The Woodchuck and Firewood Hoarders Thread

346ci

Sergeant
Belligerents
Mar 26, 2010
1,136
117
169
NC
My 20" and 28" are the Stihl ES lights, they are like replacing your steel barrel with a carbon fiber Proof.

I have used the Oregon reduced weights and have read the Sugi's are nice.
 
  • Like
Reactions: timesublime

LeftyJason

Thumbnail-les
Belligerents
Mar 8, 2017
1,339
1,952
219
33
Kaysville Utah
Some pics from yesterday
20200908091039_IMG_1103.JPG20200908091041_IMG_1104.JPG20200908091043_IMG_1105.JPG
Ground before cleanup. All blown in.

Me in the tree cleaning up the stub. 20200908165807_IMG_1113.JPG

Climbing down the much easier way. Yes I know no eyes or ears. Went up with just hand saws and didn't want to lose my prescription glasses. Neighbors saw I was up the tree and offered the chainsaw. I had my 550 cord with me. 20200908165903_IMG_1118.JPG

Wife took some others but she didn't notice the auto focus was off.

Part of what I cut out of the tree. 4x4 post for scale.
20200909_083336.jpg

Pile out the front. Best part was I didn't have to carry any of it.
20200909082059_IMG_1122.JPG
 

Alpine 338

Lumberjack
Belligerents
Jun 26, 2010
1,590
653
219
NW Colorado
I prefer the Stihl ES bars with wide nose, 13-tooth sprocket. Unfortunately, Stihl doesn't think we can be trusted with such things anymore, and is only importing the narrow nose bars now. I run 20" bars on everything, except the 024 and 261 are 16", and the 660 has a 25". I'm cutting above 8000-ft elevation, and need all the HP advantage I can get. The new saws lack the torque of the older saws. My only new saws are the newly acquired 261, and a 362 I've had for a few years now. Even though they have improved the air box filtration, they have taken a step back in torque, and the nagging problem of fuel tank over-pressurization, where the saw suddenly stops, and you have to open the fuel cap to release the pressure to get it to start again. I understand this is a common problem with all new Stihls?
 

jeepguy88

Private
Minuteman
May 26, 2020
11
10
6
Just found this thread.
Cutting firewood is more fun than shooting sometimes lol.
Was going to go out this week, woods are closed for fires now.
Lots of people getting evacuated around here.
Loading the truck with preperations in case we evac, I was like I wonder how many other people load a 660 first, before food and water lol.
Anyway here's a pic from a few weeks ago . IMG_20200909_214217_01.jpg
That old growth fir is like gold around here 😀
 
Last edited:

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
Just found this thread.
Cutting firewood is more fun than shooting sometimes lol.
Was going to go out this week, woods are closed for fires now.
Lots of people getting evacuated around here.
Loading the truck with preperations in case we evac, I was like I wonder how many other people load a 660 first, before food and water lol.
Anyway here's a pic from a few weeks ago . View attachment 7420448
That old growth for is like gold around here 😀
Holy shit! How in the heck do you process a round that size? Better yet, how do you get a round that size out of the timber? Heavy lift helicopter? 660 or 880?
 
  • Like
Reactions: oneshot86

jeepguy88

Private
Minuteman
May 26, 2020
11
10
6
Holy shit! How in the heck do you process a round that size? Better yet, how do you get a round that size out of the timber? Heavy lift helicopter? 660 or 880?
I have a 660 with a big bore kit, 98.5cc. 🥰Chop at it one swing at a time lol jk. Its dried so splits easy peazy. It was raining that day, but the log is still dry. And the pic was taken from the road, didn't have to rent the helicopter that day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tnichols

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
Three days now of lows in the 40’s and highs in the low 50’s and nonstop rain. Prior to this, we went 27 days without rain and the AC running nonstop 🤷🏼‍♂️. Iowa. House was down to 63 👍🏻, but Miss Lori was chilly 🙄. Spent some time this afternoon to properly clean the stove, flue, and cap. Knocked the chill off tonight with splitter scraps.
97E68D13-59AD-418D-98A9-836C3F7DD5D5.jpeg
 

powdahound76

Old tired dad
Belligerents
Sep 7, 2011
5,308
11,749
219
Denver CO
I prefer the Stihl ES bars with wide nose, 13-tooth sprocket. Unfortunately, Stihl doesn't think we can be trusted with such things anymore, and is only importing the narrow nose bars now. I run 20" bars on everything, except the 024 and 261 are 16", and the 660 has a 25". I'm cutting above 8000-ft elevation, and need all the HP advantage I can get. The new saws lack the torque of the older saws. My only new saws are the newly acquired 261, and a 362 I've had for a few years now. Even though they have improved the air box filtration, they have taken a step back in torque, and the nagging problem of fuel tank over-pressurization, where the saw suddenly stops, and you have to open the fuel cap to release the pressure to get it to start again. I understand this is a common problem with all new Stihls?
I think it is an issue with the new Huskies too.
was running a buddies recently and ran into trouble like that.
sure as hell didnt impress me.

Im due a new saw. My brother jacked my old one.

think I am going to look for an older Stihl.
 

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
I think it is an issue with the new Huskies too.
was running a buddies recently and ran into trouble like that.
sure as hell didnt impress me.

Im due a new saw. My brother jacked my old one.

think I am going to look for an older Stihl.
I’ve not experienced the latter problem. Nor have I heard of it. However, I’m at 850’ MSL. Wonder if it’s an altitude issue/problem. Good question to pose on arboristsite.com
 
  • Like
Reactions: oneshot86

oneshot86

Full Member
Belligerents
Jul 13, 2001
7,066
5,348
219
citrus park ,fl
Not sure who you're asking, but here's my .02. I'm still running all Stihl bars. That will change in the future for the bigger saws as I'm not getting any younger. For the 25" plus bars I believe I'll try a Sugi and see how I get along.
i also run sthil bars, but i may get a lightweight for the 461 w a 32 incher
 
  • Like
Reactions: tnichols

powdahound76

Old tired dad
Belligerents
Sep 7, 2011
5,308
11,749
219
Denver CO
Well, Im also not sure what routine cleaning/maintenance he does.

I would guess solid as he takes good care of his tools it seems.

seems silly to drop $600 on a saw and not take good care.
 

BullGear

Private
Belligerents
Nov 29, 2017
1,553
3,722
119
Hazzard County
Three days now of lows in the 40’s and highs in the low 50’s and nonstop rain. Prior to this, we went 27 days without rain and the AC running nonstop 🤷🏼‍♂️. Iowa. House was down to 63 👍🏻, but Miss Lori was chilly 🙄. Spent some time this afternoon to properly clean the stove, flue, and cap. Knocked the chill off tonight with splitter scraps.
View attachment 7421063

Is this early for your area or is this normal?
 

Mr. Zick

Quando Omni Flunkus Moritati
Belligerents
Feb 20, 2017
1,102
1,792
219
32
Wisconsin
I’ve not experienced the latter problem. Nor have I heard of it. However, I’m at 850’ MSL. Wonder if it’s an altitude issue/problem. Good question to pose on arboristsite.com
I’m at ~900’ and if I run wide open dogging into oak they snuff themselves out 3/4 way through the tank or so. Just crack the cap now and again. That’s Husky 550xp and Stihl 461, and 660. Everything is stock and I do abuse them a bit.🤷‍♂️

That’s only when I’m bucking huge stacks of logs and don’t give them any chance to breathe.
 

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
I’m at ~900’ and if I run wide open dogging into oak they snuff themselves out 3/4 way through the tank or so. Just crack the cap now and again. That’s Husky 550xp and Stihl 461, and 660. Everything is stock and I do abuse them a bit.🤷‍♂️

That’s only when I’m bucking huge stacks of logs and don’t give them any chance to breathe.
Interesting. Again, I’ve not had this problem, but, there’s a first time for everything. Never say never.
I could see if you were bucking big stuff where you’re coming out the bottom of a 30 DBA Oak and moving 16” over and letting it eat again, where the tank may not have time to vent. The 70-90cc class saws in that environment are slurping fuel like crazy.
Which begs the question, are the guys running 90cc class saws on an Alaskan Mill experiencing the same problem 🤔? That’s full throttle 24/7
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mr. Zick

LeftyJason

Thumbnail-les
Belligerents
Mar 8, 2017
1,339
1,952
219
33
Kaysville Utah
Dad sent me this video.

"Best video I have seen showing a tall tree removal process including details of top guy work. 2 videos. I enjoy the top guy work. I have spent as long as 6 hrs in a continuous stretch up a tree like this to cut it down. 2nd video shows the ride the top guy gets when a section is dropped." - my dad
I was my dad's ground crew for that.

Awesome to see the tree work.
 

Ankeny

Private
Belligerents
Aug 11, 2009
280
303
69
65
I need to get better at judging the height of trees. I have been cutting standing dead lodge pole pine. This morning I eyeballed a blow over on the edge of the stand that I am cutting. The tree didn't make it far when it blew over before hanging up in live trees. It couldn't have been more than a 15 degree lean. About eight feet up the tree was a little stub of an old branch. So, I figured I could tie around the tree above the branch, hook onto my truck, and pull the tree back and over. I carry a 100 foot piece of 5/8 static kernmantle rope just for pulling on trees. The rope was neatly coiled in a rope bag, but I had a 25' long 3/8" log chain, and two 30 foot heavy duty tow straps in the bed of the truck. The tree was only 26 inches a foot above ground level, and I am tied on eight feet high. There is no way in hell this tree is anywhere near 90 feet tall.

I hooked everything up and put the truck in four wheel drive low and started backing up taking all of the tension out of the line, then I gassed it just a bit. Just as planned, the tree went to vertical, then started falling in a perfect line, so I tugged a little bit more. As the tree started falling, I remember saying to myself, "Oh fuck, oh fuck..." .

The tree crashed down raining small branches all over my pick up truck. The very top of the tree was about 18 inches from my front bumper. Upon further examination, the bottom of the tree was about 8-10 feet from where it was originally uprooted. Now I know why one shouldn't go yanking on trees with elastic straps/ropes.
tree.jpg
 

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
I need to get better at judging the height of trees. I have been cutting standing dead lodge pole pine. This morning I eyeballed a blow over on the edge of the stand that I am cutting. The tree didn't make it far when it blew over before hanging up in live trees. It couldn't have been more than a 15 degree lean. About eight feet up the tree was a little stub of an old branch. So, I figured I could tie around the tree above the branch, hook onto my truck, and pull the tree back and over. I carry a 100 foot piece of 5/8 static kernmantle rope just for pulling on trees. The rope was neatly coiled in a rope bag, but I had a 25' long 3/8" log chain, and two 30 foot heavy duty tow straps in the bed of the truck. The tree was only 26 inches a foot above ground level, and I am tied on eight feet high. There is no way in hell this tree is anywhere near 90 feet tall.

I hooked everything up and put the truck in four wheel drive low and started backing up taking all of the tension out of the line, then I gassed it just a bit. Just as planned, the tree went to vertical, then started falling in a perfect line, so I tugged a little bit more. As the tree started falling, I remember saying to myself, "Oh fuck, oh fuck..." .

The tree crashed down raining small branches all over my pick up truck. The very top of the tree was about 18 inches from my front bumper. Upon further examination, the bottom of the tree was about 8-10 feet from where it was originally uprooted. Now I know why one shouldn't go yanking on trees with elastic straps/ropes.
View attachment 7426185
Grab a stick (or make one) the length of your arm. Hold your arm out straight with said stick in your fist vertical. Back up eyeballing the top of the stick until it meets the top of the tree. That is where the tree will land (+/- a couple of feet). You basically just completed the third side of a right triangle. Geometry doesn’t lie. You will be typically long using this method because we don’t fell from the stump base, and fudge factor on the long side is a good thing.
 

tnichols

Sergeant
Belligerents
Jan 23, 2010
3,882
6,963
219
56
Morley IA
Spent the better part of the day at Lori’s folks. Phase 2 of storm clean up. Clearing hung up limbs from salvageable trees. American Linden (Basswood). Nice shade trees but useless firewood. Extremely low BTU rating. Spent the majority of the day on a ladder with my 192 top handle. Pulled out 3 loads of limbs/brush from just this one tree. The video pic is a screenshot as I’m not quite sure how to load them. Be safe fellas.
E78222A0-A53C-440A-98FB-D9ECB40704F6.pngA1F8ACA9-3C32-42B2-9309-8C6F8D323607.jpeg