Shooting for my daughter

mdawson

Sergeant
Full Member
Minuteman
Dec 23, 2007
102
0
45
Camilla, Ga
I have a 4 year old and want her if she should show some interest, to learn how to shoot. I can shoot, but have no idea on how to get her started. She asks lots of questions when I have my rifle out and clean it. Any insight would be great.
 

J.Boyette

Gunny Sergeant
Full Member
Minuteman
  • Nov 13, 2003
    1,294
    73
    44
    NC
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I would hold off for 4 more years.

    Then get a 10/22 with a EO-Tech / Aimpoint and make range days FUN and all about her shooting.

    The key is to not make it a trip to the "range school" but to make it a fun day.

    If you go ZERO the red dot sight she only has to point that dot and shoot.

    Get targets that are made of steel and soda cans to go BANG with.
     

    J.Boyette

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Nov 13, 2003
    1,294
    73
    44
    NC
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chiller</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Would be curious why wait until 8? </div></div>

    Honestly, its up to the child. I have found that the level of task saturation is very high no matter the age. But MOST children at 8 or older can keep there mind on the task at hand better.

    Other than that you run in to the real issues of noise, comfort and just over loading the system with whats going on.

    That's just my findings. If you have a private location with little interruptions with other adults I say 6.

    But its up to the child and there ability to focus and enjoy the task.

    John
     

    K.O.A.M.

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jun 9, 2010
    26
    0
    51
    Central Florida
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    One thing that I always do with new shooters is I fill up a milk jug with water and pop it with something sizeable. People (including kids) who are new to firearms sometimes don't understand what they can do. My dad did that with me, and I never forgot it.
     

    Mr_Brass

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Apr 10, 2010
    541
    0
    32
    45x90 WI.
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KOAM</div><div class="ubbcode-body">One thing that I always do with new shooters is I fill up a milk jug with water and pop it with something sizeable. People (including kids) who are new to firearms sometimes don't understand what they can do. My dad did that with me, and I never forgot it. </div></div>

    yup, sadly not many people do that anymore.
     

    Chiller

    Moderator
    Moderator
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Dec 18, 2008
    6,136
    40
    52
    Sole resident of Mt. Crumpit.
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KOAM</div><div class="ubbcode-body">One thing that I always do with new shooters is I fill up a milk jug with water and pop it with something sizeable. People (including kids) who are new to firearms sometimes don't understand what they can do. My dad did that with me, and I never forgot it. </div></div>

    My dad did that very thing 35+ years ago with a 12 ga. I drove the point home.
     

    Chiller

    Moderator
    Moderator
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Dec 18, 2008
    6,136
    40
    52
    Sole resident of Mt. Crumpit.
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: J.Boyette</div><div class="ubbcode-body"><div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Chiller</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Would be curious why wait until 8? </div></div>

    Honestly, its up to the child. I have found that the level of task saturation is very high no matter the age. But MOST children at 8 or older can keep there mind on the task at hand better.

    Other than that you run in to the real issues of noise, comfort and just over loading the system with whats going on.

    That's just my findings. If you have a private location with little interruptions with other adults I say 6.

    But its up to the child and there ability to focus and enjoy the task.

    John </div></div>

    John,

    I am curious to hear what you started your little one with.
     

    trigger time

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Aug 16, 2006
    696
    2
    Anna, tx
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    My son was shooting 22's by 4. He's 8 now and try's to lay claim to every gun I own. He's also one heck of a shot.
    zscricket.jpg
     

    USMC0331

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Nov 29, 2007
    16
    1
    TEXAS
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I started my daughter last year at 4. Mostly safety training and cycle of function on a single shot bolt. She's doing well in these departments but still can't get the iron sites down. I let her shoot my 10/22 w/ red dot and she did very well. I plan on putting a red dot on her rifle soon.
     

    trigger time

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Aug 16, 2006
    696
    2
    Anna, tx
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    We started with iron sights, but followed with scope and red dot shortly after on several different set ups.
     

    cvedrick

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Aug 4, 2009
    170
    0
    54
    League City, Texas
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    It may seem strange, but I have started several newbies of different ages with Air-Soft.

    Generally the first is a pistol, allowing proper grip, stance trigger control and sight picture "front sight" all the while stressing the safety rules while praising their efforts.

    I start at 5' and as they feel ready move out to 10', 15' and 25'

    Then I move them on to pellet guns, then on to real firearms.

    If you do not want to play with one of the cheapies, You can get extremely lifelike weapons for $100 and up. Do not bother yourself with the rifles and electrics that go for under $50 bucks, you will never be satisfied.

    Since I might let mine sit for long periods I tend to go for the spring action weapons.

    I train pistol with a (KWC) S&W 4509 which is capable of 4" groups @ 7yd. or better. (costs $25.00 or so at sporting goods stores and maybee wal-mart)

    for an open tactical event a buddy is hosting I have set myself up as the "sharp shooter" vendor with a JinGong VSR10

    http://www.airsplat.com/Items/AR-JG-VSR10-366.htm

    Which is a so-so copy of a Tokyo Marui VSR10 (Industry standard) Which is modeled off of a 700 REM HBAR

    Here is the one I rally wanted but did not get due to insufficient lead time before the event.

    http://www.redwolfairsoft.com/redwolf/ai...0_G_SPEC_OD.htm


    I have just ordered this one as a "prefer it but was not sure if it would arrive in time" rifle, and was a very close second to the TM but might actually work out better for my needs.

    http://www.gamepod.com/classic-army-m24-socom-civilian-version-p-662.html

    My guy Finally got it in last and ran a pre-ship checkout, told me it was chronographing between 560 and 580FPS with 0.2g ammo.


    Another thought is to get her a crossman 760 with pink furniture, short length of pull, about 2# makes very little noise and you can use it to bullseye squirrels and rats



     

    GreyWolf36

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 21, 2002
    104
    0
    Anderson, SC
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    Started my daughter at 9 with both Ruger 10/22 and MKII on reactive targets and she diplays more rangemanship than alot of the grown men that show up at the local range, she's 14 now and still like to go with me when I do.
     

    jaydoc1

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 28, 2010
    2
    0
    52
    Southern Colorado
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    This is my 6 year-old daughter last weekend. She got her 22 last year. Our range time consists of reciting the rules of firearms safety and then ten shots or so before she starts to lose focus. Then we're done. I take her when she asks me which is just about every week.

    We started off last year with me aiming for her and her just pulling the trigger. Then we progressed to dryfire with her aiming. Twelve months later she has a good sight picture and is safe to shoot at 25 yards with this TackDriver rest. She's not ready to hold it with both hands yet.

    906526647_KwMug-L.jpg



    This is my 5 year-old who we are just starting out. If anything, she's more enthused than her older sister.

    906528252_wkFgV-L.jpg



    For completeness' sake, this is my wife. Yes. She rocks.

    906533555_jeXsX-L.jpg
     

    Jim the Plumber

    Sergeant
    Commercial Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I started my daughter at 5 years of age. 10-22 then right to an AR15 with adjustable stock, muzzle brake, and scope all on the same day. In the 18 years since her first shot, she has shot more firearms than most: 4-50bmg's, M-60 machine gun, M-16's grease guns, Uzi's, 223's, 9mm's, 6.5x47's, 338RUM sporter weight,308's, 12 and 20 ga, and the list goes on and on.
    Starting her at 5 was easy and she took to it like a duck to water. Oh and she is only 5' tall and 98#'s even now.
     

    flatlander

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jun 11, 2003
    156
    22
    52
    Eastern NC
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    My oldest daughter started when she was 4 almost 5 with her pink crickett. My daughter is cross eye dominant(right eye, left hand) so we had to patch the strong eye for a while.
    Started with iron's, didn't work moved to a red dot for her to get the mechanics of sight alignment, body position, safety, and handling of the rifle. Moved to Iron's at 7. I'm finishing her pink tiger strip AR this week.
    Now her favorite is my suppressed Browning buckmark.

    My youngest just loves the noise and feel of the recoil, so she loves it when I let her stand behind the Sterling and do mag dumps.

    Todd
     

    LoneWolfUSMC

    Lt. Colonel
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 9, 2008
    7,386
    13
    Southern Indiana
    www.8541tactical.com
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I started my boy out on his fifth Christmas with a Savage Cub .22LR with iron sights.

    That is still "his" rifle, but he gets some trigger time on my BTVS with optics as well.

    He is a hell of a shot. He loves to come back and put his targets up on the refrigerator for his momma to see.

    Now I started him SHOOTING at five. He was learning about gun safety and handling since he could talk. Every time I brought one of my guns out he was interested in them. So I started showing them to him an telling him how to make sure they weren't loaded. I let him handle them when they were clear and safe. This removed the "mystery" from them. They just became another object in the house like my coffee cups. They didn't do any of the cool stuff his toys did and he knew from experience.

    My two year old loves helping me dry fire and handing me dummy rounds. He will be ready for the range in a coupe years, but nothing I have will fit him right now.

    john_2958.jpg
     

    Elxx

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Nov 23, 2008
    208
    0
    Tucson AZ
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I went to camp (Cub Scouts) with my dad when I was 7ish(I think...). Anyways, they had us learn gun saftey with air rifles. At the end of the day, they said they were pulling out the "big-boy" rifles. They were only .22's but that day was my first exposure to guns and it was great.

    I think the 3 key factors for me was my friends were there(father included), it was fun and everyone kept the event really relaxed.
     

    SmokinAce

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 9, 2010
    621
    0
    AZ
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    <div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: KOAM</div><div class="ubbcode-body">One thing that I always do with new shooters is I fill up a milk jug with water and pop it with something sizeable. People (including kids) who are new to firearms sometimes don't understand what they can do. My dad did that with me, and I never forgot it. </div></div>

    My Dad did that when he first taught me to shoot. Till this day (20+ years later) I can see that image in my mind every time my finger clears the plane of the trigger guard and I get set. He also did a second one filled with sand to show something with more substance in it and how the bullet did the same thing. He used a 357 mag.

    Now he spends his time working with the boyscouts and teaching them to shoot skeet/trap and gun safty. He seems to enjoy the heck out of it but first thing he does at the range every time is put a jug at 25 yrds and hits it with a 12ga slug. The look on the young boys faces (and the parents) is something that shows you they get the point.

    As for where to start only you know your child best. Always start with safty and work slowly from there.
     

    ggmanning

    Bird Dog
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Apr 23, 2010
    1,876
    729
    Rural South
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    Started all my children at roughly 4-5 yrs old. Chipmunk/Cricket single shot with a red dot. No parallax...does not need perfect stock fit to shoot well. I keep a small range off the deck with some spinners and gongs out to 50 yards and we use them for the .22 range. Every one of them 14, 12 and 7 learned the right way to shoot early and now it is all natural. We move on to 10/22's and Mark II pistols at about 7. You will be amazed how soon your 4 yr old will be hitting targets with regularity. The things to do for them are use reactive targets so they can see and "feel" hits, get a gun that fits them and work on the trigger so they can be sucessful. Triggers on youth sized guns really suck and a 7# trigger with an inch of creep does not promote good form or function. Main thing is enjoy them and the shooting.
     

    chris223

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Mar 10, 2009
    566
    1
    49
    chicago
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    Get a pink cricket rifle thats what I got mine she loved it .
    now its a 10/22 thats tricked out
    the older she gets the "cooler" the rifle has to be.

    luckily ive got a hell of a friend who always hooks me up with unique 22s
     

    sjohnny

    Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 14, 2010
    149
    0
    49
    Texas (Near Austin)
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    I started my son shooting a year and a half ago (the day after his 5th birthday). Several months ago my father-in-law bought him a single shot Marlin .22 bolt action. I cut down and refinished the stock so it would actually fit him. He can shoot it much better with the short stock. Last time we went to shoot my 5 year old daughter took her first two shots from her brother's gun. She had a pretty big smile on her face but two was enough for her. I'll probably end up getting her a pink gun (she's into pink stuff so I think that will help keep her interested).

    So far with my son we've just been working on safety and having fun. I've been vaguely describing sight picture to him but am having trouble knowing if he is understanding what I'm saying.

    Do any of y'all have any tips on explaining sight picture to a 6 year old? I can't remember how my dad explained it to me but I was about that age when he did.

    I have a 4x scope and a set of rimfire rings waiting to go on his rifle but I want him to learn the irons first.
     

    mtstcon

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Jan 14, 2003
    65
    0
    WY
    Re: Shooting for my daughter

    So much good advice here. (above)

    My daughter started shooting/plinking with me at age 8 (I think late-her mother didn't). At age 10 she started shooting in the 4H program. At age 12 she was 4H State Small Bore Pistol champion for her age group.

    No matter their age, I feel you need to encourage their interest whether they are shooting or not. If possible always take plinking with you, let them help you reload, etc. I think making it fun, focusing on safety, and getting them a rifle or pistol that fits their stature are the initial main concerns. Start out that way, and they will be a shooting partner for ever.