Rifle advice for someone starting out

bobsmith781

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Hi All,

I am a beginner looking to get into the world of long range precision shooting (though I have been lurking here for a few months) and am hoping for some advice. First some background: I am interested in a tactical-type rifle, which will ONLY be used for punching paper at a range. I expect to start by shooting 100-300 yards, but hope to eventually move up to 1000. I have managed to convince my wife to let me spend up to $3,000 on a rifle itself (the optics have a separate budget), though I realize that may be more than I need. I don't plan on handloading, and would be using factory match grade ammo. Finally, I have very little rifle experience, but I would plan to do a proper long-range training course soon after getting the equipment.

Anyhow, I have a few specific questions that I am hoping to get some thoughts on:

1) Caliber: I think I have narrowed the caliber down to .308 Win and .300 WM. The .300 would be great for its ability to comfortably go to 1000 (when/if my skills will allow it), but I'm not sure whether the recoil will be too much. I am a pretty big guy (~230lb). Also, if I were to go for .300, any rifle I get would be very heavy...probably 17-20lb with scope. The numbers from a recoil calculator suggest that the recoil energy/velocity of a .300WM in an 18 lb gun would be similar to a .308 in a 11 lb rifle, but I'm not sure if I'm missing something. Note that I want to avoid a muzzle brake for the usual reasons. I have not heard anyone suggest that a .308 in a 11 lb gun would be too much for a beginner, so that would suggest that a .300 in a heavy rifle would be ok for me. On the other hand, a .308 in a very heavy gun could make the recoil very light, which could be good for learning. Since I have never fired either, what do you guys think?

2) Factory/Custom: The next question is whether to go with a factory rifle or a custom build. Either way, I'm probably going to go with an AICS 1.5 for the stock. If I were to go factory, I'd probably just get a Rem SPS 700 Varmint to stick in the AICS. Obviously, this approach would bring me in WAY below my budget.

If I go for a custom build I have lots of choices but was thinking of something like a Surgeon RSR, 26" heavy contour or bull barrel, AICS, Jewell trigger, etc. I think this would be close to or a bit over the $3000 budget.

Anyhow, my question is whether a custom build for a beginner is a waste of money. Will I get any benefit from a custom build, or would I be just as well off learning on the Rem 700? Or would it be better to go with a buy once, cry once approach and spend the money on the custom while I have permission? Finally, am I likely to look like an complete idiot at the range learning on a $3,000 gun?

Thanks so much for the advice, and my apologies if any of the above are stupid questions or if I missed the answers in my search. Also, any other advice outside of the questions above is very welcome!
 

cvuxton

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

I second Thunderbolt's suggestion. Print all three out and read several times. Caliber and glass were th etwo hardest for me.
 

Furtaker_.223

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Looks like you have done your homework...It is a toss up, If the wife is going to let you spend it, what a wife. You can start with a remington action and run with it. Good action but There is better out there, If it was me, now this is me, I like to get a good action, have a good barrel maker build the barrel in the cal. you want, look for the stock you want, trigger, and either put it togther, or if you know of a good,well known gunsmith have him put it toghter for you. Then you have everything you wanted. Now, either way you are going to still have a small bundle in it. When you do get to shooting well out to 1000 yards you have the rifle already. I myself have built one, and purchased one and they shoot great. But I can only shoot out to 300 yards. I have not shot out any farther than that. I have a friend that just bought a savage target action (very good trigger) for 500.00, he is going to have a barrel built and will set him back 500.00, the stock he is going to buy is not a AICS, but will cost 400.00, and scope 800.00.
Good luck with it, Be sure to post some pics of the stick you go with.
 

sandwarrior

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

bobsmith781,

You can read and read and read. And pretty much what that does is add too much information to the untried/untested to make a decision.

Since you have been hanging out here a while you will find some common threads. Things even I have said "there is better out there". But I find they will all do the job.

1. I suggest buying a .308 in Remington or Savage. Winchester has been a good choice for me in the past but don't know the pricing or status. You may have a 3k budget right now but I suggest you do a lot of shooting with the money you save on a rifle and keeping records of how you did. A very good Savage or Rem will run $1k or less. If/when you feel like upgrading you can rebarrel or sell it and use the funds for the new one. Then possibly think about a custom.

2. Work out to 1k and beyond. If you can go with someone who's done this before this will help immensely. A lot of times I have trouble getting guys to hit consistently at 300 let alone six hundred or eight hundered even 1k. You have to know your trajectory very well to start with to get out there. When you start getting out there a ways you will find wind is even bigger. Get out on the range and do some shooting. Or as Lowlight say's "For fuck sakes go shoot!"

3. Once you've gotten a good idea of how the .308 works then you might want to move into a higher BC caliber. 6mm, 6.5mm and 7mm have pretty much the highest BC bullets made (note how I say made, not can be made) then you might want to upgrade. Either buy another rifle in one of the calibers mentioned or <span style="font-weight: bold">Then possibly consider buying a custom</span>. I highly recommend you don't buy a custom to start with.
See #1. I also highly recommend you don't buy a .300 Win Mag to start with. Unless, you already have experience with the recoil generated by these.

 

THUNDERBOLT68

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Okay my .02,
If you do not have the money to get the top of line.....
I would look at the 4-sale section here and buy a great used gun... there are some great deals..and buy a custom or trued correctly remington....
If you still can not afford that. Then I would find any of the Remingtons in the HS- Precision stock, Be it used or new... Then I would take it to a Good Gunsmith.( several on hide ) Have him set back the barrel, Clean chamber up and re crown. Should be no more than 150.00 Then have him bed the action. On the HS stock should not be more than 125.00 - 150.00. You learn and do your own trigger job. Then you Probably have a gun that can learn properly on. Shoot the crap out of it. I would go with a .260 rem if you can find it..308 would work, not my first choice.
This way you have a good foundation to start with. AS time goes on and you want to move toward the custom set-up you can. All you have to do is Blue print Remington ( if done correctly will shoot with the custom actions all day long )Put custom barrel on it. Re stock it. Put new trigger in. Bingo you have a custom tactical long range gun. Over time...


I can not help on scope. I am very narrow minded and it would just start a pissing contest in this thread...
 

pepperbelly

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

You also need to include reloading equipment and components in your budget. If you don't already have a press and dies, scale, all the little tools needed and powder, bullets, brass and primers you will be out a fair amount of money quickly.
If you are serious about shooting you will want to handload. The best commercial ammo out there is designed to function in all rifles, not necessarily be accurate in them. You will need to tailor your ammo for your rifle.
Unless you will be shooting further than 1000 yards I think a .308 will do what you want. It will shoot to 1000 yards. Unless you decide that what you will be doing absolutely requires a .3000WM I don't see it being worth the extra powder- and recoil. I am not an expert but I believe the .308 is easier to load accurately. I believe I have read the .300WM is a little finicky, but I have never had one or loaded for one so I may be full of it.

Jim
 

rrflyer

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

With your budget I'd buy

A remington 5r in .308
Seekins 20 moa base and 30mm rings
A Night force 3.5-15x50 MIL/MLR scope

Thatll all run you about 3,000 bucks brand new.

Then take whatever you have left and buy lots and lots of 175gn Black hills or federagl gold medal match ammo

Then go shoot about 3,000 rounds through it to get started.

Thatll give you a chance to get started with top quality equipment while practicing and trying different things out until you feel exactly what you want.

Now go forth and charge it
 

cavscout1983

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

The only way you could look like an idiot on the range with a $3K rifle is if you do something unsafe or someone offers advice or asks if you want some and you deny yourself the opportunity to learn.

If you have the $ and have the desire to learn and not have it be a fleeting hobby, buy the best within your budget and considering what you want out of the rifle.
 

HillbillyfromAL

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Personally I'd suggest a cheaper rifle and reloading equipment. Unless your getting factory ammo for free. More ammo=More shooting. Just my .02
 

rcnpthfndr

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mdesign

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Bob - I was where you are at 10 years ago and my advice is to save the $3000 until you know what you want...and to spend a some time looking and learning before you buy.

One thing I would do is to look up LR shooters, attend matches and gun builders with in reasonable driving distance from where you live. Ask if you can shoulder their equipment, see what style of stock you like, scope, etc.

Doing this helped me know I did not like certain stock designs or scope reticules. I also realized I did not want a 18# gun as mine had to double as a hunting rifle as well.

There is some very good comments in that articles Thunder linked to your posts some of which are very true but I also find that advice from people in the business (selling guns or training) tends to be more expensive because of the assumption that everyone wants what they want. Not everyone wants to be a serious LR shooter and can do what they want for half the price and be very content. Others want it all and will truly excel at it with the high end equipment.

I'm not sure on the level of your experience or what is motivating you to want to do this but I would definitely recommend going with a 308 or similar sized case (260, 7-08, 243) unless you have shot magnums before and can shoot them well. The sustained recoil of that heavier cartridge makes for poor shooting habits for a lot of people. I also recommend that you consider a smaller cartridge so that your wife can shoot this rifle as well.

Good luck!
 

THUNDERBOLT68

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

IMHO, you can not go wrong with any Remington. ( this will give you the base to build on if you so choose )
 

bobsmith781

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Thanks so much guys for the advice and lots of great info. I have a lot to think about and read. After reading all the comments so far, it certainly seems like the .308 (or smaller) would be the better way to go than a .300. Thanks again!
 

Jthoss0837

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Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

Unless you shoot alot, or have shot for a while, a big bang and a heavy recoil can cause alot of flinch and pull in an unexperienced shooter. .308 is definitely the way to go from my point of view. Remington 700 is a great model and can be used to build on. Optics is where you should spend your money as well.
My personal thoughts.
 

samnev

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    If you have $3000 to spend I'd get a TRG 22 in 308 Win and for a scope a Nightforce 5.5-22X56 NXS or a 8-32 NXS. I started out with Remington PSS. Then desired a more accurate rifle and moved up to the TRG 22.
     

    bm11

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chiller</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Consider a AIAE Mk II </div></div>This is the best option if you want an AI stock and have a $3k budget. This would be a much better choice than a 700 varmint in an AICS, IMO.

    I would definitely also consider a Sako TRG-22 if I was working with your budget. I have shot one, and it is a hell of a gun for they money.

    That being said, make sure your budget includes a huge ammo allowance.

    I would definitely go with a .308, because it will be much more budgetable to shoot than a .300 win mag. Furthermore, if you go with the AE MK2, you can always get a .260 rem barrel to extend your range, with the ability to shoot the available, lower price, lower barrel wear .308 most of the time.
     

    GRIM

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    There are no stupid questions Bob. We all hope to keep folks from making a mistake when purchasing a firearm so keep asking - you'll get a million opinions and all are right/wrong for you.

    1st - find someone on this board close to you and PM them, see if they will meet up with you at a local range and let you test fire their weapon of choice. Do that as many times as you can to test out as many different types of stocks/actions/scopes & reticles. Save your money for now. You're gonna want to do this once, so do it right.

    Are there any rifle matches at your local club? If so, find out when the next one is and go to it. Ask LOTS of questions (that pertain to shooting, not stuff like "What is the circumference of the earth at the equator") and maybe you'll even get to shoot their rigs.
    What about attending a class at Rifles Only or something similar in your part of the country that will loan you a rifle to use. You'll come away with a ton of experience and get to use a loaner that you will find out if you like it or not. Maybe you can ask to use a higher end rifle and pay for the use of it?


    IE - scope: do you like to dial your corrections for elevation/windage so that you can hold dead on with the crosshair or dial only elevation and hold off on the horizontal line for windage or use a reticle tree (ie Zeiss RapidZ-1000). I like to put on an elevation turret that you can mark up with your trajectory drops in yards then dialing is quick and you don't get lost counting clicks then forgetting where you are in the heat of battle. I've also got a Zeiss on my semi-auto .308 for fast target engagement. But I like to shoot steel so that application works for me.

    I'm a big fan of the Remingtons since there are SO many aftermarket parts available for them. Not so with all the other gear out there. One in particular that is upgradable but starts out pretty good is the Rem700 AAC-SD (replace the stock as the factory one is ok but not great, you do the trigger job and then go play).
     

    Dirty D

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Some very good advice here.

    Pick a caliber then pick the bullet for that caliber and then find out what twist rate is best for your chosen caliber/bullet and build a rifle around that. I stumbled across 500 Black Hills Match .308 brass cases for free and want to run the 168's and 175's so I acquired a 10 twist barrel and should be installing it this weekend (my barrel nut wrench came in the mail this week).

    If you don't plan on reloading can I have your spent brass?
     

    mdesign

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    GRIM said:
    .....1st - find someone on this board close to you and PM them, see if they will meet up with you at a local range and let you test fire their weapon of choice. Do that as many times as you can to test out as many different types of stocks/actions/scopes & reticles. Save your money for now. You're gonna want to do this once, so do it right.....
    +1 on the comment about PM other members. There are some very gifted, experienced and humble shooters on this board that will willingly answer questions and share info. Many of them are my personal friends today and helped me become a better shooter when I was starting. One of them even told be about the Hide, said he thought I could learn some things there...
     

    AXEMAN

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    bob, fill out your profile so people close can chime in and help you out. if your close to me, ill let you shoot my savage.

    if i had $3k to start and i was just starting, first i would look around my area and make sure there were places to shoot long range. here i am lucky to get a 300y range. i will have to find further distances on private land.

    then i would ask myself how much shooting do i really plan on doing? to get the most out of any rifle requires practice. if your ony gonna shoot 100 rounds a month, why do it from a $3k rifle when a $700 savage or remington will do just as well? its gonna take alot of practice to get the best from a $3k rig or any rifle really. if your gonna shoot alot and dedicate the time and money it takes to get good, then a $3k rifle makes sense. kinda. but if not, get a good rifle used thats already been trued and has a good barrel thats not shot out. there are some really nice used rifles here. savages as well as 700s and true customs. or buy an off the shelf savage or 700 and put some into reloading equipment and buy a case of good match ammo as a warm up and save the brass to reload. its gonna come down to putting your hands on as many rifles as possible and seeing what you like best, what fits you best and how much time you will dedicate to it.

    but one thing, buy the best glass you can afford. that will stay with you no matter what rifle you buy then trade then sell and buy again. plus if you get tired of it, you will always get almost if not all of your money back if you dont like stick with it

    everybody has an opinion, this one is mine.
     

    bm11

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    On the topic of practice as well, think about investing in training. At the minimum, the Snipers Hide online training is a bargain at $10 a month.

    100 rounds a month doesn't necessarily limit how good you will get though. If you do 1,000 quality dry fires a month and 100 live fires to compliment and validate your dry fire practice, vs 250 live fire practice rounds per month with no dry fire practice, I think that doing 1,000 rounds of dry fire (or more) will end up producing the better shooter. Make sure you get some training though so that you are enforcing the right techniques with your training, otherwise you will just end up hammering in the bad form.
     

    bobsmith781

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Again, thanks all for the great advice. Wanted to specifically respond to a couple suggestions:

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">TRG-22/AE</span>: Thanks for the suggestions of the TRG-22 and AE Mk II. For some reason I hadn't really focused on the high-end factory rifles that much in my search. Looking again, and after reading the articles Thunderbolt posted, they seem like very interesting options. Plus, they would have the benefits of not having to wait months for a smith to do the custom work. From basic googling around I haven't yet been able to find a solid price for an AE MKII, but the impression I get is that it may be a bit over my budget, especially when factoring in bipod/base/rings etc. But at about $2,700 the TRG-22 seems right in the ballpark. I wish the Sako accessories weren't so pricey, though it looks like cheaper non-Sako options are available for most things...

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Factory/Custom</span>: It seems like most folks are against the idea of starting out with a custom and think it would be better to start with a factory rifle like a Rem 700 or Savage. I see that point, as I really don't know enough yet to know what I want, and getting exactly what you want is the true benefit of a custom. I also imagine that without experience I will not know whether custom work has been done well or poorly (unless from one of the builders like GAP, which I think would be well above my budget).

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Budget</span>: One thing I'll note about my budget is that unfortunately I don't think its the kind of thing where I can spend a little of it now on a cheaper rifle and spend the rest later on upgrades incrementally. Because of a bunch of recent occasions (birthday, 10th anniversary, father's day, raise), my wife is giving me a gift of any rifle I want so long as it is less than about $3,000. I believe this is a "use it or lose it" type deal. While I expect to be able to spend on upgrades in the future (maybe around this time next year), that won't be part of this gift. Of course, I still don't want to waste money, since its my money too, but that may help explain why I am willing to spend above my skill level.

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Optics</span>: Optics is still an open question and I'm not yet sure what the budget will allow (the source of funds for that is different...long boring story). Preliminarily thinking along the lines of the NF NXS 3.5-15x50, NF NXS 5.5-22x50, or Leupold MK4 6.5-20x50 FFP. Obviously any other suggestions are welcome, but these seem like solid choices from what I have read.

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Practice/Training:</span> I'm not yet sure exactly what amount of live-fire practice I will be able to do, but I would expect around 100-200 rounds per month, depending on family/work commitments. Regarding training, I have separately budgeted for a long-range training course (one of the 2-3 day varieties), and expect to do that shortly after getting a rifle and doing some basic practice. The Sniper's Hide online training also is a great idea that I plan on doing (particularly given the price).

    Thanks again, and as always, please feel free to let me know your opinion on the above or anything else!
     

    Anchor Zero Six

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    DSC00499.jpg


    http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubbthre...517#Post1934517

    Just saying
    wink.gif
     

    ReaperDriver

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bobsmith781</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Again, thanks all for the great advice. Wanted to specifically respond to a couple suggestions:

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">TRG-22/AE</span>: Thanks for the suggestions of the TRG-22 and AE Mk II. For some reason I hadn't really focused on the high-end factory rifles that much in my search. Looking again, and after reading the articles Thunderbolt posted, they seem like very interesting options. Plus, they would have the benefits of not having to wait months for a smith to do the custom work. From basic googling around I haven't yet been able to find a solid price for an AE MKII, but the impression I get is that it may be a bit over my budget, especially when factoring in bipod/base/rings etc. But at about $2,700 the TRG-22 seems right in the ballpark. I wish the Sako accessories weren't so pricey, though it looks like cheaper non-Sako options are available for most things...

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Factory/Custom</span>: It seems like most folks are against the idea of starting out with a custom and think it would be better to start with a factory rifle like a Rem 700 or Savage. I see that point, as I really don't know enough yet to know what I want, and getting exactly what you want is the true benefit of a custom. I also imagine that without experience I will not know whether custom work has been done well or poorly (unless from one of the builders like GAP, which I think would be well above my budget).

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Budget</span>: One thing I'll note about my budget is that unfortunately I don't think its the kind of thing where I can spend a little of it now on a cheaper rifle and spend the rest later on upgrades incrementally. Because of a bunch of recent occasions (birthday, 10th anniversary, father's day, raise), my wife is giving me a gift of any rifle I want so long as it is less than about $3,000. I believe this is a "use it or lose it" type deal. While I expect to be able to spend on upgrades in the future (maybe around this time next year), that won't be part of this gift. Of course, I still don't want to waste money, since its my money too, but that may help explain why I am willing to spend above my skill level.

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Optics</span>: Optics is still an open question and I'm not yet sure what the budget will allow (the source of funds for that is different...long boring story). Preliminarily thinking along the lines of the NF NXS 3.5-15x50, NF NXS 5.5-22x50, or Leupold MK4 6.5-20x50 FFP. Obviously any other suggestions are welcome, but these seem like solid choices from what I have read.

    <span style="text-decoration: underline">Practice/Training:</span> I'm not yet sure exactly what amount of live-fire practice I will be able to do, but I would expect around 100-200 rounds per month, depending on family/work commitments. Regarding training, I have separately budgeted for a long-range training course (one of the 2-3 day varieties), and expect to do that shortly after getting a rifle and doing some basic practice. The Sniper's Hide online training also is a great idea that I plan on doing (particularly given the price).

    Thanks again, and as always, please feel free to let me know your opinion on the above or anything else!

    </div></div>

    Does the $3K "use it or lose it budget" include the optics? Is so, I would suggest spending the bulk in the optics (NF, USO, S&B, PH) and getting a decent factory rifle like many have suggested. A good quality scope will last a lifetime, whereas you will probably change guns a few times as you figure out what you like and don't like.
     

    bobsmith781

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ReaperDriver</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Does the $3K "use it or lose it budget" include the optics? </div></div>

    Nope. Fortunately, the optics are separate from the $3k. Not sure how much the optics budget is yet, but probably about $1600 or so.
     

    recurry

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Hillbilly makes a great point. You might consider just buying a rifle that shoots great out of the box (like an LTR or PSS) and then get a great scope and a reloading press.
     

    bobsmith781

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: recurry</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You might consider just buying a rifle that shoots great out of the box (like an LTR or PSS) and then get a great scope and a reloading press.</div></div>

    I would certainly be interested in reloading eventually. Unfortunately, its a no go at this time, as my wife (you can tell who wears the pants in this household) is convinced I would blow my hand off or otherwise damage myself, the children and/or the house in the process. Since she's given me 3K to work with I am not inclined to push my luck further
    wink.gif
    . In a few months I may have better luck (particularly once she sees the bills for all the factory match ammo).
     

    ReaperDriver

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bobsmith781</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: ReaperDriver</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Does the $3K "use it or lose it budget" include the optics? </div></div>

    Nope. Fortunately, the optics are separate from the $3k. Not sure how much the optics budget is yet, but probably about $1600 or so. </div></div>

    Haha, what a shitty dilema to be in. Sounds like you just need to call GAP then and let them help you spend your $3K.

    http://www.gaprecision.net/ga-precision-2010-custom-rifles.html
     

    AXEMAN

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    not to beat a dead horse, but if she is gonna let you spend $3k, get the nightforce, and then a nice factory savage in a decent stock or a 700 sps tactical in a so-so stock and your ready to shoot. buying a $3k rifle and not having optics til later isnt logical. but $3k for a nightforce and rifle with rings and base and boom (LOL) your done maybe with a little to spare, and your shooting. plus you tell her that you wont need the whole 1600, but you might need a little less later.

    dont forget bipods, range bags, cleaning kits, dope books and all the other little stuff your gonna need
     

    hgr2

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Rifle advice for someone starting out

    DON'T DO IT!!!!! one thing will lead to another, pretty soon you'll be just like all us other junkies needing another rifle fix.
    Give it up by not taking it up. Now a little BS aside a TRG22 would be a great starting place. I started with an FN SPR, what a great rifle.
     

    GRIM

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    If 3K is your rifle budget then you can get this beauty. if your buying once and done then this is a killer rifle and you will not need to upgrade anything on it.
    http://www.snipershide.com/forum/ubbthre...rue#Post1933421

    Then if $1600 is your scope budget you can get a real nice Leupold, NF 20 MOA base and rings.


    Personally I'd get a PSS or upgraded stock Savage then a Nightforce scope (3.5-15 or 5.5-22) and spend the rest of your money on good gear (Harris swivel bipod with a Pod-Loc, spotting scope, etc...) to support your habit. Oh.... and it will be a habit.
     

    Bryan27

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    If given a $3000 budget for a rifle I'd buy a slightly used rifle out of the for sale section here at the Hide, built by one of the popular builders. You can find them all day long for at or less than you are budgeting and they seem to hold their value very well. With the custom rifles it seems you have two prices: the price it sells for new, and they price it sells for used......the used price stays pretty stable over the functioning life of the gun. Before you buy I'd suggest you either meet up with some members here from your area and shoulder/shoot some of their guns or head to the range and ask some guys if you can shoulder their rifles to get a feel for what you like and don't like before dropping your coin on a $3k rifle. You may love an A5 or you may like an HTG stock more, but it'd be a shame to find out after you'd already spent all that money.
     

    AXEMAN

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    also, there are three or five threads on this going right now, or hell at any given time really. make sure you hit that resource
     

    sandwarrior

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: AXEMAN</div><div class="ubbcode-body">not to beat a dead horse, but if she is gonna let you spend $3k, get the nightforce, and then a nice factory savage in a decent stock or a 700 sps tactical in a so-so stock and your ready to shoot. buying a $3k rifle and not having optics til later isnt logical. but $3k for a nightforce and rifle with rings and base and boom (LOL) your done maybe with a little to spare, and your shooting. plus you tell her that you wont need the whole 1600, but you might need a little less later.

    dont forget bipods, range bags, cleaning kits, dope books and all the other little stuff your gonna need</div></div>

    Excellent post! I didn't realize the $3K was a "use it or lose it" budget. Bury all your old equipment and get the new. The more you justify the more you get.

    Besides if you do it this way you've got a great rifle to learn on and a great scope.

    sorry to hear the missus thinks you'll kill yerself reloading. It's not like it's playing with old dynamite that leaks nitro glycerin. The worst you'll do is blow a primer. Unless you get totally out of hand and overload by a few grains.
     

    THUNDERBOLT68

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Okay if I understand you right.
    YOU HAVE $ 3,000.00 TO SPEND ON RIFLE ONLY.....
    YOUR SCOPE WILL BE ANOTHER FUND.....

    PM me I will show you how you can build a custom gun for this amount.....
     

    Tribe

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    The 5R 308 is a great place to start, it will take you very deep into the rabbit hole.... dump as much as you can into the optics... you will learn very early, to your dismay, if you do not.

    Ammo becomes like crack.... reloading allows you too shoot more, for that same dime you scrounged from under the cushions...
    whistle.gif
     

    THUNDERBOLT68

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    Actually,
    There are some great buys in the rifle section...you can not go wrong with some of them....
     

    stefan73

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    I would not rule out muzzle breaks! I have never shot a rifle as comfortable as my Sako TRG-22 with a break!!

    Now, you might talk to Alex at Euro Optics about a TRG-22 .308 Winchester which has a threaded barrel if you want a break later. The black full length TRG's are cheaper then the Tan 20" versions! I think the full size in black are around $2650-2750 and they are darn good shooters from what I have read. I have the 20" and am still learning it! My scope arrives tomorrow for it Leupold Mark4 ERT 6.5-20X50 TMR Recticle and M5/Mil turrets FFP (you can pick one of those up new for about $1500).
    There are things that you can do to modify and as we put it "improve you position" with the Sako.

    You might be interested in my TRG-22 thread to get some information on the Sako. IMO its worth a look!

    If you want I can PM you some of my data!
     

    recurry

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: bobsmith781</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: recurry</div><div class="ubbcode-body">You might consider just buying a rifle that shoots great out of the box (like an LTR or PSS) and then get a great scope and a reloading press.</div></div>

    I would certainly be interested in reloading eventually. Unfortunately, its a no go at this time, as my wife (you can tell who wears the pants in this household) is convinced I would blow my hand off or otherwise damage myself, the children and/or the house in the process. Since she's given me 3K to work with I am not inclined to push my luck further
    wink.gif
    . In a few months I may have better luck (particularly once she sees the bills for all the factory match ammo).
    </div></div>

    Right on - good luck with finding the right rifle. You can get a lot of gun for $3K, especially from what I've seen for sale on the forums here, so I'm sure no matter what you decided on it'll be a lot of fun to shoot!
     

    BrettSass844

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    Re: Rifle advice for someone starting out

    There was a hell of a deal on a 260 in the for sale section. Made me wish my cash stash was larger! +1 on taking your time and looking into the for sale section daily.