Recommendations for a beginner in the sport of precision shooting

senossy

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Sep 26, 2017
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Hello everyone i`m looking to purchase my first bolt action and i`ve heard alot of things about the remingtion 700 series. I know many praise the 700 series but the varmint seems to be the model of choice due to the med heavy barrel, but is there a big difference between the 700 varmint and the standard sps model?

the reason why im asking is that im getting a great deal on a rem 700 sps standard 308 and I wanted to know if its a rifle that could be considered for a beginner in precision shooting.

thanks, senossy.

 

spife7980

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The varmint will have a heavier barrel and generally be more well suited for long strings of shooting. The normal pencil barreled will heat up and begin to wander
 

brianf

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if it truly is a great deal then go for it
most of the SPS shoot ,75-1" @100. take every other penny you want to spend on your gear and go take a course.
take a trained shooter with a 1" rifle vs a "decent shot" with a 1/4" rifle and the trained guy will out shoot him every time. especially at long range.
 

scudzuki

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I had an AAC-SD (Remington 700 20" 10 twist factory barrel) that would shoot the first (cold bore) round with good accuracy then as it heated up from a string of shots it would start slinging them all over the place. Remington 700 barrels are a crap shoot, you might get one that shoots, but you might get one that is a POS.
 

lte82

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  • Mar 12, 2013
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    Bergara BMP in 6.5 creedmoor. Add a pic rail, scope, brake, and bipod and there is literally nothing else you need to compete even at a high level. By the time you get the Remington built into a capable rifle, ie put it in a decent stock, thread the muzzle, etc, you will have spent more and still not have as quality of a rifle. Plus the Bergara will hold it's value better than a Rem or even Tikka.
     

    308pirate

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  • Apr 25, 2017
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    Bergara BMP in 6.5 creedmoor. Add a pic rail, scope, brake, and bipod and there is literally nothing else you need to compete even at a high level. By the time you get the Remington built into a capable rifle, ie put it in a decent stock, thread the muzzle, etc, you will have spent more and still not have as quality of a rifle. Plus the Bergara will hold it's value better than a Rem or even Tikka.

    It's hard to argue against a BMP or HMR as a turnkey option.
     

    briang7511

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    sure you can compete with a rem 700. Knowing what i know now, my vote is if you want to compete just buy a chassis with barreled action from masterpiece arms. After a few matches your only gonna want something better anyway so just go for it now.
     

    jpspeeddemon

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    Sep 3, 2009
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    Hello everyone i`m looking to purchase my first bolt action and i`ve heard alot of things about the remingtion 700 series. I know many praise the 700 series but the varmint seems to be the model of choice due to the med heavy barrel, but is there a big difference between the 700 varmint and the standard sps model?

    the reason why im asking is that im getting a great deal on a rem 700 sps standard 308 and I wanted to know if its a rifle that could be considered for a beginner in precision shooting.

    thanks, senossy.

    Standard profile barrels are not preferred for precision rifle. Also, there are other manufacturers that produce better quality rifles than Remington at the same or even lower price point. Howa, Savage, and Tikka all make heavy barreled precision rifles with better options/features than Remington.

    Also, how much money do you want to spend on your first precision rifle? There quiet a few good options in the $800-$1,200 range.
     

    athanasios23

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    Dec 28, 2009
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    My first rifles were 700's. One I still own and the other one I sold. First custom was built off a 700 which I sold as well. Truly regret selling it. They were all shooters. But remington has fallen off since I purchased those in the early 2000's. If you are getting a smoking deal then buy the rifle. But its hit or miss on whether or not its a shooter. Always ask yourself why your getting a "great deal". Sometimes people are in a jam and sometimes they are just getting rid of their crap. As stated above, what is your budget. If you can afford to spend around $1200 on just the rifle I think you have some good options. Buy a quality scope and get to shooting and I would recommend a shooting class or two.
     

    CJS-6.5

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    First off...you asked a question to the professionals. So expect brand loyalty. I would say that the best beginners precision rifle should be a single shot .22 but basing my answer of of what you didn't say it would be a light recoiling centerfire that you will reload. My reasoning is twofold. One the understanding of the biomechanical working of a rifle and the invaluable intrinsic love afforded by hand loading and two the understanding of the fundamentals of shooting while dealing with some measure of recoil.
     

    CJS-6.5

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    To a true beginner the caliber is not important other than it sets the expectations stage. This will happen when I pull the trigger... The caliber means nothing other than that to someone that can't hit a 5 gallon pail at 100 yards.
     

    CJS-6.5

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    Learn how to shoot before you learn what gun will suit you best. That's the military...
     

    Baron26

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    I would recommend finding a quality local training facility. Typically they have rifles for rent. Spend the money on training and ammo first. As you gain experience, then you will know which rifle is best suited for what you want to do.