Night Vision New 640 12um Thermal Scope offering from Bering Optics (Super Yoter 25mm!)

kirsch

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Bering Optics is soon to release a new option to their Super Yoter line up. The 25mm Super Yoter will be the newest member along with the incredibly popular 35mm and 50mm versions. I have been testing a prototype of this scope for a few months. The scope features are the same and the only difference besides the lens size is the lens cap. With the very generous 18° FOV, Night Goggles believes many people may be buying this for a scanner as well as a scope. Due to this, we are offering it with either the standard Bering QD mount ($3,495) or with the LaRue QD mount ($3,695). You read that correctly, a Bering Optics Super Yoter with a 12µm, 640 resolution sensor, assembled and serviced in the US, with a 4-year transferrable warranty, 8 reticles, 4 reticle and background color options, internal video recording, WiFi, and more for $3,495.

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kirsch

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Super yoter with lrf in the works??
Yes, but can't provide additional detail at this time. In stark contrast to most companies, Bering does not like to announce products and details of those products early. As I get the OK from Bering, I will provide more details.
 
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shoots100

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Nice specs, options and price for a 640 res scope, but when are they going to get away from powering their optics with the limited run time of expensive 123 batteries ?
 
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French1966

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Nice specs, options and price for a 640 res scope, but when are they going to get away from powering their optics with the limited run time of expensive 123 batteries ?
There is a pretty nice affordable adapter for them to run 16650 batteries. It’s $60 last I checked. It always worked great for me.
 

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db2000

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    Bering Optics is soon to release a new option to their Super Yoter line up. The 25mm Super Yoter will be the newest member along with the incredibly popular 35mm and 50mm versions. I have been testing a prototype of this scope for a few months. The scope features are the same and the only difference besides the lens size is the lens cap. With the very generous 18° FOV, Night Goggles believes many people may be buying this for a scanner as well as a scope. Due to this, we are offering it with either the standard Bering QD mount ($3,495) or with the LaRue QD mount ($3,695). You read that correctly, a Bering Optics Super Yoter with a 12µm, 640 resolution sensor, assembled and serviced in the US, with a 4-year transferrable warranty, 8 reticles, 4 reticle and background color options, internal video recording, WiFi, and more for $3,495.

    Product Page


    Any chance of firmware updates for the 50mm Y-C to add internal recording, Wi-Fi or utilize the Bluetooth feature it has in the menu? Thanks
     

    GreenMushroom

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    There is a pretty nice affordable adapter for them to run 16650 batteries. It’s $60 last I checked. It always worked great for me.

    What's your take on the durability of these? I've seen them before but the way they stick out makes me hesitant. If they were to take a hard hit would it just break the adapter or do you think it could damage the scope as well?
     

    shoots100

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    There is a pretty nice affordable adapter for them to run 16650 batteries. It’s $60 last I checked. It always worked great for me.
    Nice for bench shooting or until you try to put it in your rifle scabbard and rip it off, almost breaking the scope.
    Using an external battery is an added expense and using the USB port with the cable adds a spot for moisture to get in and also adds wear to the USB port, causing more issues.
    Most manufacturers gave up on using 123's, maybe someone can pass that along to Bering ?
     

    kirsch

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    Nice specs, options and price for a 640 res scope, but when are they going to get away from powering their optics with the limited run time of expensive 123 batteries ?
    Nice for bench shooting or until you try to put it in your rifle scabbard and rip it off, almost breaking the scope.
    Using an external battery is an added expense and using the USB port with the cable adds a spot for moisture to get in and also adds wear to the USB port, causing more issues.
    Most manufacturers gave up on using 123's, maybe someone can pass that along to Bering ?
    CR123s: Bering is well aware of the dislike by some for CR123s. I anticipate for future models there may be a change.

    16650 Battery Extenders: There are actually 3 options for 16650 battery extenders. Some people love them and others not.

    External Battery Pack: You are correct using an external battery is an added expense but a money saver in the long run. At least the battery pack isn't proprietary. If something happens to the battery pack, there are literally hundreds of options. Also, if something happens to the pack, you haven't damaged the inside of the scope. Yes, it adds weight, a little cost, and a cord. However, with a few LaRue index clips, the cord can be almost a non-factor. Having a cord connected also makes transferring video files super easy and quick.
     

    kirsch

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    What's your take on the durability of these? I've seen them before but the way they stick out makes me hesitant. If they were to take a hard hit would it just break the adapter or do you think it could damage the scope as well?
    There are 3 16650 battery extenders that I am aware of. Apex 3D, 3D Night Vision, and one called the OEM version. The thing to keep in mind is Bering will not warranty any damage that happens to the thermal due to the usage of any internal, rechargeable battery no matter which extender is used. This includes CR123 or 16650. The worry here is over-charged batteries plus adding recoil can be a recipe for serious problems. Batteries that leak, explode, catch on fire, etc are the biggest concerns. I haven't heard of any horror stories with the extenders yet, but this is always a concern, and is a reason Night Goggles does not carry any of the extenders.

    As per your question, 3dNight Vision produced a video of the owner slamming the thing pretty much as hard as he could with his hand to prove how durable it is. I would anticipate the adapter breaking before the scope. I own 2 of the 3 extender options just so I could test them and be able to answer questions our customers may have about them. However, for my actual hunting usage, I use the Night Goggle's TRB external battery. It is the only external battery system Bering has tested and is what Bering uses internally.
     

    kirsch

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    This looks super nice!
    Yes, I believe it will be super popular because it makes an awesome scanner with it generous 18° FOV. With the clear 640, 12µm image it can also handle more digital zoom allowing it to extend to ranges past what a Vibe 25 can for instance.
     

    French1966

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    What's your take on the durability of these? I've seen them before but the way they stick out makes me hesitant. If they were to take a hard hit would it just break the adapter or do you think it could damage the scope as well?
    They seem reasonably durable and attach to the scope using the same basic latch system as the 123 version. The one I’ve been using is made by Bering themselves I’m pretty sure.

    Anything can and will be damaged if hit hard enough. However this item never came off as being fragile, and I was always taking the batteries out after every use. It’s worth every penny of $60.

    I was under the impression that most people that own these optics were already using the battery extension. It was recommended to me by others using it exclusively to power theirs.
     

    kirsch

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    They seem reasonably durable and attach to the scope using the same basic latch system as the 123 version. The one I’ve been using is made by Bering themselves I’m pretty sure.

    Anything can and will be damaged if hit hard enough. However this item never came off as being fragile, and I was always taking the batteries out after every use. It’s worth every penny of $60.

    I was under the impression that most people that own these optics were already using the battery extension. It was recommended to me by others using it exclusively to power theirs.
    Units purchased through certain dealers may have the majority of people using the battery extenders. However, I work in this market, and I do not agree that most people are using them. They absolutely have become more common in the last year. I have taken a lot of heat on several forums on this topic, but I am just relaying what Bering has communicated with me about rechargeable batteries. I just got off the phone with Bering a few minutes ago and asked again about this topic again. The warning is still there but they have seen limited issues with the usage, and it sounds like have eased their caution some. If using rechargeable batteries, I would run a voltage meter on them and make sure they are not supplying excessive voltage.
     

    French1966

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    Units purchased through certain dealers may have the majority of people using the battery extenders. However, I work in this market, and I do not agree that most people are using them. They absolutely have become more common in the last year. I have taken a lot of heat on several forums on this topic, but I am just relaying what Bering has communicated with me about rechargeable batteries. I just got off the phone with Bering a few minutes ago and asked again about this topic again. The warning is still there but they have seen limited issues with the usage, and it sounds like have eased their caution some. If using rechargeable batteries, I would run a voltage meter on them and make sure they are not supplying excessive voltage.
    The issues regarding rechargeable batteries and warranty is no secret. That information has always been in the user manual and clearly stated by Bering. It was an easy way for them to get out of warranty for rechargeable battery issues. Which is odd considering they built in a voltage selector right in to their software via the menu. 3 volt for CR123 & 3.7 volt for rechargeables. I’m sure the idea behind it has to do with really low quality rechargeables and the issues associated with them.

    Buy quality batteries. The Japanese made ones have a pretty good reputation. Metering them would be a good idea, although I never bothered to.

    If anyone is reluctant to use the extensions, I don’t really understand or relate to it. They are commonly used and reliable. To each their own however.
     
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    kirsch

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    The issues regarding rechargeable batteries and warranty is no secret.
    You are 100% correct but for some reason as soon as people buy the OEM extender they seem to think it is no longer a potential issue and only applies to rechargeable CR123s.

    I’m sure the idea behind it has to do with really low quality rechargeables and the issues associated with them.
    This is 100% correct and the main reason for it.

    If anyone is reluctant to use the extensions, I don’t really understand or relate to it. They are commonly used and reliable. To each their own however.
    Yes, it is each to their own as long as people know there is a risk. I personally don't have a lot of worry if putting rechargeable batteries in a $15 light. However, for me personally, I have more concern when putting it in a $4,595 Super Yoter, and potentially running a thermal in temps below zero and then adding recoil to the mix. I have run the extenders when using Bering scopes as scanners because when you remove the recoil element, the risk goes way down. Maybe the biggest concern, even if Bering covers the damage, is the downtime and potential loss of hunting time if you have a battery issue due to rechargeables. We have probably beat this subject to death.

    Now on the bright side of the extenders, for those that sometime struggle with the scope powering off on recoil mainly due to the battery door not sealing tight (2 audible clicks), these extenders can typically help.