear

    Huckleberry Dillinger
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  • Nov 29, 2017
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    Look for a specialty store in your area. We have one in our neck of the woods and they will get you whatever you want.
     

    Sean the Nailer

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  • May 20, 2006
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    I had completely forgotten to mention, and am glad it was brought-up above. For ANY fire-breather, you truly DO have to put in a "combustion air supply" otherwise you'll be sucking in air through every door, window, and crack-in-the-wall throughout your house. In doing so, you'll be 'cooling off' each and every room that you're trying to warm-up.

    So that we're all clear, (because I've found some that just don't "get it") all that air/exhaust/heat going up and out of your chimney, needs to enter the house to begin with. It don't just invent itself (see what I did there?) or create itself in the firebox.

    The proper addition and insulating of a 'combustion air intake' will make a HUGE difference in the effect and efficiency of whatever you decide to install.

    Good luck.
     
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    MrSmith

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    Nov 19, 2009
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    We heated with wood for years. Then went to coal. It's great. If you live in an area where coal is available I highly recommend it. There are a few little tricks to be learned like how to bank the fire and how to open the stove door to keep the fine ash and smoke out of the house. Look for a quality stove you like that will burn either. Choices are good.

    Now that I'm a few years older and not as tolerant of the fetchin' and totin' aspects I have gone back to heating with wood. I keep a stick next to my chair and use it to push the thermostat up a mite if I catch a chill.

    Pellet stove for backup.

    Thank you,
    MrSmith
     

    Angus Sloth

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    Apr 11, 2018
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    I bought one for a very specific application - tight house, make up air, etc.


    Fantastic stove, but expensive. The soapstone emits heat for hours after the fire goes out.

    As a side note two house near me burned down because the stove was not installed correctly. Please take your time and do it right....
     

    Angus Sloth

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    Apr 11, 2018
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    Also... As New England kid I was always told to never ever use Pine or any softwood - it had to be dried oak or maple. For fear of creosote.

    Turns out that was not true. Creosote is a mixture of smoke and moisture. As long as your wood is well dried you can burn any wood. BTUs will vary but pine is fine if its dry.

    The guy installing our stove call me a "New England Hardwood Snob".... lol....
     

    Alpine 338

    Lumberjack
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    Jun 26, 2010
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    great info guys, i didnt even know about a combustion air supply I can see how that woud help alot. Do most wood stoves have a supply duct? for that?

    Some do, some don't. My cold air kit was like a $40 option. But I had to supply the additional 4" ducting and outside weather guard.

    My stove base is open under the pedistal which is where the combustion air is drawn from. Some stoves just suck in combustion air from the back or sides, and are not really designed for a (cold air or outside air) combustion air source.
     
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    Alpine 338

    Lumberjack
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    Jun 26, 2010
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    One more thing, don't go blindly ordering a stove off the internet.

    Most, if not all the States now require your stove to be EPA certified for residential use. The only way around that, if the stove is also sold as a cook-stove, or it's installed outside of a residence like garage, workshop, hunting cabin, etc.
     

    Alphatreedog

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    Feb 15, 2017
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    +1 on the Hydra Fire . I have a Quadra Fire model going on 18 years and it was used when I installed it .
     
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    Jgunner

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  • Jul 29, 2019
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    I ended up with a cubic mini grizzly in my hunt shack. Still gotta install it, but it seems like its super good quality. Only rated for a few hundred sf at tops though. Its friggin tiny! But so is my shack. Plus it doesn’t get super cold where its at, 20’s are about as cold as it gets.
     

    Spock

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    May 23, 2012
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    In that order and had them all. If you have a tall chimney cold air intake a must if you don’t want to fill the house with smoke when lighting it. Negative pressure in basements with the tall chimney won’t draft properly until it’s good and hot
     
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    Angus Sloth

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    Apr 11, 2018
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    The air intake or make up air is also for super insulated houses. You don't want to be pulling against your insulation and air tight barriers.
     
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    Maggot

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  • Jul 27, 2007
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    Ive had several and the best of the bunch was a Warm Morning but I dont think they make them anymore. Had to leave on a Friday for the weekend one cold winter and filled it with logs, damped it down. When I came back on Sunday evening it still ahd a good coal bed and the house was warm.






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    LeftyJason

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  • Mar 8, 2017
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    Are we in a stove thread or a car thread? All this talk of cold air intakes makes me think it could be either.
     

    oneshotmike

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    Sep 1, 2017
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    Jotul, going strong for a decade so far.... very well built stove and one of the oldest manufacturers in the business.
     

    nightman

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    Oct 23, 2018
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    #1 on buck stove also quadrafire will run you out of the house when you get it rolling that's montana winters
     

    Sgtsideways

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    Feb 7, 2021
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    Had a Quadrafire in the 90's and it was a great stove. Big box easy to start up. A few years back, I bought a new one and it sucks. The boxes are a lot smaller and they are a bitch to get started, even with 2 yr old seasoned wood. Once they do fire up, you can look forward to having to refill about every 6- 8 hours. If you are heating a large house, you'll be getting up in the wee hours to refill.
    When I asked the retailer why the smaller box he said it was due to epa rules. If I had to do it over again, I would not purchase.
     

    apmech

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    May 6, 2010
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    +1 for Quadafire. I installed a 4300 step top, when I built my house 20 years ago. It has been my main heat source for the entire time. Only time the propane fueled furnace is used is when I'm out of town. They aren't cheap, but the cheap ones don't come close to the quality.

    The boxes are a lot smaller
    Are you sure you have the same model? Current specs on the 4300 look like what I have on my 20 yr old one.
     
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    mtrmn

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  • Oct 7, 2009
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    These people make good stuff. They used to have a much bigger selection of wood stoves and I have one of their older models, a Consolidated Dutchwest Federal convection heater. Too much wood or air and it will put out enough heat to make you open doors and windows. ETA-bought mine in 1989.
     

    jinxx4ever

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  • Sep 26, 2013
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    Earth Stove, my ceilings are 18' high. 8" stove pipe all the way up. Stove is over 30 yrs old. I've had it since 02 when i built my house. Was my brothers , father-in-law till he died and his widow didn't want to mess with it. keeps our house a nice 74-76. Does it pull a little air from the outside? maybe, but with the volume of sq ft in my home, no big deal. In actuality, u want a little fresh air coming into your home. A lot of sickness in families has proven to be from modern homes built to air tight. Your house needs to breath.