Movie Theater  The Last Panther 🐱‍👤 Slaughter of the Reich by Wolfgang Faust

steve podleski

Private
Full Member
Minuteman
Nov 26, 2005
205
155

Very interesting Youtube video in the audio book format on a story about a Panther commander trying to breakout of a Soviet encirclement in April 1945. Some good action report on a battle between Panthers and King Tigers with Soviets JS1 tanks. It is a long story, over 4 hrs long but worthwhile listening.
 

sirhrmechanic

Command Sgt. Major
Full Member
Minuteman
Am about 3/4’through this.. it is amazing. Part of me says that there is no way one sergeant saw all that in a few days.

Part of me also says that given the state of things in the last days of the Reich... yeah. This doesn’t surprise me.

It is riveting.

Sirhr
 

gayguns

__________
Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
  • Apr 8, 2018
    1,237
    2,913
    You're right!! --RIVETING.

    The vivid descriptions like... The decapitated red's body rushing forward several meters, still firing his hand gun before crumpling.. F!

    Can 75mm or 88 tank casings be bought?

    For tank reference:

    1622390447158.png
     
    Last edited:

    sirhrmechanic

    Command Sgt. Major
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    I was interested in the descriptions of the effectiveness of the Hetzer. And Faust's description of how they could have made 6 of them for each of the 500 King Tigers that Germany wasted so much money and resources on. HItler's wunder weapons... were a disaster.

    1622420875495.png


    For a great book, Richard Overy's "Why the Allies Won." Examines all kinds of factors.

    Another (can't remember the author) is "First Soldier." About Hitler as military commander. And what a hash he made of things.

    Great audiobook!

    Sirhr
     
    • Like
    Reactions: gayguns

    sirhrmechanic

    Command Sgt. Major
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    • Love
    Reactions: gayguns

    gayguns

    __________
    Supporter
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Apr 8, 2018
    1,237
    2,913

    Yes, but they are spendy!

    Sirhr
    $2,300!!. Well... maybe if it weren't inert. lol
     
    Last edited:

    Vodoun daVinci

    Major Hide Member
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Dec 17, 2017
    1,742
    2,191
    Excellent "movie" or book....I haven't been able to stop listening. Super thanks for the suggestion and the link!

    VooDoo
     

    RGStory

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 31, 2020
    313
    308
    Oklahoma
    Very interesting Youtube video in the audio book format on a story about a Panther commander trying to breakout of a Soviet encirclement in April 1945. Some good action report on a battle between Panthers and King Tigers with Soviets JS1 tanks. It is a long story, over 4 hrs long but worthwhile listening.

    Finished this last night. It is a good fictional memoir. Thank you for sharing. The author certainly did his homework in researching the Halbe.

    Credit goes to the 12th army for the willingness to hold the bridgehead and the ability to do so. I was glad the author captured that aspect.

    Also see the following for personal interviews from American, German and Russian participants. Fast forward to the 42 minute mark for images of the bridge they had to cross.




    For those interested in reading additional first hand accounts of the battle, you can find them in the following:

    "Death Was Our Companion: The Final Days of the Third Reich" by Tony Tissier

    "Slaughter at Halbe: The Destruction of Hitler's 9th Army" by Tony Tissier
     

    RGStory

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 31, 2020
    313
    308
    Oklahoma
    Gen Wenke's chief of staff Colonel Reichhelm, being the Chief of Staff mentioned in that video did a few interviews over the years.

    You can find a him at the 12 minute mark on the below video. Skip to the 37 minute mark for the description of Keitel's meeting with Wenke to deliver the orders to the 12th Army.

    The entire series "Hitler's Warriors" is a good primer on 6 important figures in the German military at the time.

     

    steve podleski

    Private
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Nov 26, 2005
    205
    155
    Finished this last night. It is a good fictional memoir. Thank you for sharing. The author certainly did his homework in researching the Halbe.

    Credit goes to the 12th army for the willingness to hold the bridgehead and the ability to do so. I was glad the author captured that aspect.

    Also see the following for personal interviews from American, German and Russian participants. Fast forward to the 42 minute mark for images of the bridge they had to cross.




    For those interested in reading additional first hand accounts of the battle, you can find them in the following:

    "Death Was Our Companion: The Final Days of the Third Reich" by Tony Tissier

    "Slaughter at Halbe: The Destruction of Hitler's 9th Army" by Tony Tissier
    Am now reading "Slaughter at Halbe: The Destruction of Hitler's 9th Army" by Tony Tissier. The book is a little dry and reads like a battle report by staff officers but it shows both sides of the conflict. What is interesting is the Stalin's distrust of his front commanders, especially Zhukov who was very popular with the Russian people. There are snippets of personal recollections. All in all, the 'fictional' story by the Panther commander in the "Last Panthers" may be a embellished account of someone who may have been a survivor of that rout of the Germans. I think that only the Germans and Russians and Chinese may have experienced that degree of slaughter. The only instance where Americans may have experienced something similar may have been the destruction of an US Army division/regiment/brigade in North Korea when the Chinese first crossed the Yalu river.
     

    RGStory

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 31, 2020
    313
    308
    Oklahoma
    Am now reading "Slaughter at Halbe: The Destruction of Hitler's 9th Army" by Tony Tissier. The book is a little dry and reads like a battle report by staff officers but it shows both sides of the conflict. What is interesting is the Stalin's distrust of his front commanders, especially Zhukov who was very popular with the Russian people. There are snippets of personal recollections. All in all, the 'fictional' story by the Panther commander in the "Last Panthers" may be a embellished account of someone who may have been a survivor of that rout of the Germans. I think that only the Germans and Russians and Chinese may have experienced that degree of slaughter. The only instance where Americans may have experienced something similar may have been the destruction of an US Army division/regiment/brigade in North Korea when the Chinese first crossed the Yalu river.

    A couple of days ago, David Dushman, the last surviving Soviet soldier involved in the liberation of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz died. At the time the war ended he was one of 69 soldiers that survived from an initial division strength of 12,000. I could not find a comparable example within the annuals of 20th century American military experience. Even the Philippine Divisions saw more survivors after the war.

    Regarding good historians writing hard to read books, I absolutely agree. I have always lamented that the problem with historians is that their writing style is dry and uninteresting to the uninitiated. Their focus is to be informative and written in a style that can be easily verified and the research continued if necessary. There are exceptions of course.

    So what's next on the reading list?
    Russian Airborne Operations?
     

    pmclaine

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Nov 6, 2011
    24,234
    38,551
    53
    MA
    A couple of days ago, David Dushman, the last surviving Soviet soldier involved in the liberation of the Nazi death camp at Auschwitz died. At the time the war ended he was one of 69 soldiers that survived from an initial division strength of 12,000. I could not find a comparable example within the annuals of 20th century American military experience. Even the Philippine Divisions saw more survivors after the war.

    Regarding good historians writing hard to read books, I absolutely agree. I have always lamented that the problem with historians is that their writing style is dry and uninteresting to the uninitiated. Their focus is to be informative and written in a style that can be easily verified and the research continued if necessary. There are exceptions of course.

    So what's next on the reading list?
    Russian Airborne Operations?

    Russians were MFers......typical commies with no concern for human life. A good number of those 12,000 dead were certainly attributed to the Nazis but neglect and kommisars likely also took a bunch. Mr Dushman wins the "Darwin you Deserve to Procreate" award.

    Sovs were MFers in general they held back at Aushwitz and warsaw to allow the Germans to put down any resistance that might than resist the Russians.

    Laughed at the part in one of those films where Americans with arty stood by and watched Germans shell Russians as they held their bridgehead to allow more Germans to cross the bridge west.....little bit of Karma.

    Patton was right.
     

    RGStory

    Sergeant of the Hide
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Dec 31, 2020
    313
    308
    Oklahoma
    Russians were MFers......typical commies with no concern for human life. A good number of those 12,000 dead were certainly attributed to the Nazis but neglect and kommisars likely also took a bunch. Mr Dushman wins the "Darwin you Deserve to Procreate" award.

    Sovs were MFers in general they held back at Aushwitz and warsaw to allow the Germans to put down any resistance that might than resist the Russians.

    Laughed at the part in one of those films where Americans with arty stood by and watched Germans shell Russians as they held their bridgehead to allow more Germans to cross the bridge west.....little bit of Karma.

    Patton was right.

    It was an oddity of modern warfare introduced during the 20th century that it became common for more combatants to die in direct combat actions rather than from deprivations outside of combat. The Soviets never did seem to catch up to everyone else on the subject.

    I would like to see the statistics on Russian attrition rates of frontline units from activities other than combat. Unfortunately, the Soviets were extremely guarded about that material.