making a laminate stock.

nashlaw

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Jul 16, 2006
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manchester, tn
Re: making a laminate stock.

Recently, a member posted about making a laminated stock himself. His skill and talent is far beyond me, but he did a good job.
If I am not mistaken, Rutland Plywood makes most of the stocks for the manufacturers. They use heat and pressure to fuse the sheets of wood, but I would think you could get good results with Gorilla glue and heavy clamps. The inletting is going to have you putting a lot of quarters in your cuss box.
 

slewfoot812

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May 29, 2010
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twin falls,idaho
Re: making a laminate stock.

i was thinking about laying my action on its side and scribe each piece as i go untill i have the complete action enclose. does anyone have some advice? type glue? best stain? i have a pattern picke out already.
 

sotexhill

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Apr 1, 2010
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Re: making a laminate stock.

Short answer is no, I haven't. But, since we have decided to assist our grandkids with college (long story on their parents' priorities), something like this may be in my future rather than the olive drab AICS 1.5 I was planning for my R5 a week ago.

Here are some thoughts if you wish.

I think that 1/2 inch or thinner plywood is typically made of three layers, with the two outer layers oriented in one direction and the inner layer oriented at a 90 degree angle. 3/8's, 5/16's, or 1/4 inch plywood will have a proportionately thinner center layer. I don't know if it is better to have the layers of a laminated stock all oriented longitudinally, or some of them oriented up and down. I think that factory laminated stocks are all oriented longitudinally.

One of the outside layers of plywood is frequently visually impaired with patches. More expensive plywood will have good (clear of patches) exteriors on both sides. Marine plywood uses a glue which is more impervious to moisture.

I don't know why one could not pattern a laminated stock after whatever stock one fancied. I personally think that alternating green and black looks good in a laminated stock, and even has a certain amount of camoflage.

I have seen a few used laminated varmint stocks in various for sale venues. Maybe someone more knowledgable in stock making will chime in.

Hmmm.
 

slewfoot812

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May 29, 2010
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Re: making a laminate stock.

well i may give it a try for the hell of it, it wouldnt be the first time i made firewood. got all the clamps and stuff. plus a firs aid kit
 

slewfoot812

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May 29, 2010
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Re: making a laminate stock.

i was thinking about using contact cement. that stuff works great for glueing formica to your counter top. that would look good using green and black alternate.
 

slewfoot812

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May 29, 2010
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Re: making a laminate stock.

look at the stock mckinneymike (my new rifle stock build) SWEET!!!! (#1840931-SNIPERS HIDE BOLT ACTION RIFLES) four posts down from this one, GUY DID FANTASTIC JOB
 

McKinneyMike

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Minuteman
Re: making a laminate stock.

Slewfoot, the problems with trying to use plywoods is even the best grades use less than perfect quality veneers for the inner layers, plus the glues that are used will not do well in the elements. Delamination is always an issue.

If you have a source available that can order directly from Rutland Plywood (the largest supplier to the rifle stock industry) their blanks are made from solid birch veneers and epoxied together vs standard glues and under high pressure clamping system.

I sell figured and exotic hardwood lumber (I used to own Curly Woods) and have been around the industry for many years.

Stick to an established and proven product(Rutland Plywood) if you want to try to make a stock yourself.

If you attempt to make a blank like the one that I made, you have to be extremely painstaking in your preparation of the materials, glue choices and have a lot of good quality clamps available! I used 19 Bessey K-Body clamps for my stock lamination. My wood was not plywood though, I used dimensional exotic hardwoods and planed/sanded them to the final thicknesses that were required for the look and stock pattern that I had Joel build for me.

Different glues have different "working times" so it is best to fully understand their pluses and minuses well. Some will have more "open time" that allows you to work a little slower while others have very little "open time", but have superior bonding strength and resistance to environmental changes.

As in anything research and practice before making a final decision. I wish you the best in your efforts. It can be done. Just try to master each step before leaping
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