Gewehr 98 action

sandwarrior

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So I have several ponds of h1000, do any of the previously discussed cartridges work well with it?
That is typically a magnum powder. However, high volume small diameter cases can use it, i.e. .243 and 6mm Rem. It's only going to really work in those cases with heavy bullets. With a tight twisted 6mm barrel pushing 100+ gr. high BC bullets it will work.

.257 Roberts and 25-06 will benefit only in the 117-120 class bullets.
 
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Jerry m

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.220 Swift with 70 grain bullet; 6 mm Remington with several etc...

Good Luck

Jerry
 

epoletna

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I've owned, restored, bought, or otherwise acquired about a dozen Mausers, from military to Oberndorf, from German made to those made in other European countries. I'm a sucker for a smooth Mauser action, and love Oberndorfs. Jon Speed is a close personal friend (if you look in the introduction to his first Mauser book you'll see he mentions me by name) and he and I have been on Mauser buying sprees in Africa.

All that said, I agree with others who have said that unless this has some big sentimental value, you're better off using a modern commercial action like a Howa or Remington. I've sporterized Mauser actions for 6.5 mm, 7mm, and bigger calibers, and I've put a lot of money into them and ultimately been disappointed in them. A Remington 700 action makes a good rifle, very likely a better shooter than a Mauser -- and it pains me to say that.

If you really want to do this, by all means get a hardness test on it. You might learn that it will not be a good modern sporter. If it passes that, take note what people have said above -- you will have feed problems with steep-walled cartridges like the Creedmoors. Longer tapers with shallower shoulders, like .308 or 7X57 will work fine. You will probably find the action will not accept a .30-06 cartridge comfortably. You might need to alter the magazine and feed ramp, and these are costly modifications.

You will need something like a Canjar trigger -- that's another expense -- a blue or cerrokote finish, and new bottom metal. Then you'll need a stock. Etc., etc., etc. As you can see, it just keeps adding up. Don't forget drilling and tapping the action for a scope base.

Someone above said you could plan to spend $6,000 or more. That is more than you really need to spend, but you're probably looking at $2,000 at least. For that kind of money you could have a nice hunting rifle built on a Remington, Winchester or Howa action.

I hope this all makes sense. I don't want to discourage you. Like I say, I love Mausers dearly. But you are not saving money by using this action to build a custom rifle. Trust me -- I've been there and I've been disappointed time and again.
 

sandwarrior

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One of the things I get really frustrated with is the negative attitude toward Mausers as a modern firearm. Yes, you may spend a lot of money on them customizing them. Then again, you may not, and still come out with a pretty nice rifle. Unless there is something special about a rifle, you won't usually get out of them what you put into them. Cost of aftermarket parts goes the same. You can get good aftermarket triggers for less than a Canjar.

First, get a good gunsmith. The OP has that in Jim Kobe. For all the basic things that need to be done to a Mauser, he is not that expensive. And, yes, trued properly, Mausers can be a basis for very accurate firearms. That's also dependent on how you set the rifle up otherwise as well.
You also need to understand you can't load it to the moon. And neither can you load a Win, Howa, or a Remmy like that either. Sticky bolt-lift and ruined brass are hallmarks of what I see "hot-loaders" doing all the time. Burning out barrels 'cause "the rifle just won't shoot if I don't load it to the max". Not true. And it's not true with any other brand of rifles either. Stay within the limits of the cartridge you load it for and it will give you plenty of satisfaction.

The last thing I'll say in this post is pretty much NOTHING gives you your money back out of it when you customize any rifle. You can spend all kinds of money on anything and it's just not going to happen. UNLESS, as stated previously, you get a guild builder (Jim Kobe is) to do the rifle for you and it will hold it's value.
 
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Forgetful Coyote

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One of the things I get really frustrated with is the negative attitude toward Mausers as a modern firearm. Yes, you may spend a lot of money on them customizing them. Then again, you may not, and still come out with a pretty nice rifle. Unless there is something special about a rifle, you won't usually get out of them what you put into them. Cost of aftermarket parts goes the same. You can get good aftermarket triggers for less than a Canjar.

First, get a good gunsmith. The OP has that in Jim Kobe. For all the basic things that need to be done to a Mauser, he is not that expensive. And, yes, trued properly, Mausers can be a basis for very accurate firearms. That's also dependent on how you set the rifle up otherwise as well.
You also need to understand you can't load it to the moon. And neither can you load a Win, Howa, or a Remmy like that either. Sticky bolt-lift and ruined brass are hallmarks of what I see "hot-loaders" doing all the time. Burning out barrels 'cause "the rifle just won't shoot if I don't load it to the max". Not true. And it's not true with any other brand of rifles either. Stay within the limits of the cartridge you load it for and it will give you plenty of satisfaction.

The last thing I'll say in this post is pretty much NOTHING gives you your money back out of it when you customize any rifle. You can spend all kinds of money on anything and it's just not going to happen. UNLESS, as stated previously, you get a guild builder (Jim Kobe is) to do the rifle for you and it will hold it's value.
Agreed 100%. Mausers are awesome. To hell with another cookie cutter R700..

I know its a 1903 not a Mauser, but still, you just dont get beauty like this with a Remington or Howa.. and with proper bedding, truing, and a big truck axle Douglas barrel, I dare say it'll shoot up to snuff as well..
 

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sirhrmechanic

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Mausers have traditionally been (and still are) some of the finest actions for custom rifles ever.

The Argentine Mauser is legendary.

Anyone today poo-pooing Mauser actions for custom guns is, simply, ignorant.

The challenge with Mausers is not their design or original configuration. It's that it is a very expensive action to work on as a custom. And fewer 'smiths are schooled in them. And those who are command a premium, as, frankly, they should. Because to do a Mauser right, you have to be machinist, toolmaker, craftsman and... artist. Otherwise, you end up with $200 garbage gun.

But the Mauser is probably the finest raw material out there. But don't expect to find people to work on them for "Puttin' scopes on the AR" rates.

Cheers,

Sirhr