Military Jeopardy

sandwarrior

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Don’t make me look up Sua Sponte! Dick Couch’s book is remarkable!

Sirhr
I guess that's kinda unfair. RIP no longer exists. 4-weeks, basic selection of whether or not you should go into the Rangers somewhere. Rasp1 is for junior Rangers (NCO and below, not Ranger qualified) It is 8 weeks and after the "harassment" phase, covers a lot of high-intensity stuff. Live fires/demo the last two weeks.

Anyhow, I presume your question refers to graduation from the French Foreign Legion Training.
 
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sandwarrior

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So, I have an actual question for the jeopardy crowd: I'm having a helluva time trying to nail down what bayonet this is:
1593365970846.png

What used to be the handle is wood. I'm waiting for a measurement from the owner. The frog is leather, not sure if the sheath is too.
 

sandwarrior

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Jap Arisaka had one of those turned quillions
So far it has not matched up with any of the Japanese bayonets. The quillon has no ball and the pommel (rear attach point) is too long. Also, the blade is even like a stilletto, not a sword with blade (Do'h!) sharpened edge on one side and spine on the other.
 
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IrishWind

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View attachment 7311952

Not to change the direction of the thread but I thought this might be of interest to some. A B-17 crashed near here in 1944 while on a training flight and here is some of the stuff I picked up at the site. It was carrying a full load of fuel so most is chunks of melted aluminum. There are 8 more crash sites ( 2- B24, 2 - B17, 1- B26, 2 -F 86D, 1 - C39 ) within 15 miles of here so I have more to do during our time of "social distancing".
I was stationed at an RAF base in England. I have a painting om the wall of a damaged B-17 coming home to the base we worked in. And the artist includes some of the shrapnel the local farmers recover in their labor in the matting.
 
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sirhrmechanic

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So, I have an actual question for the jeopardy crowd: I'm having a helluva time trying to nail down what bayonet this is:
View attachment 7361528

What used to be the handle is wood. I'm waiting for a measurement from the owner. The frog is leather, not sure if the sheath is too.
Late Japanese Arisaka had no ball. The oblong ‘pin’ at the bottom is the dead giveaway. Badly rusted... enough to change blade shape.

Unless it has a cool provenance, it’s not worth much. And by cool provenance, it needs to have a photo of some Japanese General doing Hara Kiri with it. Otherwise... not valuable, even though very cool!

Sirhr

Sirhr
 

sandwarrior

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Late Japanese Arisaka had no ball. The oblong ‘pin’ at the bottom is the dead giveaway. Badly rusted... enough to change blade shape.

Unless it has a cool provenance, it’s not worth much. And by cool provenance, it needs to have a photo of some Japanese General doing Hara Kiri with it. Otherwise... not valuable, even though very cool!

Sirhr

Sirhr
Not sure still. The blade is pretty rusted, but it has no blood groove. The construction is thick in the middle and tapered out to both edges.

I agree, it ain’t worth much. And, to my knowledge has no provenance. Interesting curio at best, IMO.
 

jrassy

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Can some one post a picture of a period correct CIB for the Army Korean War, I have all my Dads ribbons but that one never was given to me. He was in the 24th Infantry Division, as a FO. Thanks in advance and apologies for hijacking the thread🎯
 

sandwarrior

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Can some one post a picture of a period correct CIB for the Army Korean War, I have all my Dads ribbons but that one never was given to me. He was in the 24th Infantry Division, as a FO. Thanks in advance and apologies for hijacking the thread🎯
1593438363673.png

They used a little darker blue (more Navy).

This is what's worn today:
1593438456228.png
 

Foul Mike

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I think that the CIB for most "Grunts" is the most prestigious award they earn and they hold them very close to their hearts.
I got an "issue" one but the one my Battalion Commander, O-6, pinned on me came from his pocket and he said and I can remember it word for word was, "Here Foul Mike, you earned this, take care of it, it is not a trinket."
It is Sterling Silver and has a long pin on the backside instead of the little stabby things with retainers that they "pin" you with. It stays in place when you put it on.
I think, but do not know, that it came from some Jeweler and the quality is very high and it is a bit heavy.
It, and the Orders for it, are the most Precious things I have from my tour over there.

In short,---I have my "issue" one, and the one I received from my CO and the quality between them is easily noticeable so I don't think there is a really good answer to the question.

When my Uncle who was in WW2 was passing on, he handed his CIB to my Aunt and told her, "This is for Mike, he is the only other Infantry man in our family." told me a lot.

I don't know what else to tell you other than mine will probably end up in a shadow box with one of my kids and I am damn glad they don't have one of their own to hand down. FM RIP Fast Flanker 6
 
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pmclaine

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I think that the CIB for most "Grunts" is the most prestigious award they earn and they hold them very close to their hearts.
I got an "issue" one but the one my Battalion Commander, O-6, pinned on me came from his pocket and he said and I can remember it word for word was, "Here Foul Mike, you earned this, take care of it, it is not a trinket."
It is Sterling Silver and has a long pin on the backside instead of the little stabby things with retainers that they "pin" you with. It stays in place when you put it on.
I think, but do not know, that it came from some Jeweler and the quality is very high and it is a bit heavy.
It, and the Orders for it, are the most Precious things I have from my tour over there.

In short,---I have my "issue" one, and the one I received from my CO and the quality between them is easily noticeable so I don't think there is a really good answer to the question.

When my Uncle who was in WW2 was passing on, he handed his CIB to my Aunt and told her, "This is for Mike, he is the only other Infantry man in our family." told me a lot.

I don't know what else to tell you other than mine will probably end up in a shadow box with one of my kids and I am damn glad they don't have one of their own to hand down. FM

For the USMC it's a Combat Action Ribbon.

Looking at the rack I generally look for that first than look in the first row to see what ribbons are there.
 
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bigdaddydmd

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Can some one post a picture of a period correct CIB for the Army Korean War, I have all my Dads ribbons but that one never was given to me. He was in the 24th Infantry Division, as a FO. Thanks in advance and apologies for hijacking the thread🎯
You may want to check his DD214 to make sure he was awarded a CIB. I am ignorant on how they were awarded in Korea, but in current conflicts you had to be an 11 series qualified holding a 11 series on a UMR and been in combat action to receive the CIB. I had some damn good FO's in my platoon but they were not awarded CIBs because they were 12 series and were instead awarded the CAB (combat action badge) .

Like Foul Mike said the CIB is the only award I really give a shit about besides my blue cord and jump wings. I could care less for all the pretty colored ribbons that you accumulate in 24+ years of service.
 
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Huskydriver

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You may want to check his DD214 to make sure he was awarded a CIB. I am ignorant on how they were awarded in Korea, but in current conflicts you had to be an 11 series qualified holding a 11 series on a UMR and been in combat action to receive the CIB. I had some damn good FO's in my platoon but they were not awarded CIBs because they were 12 series and were instead awarded the CAB (combat action badge) .

Like Foul Mike said the CIB is the only award I really give a shit about besides my blue cord and jump wings. I could care less for all the pretty colored ribbons that you accumulate in 24+ years of service.
I used to think a cib,cmb,cab were cool.......

Until I realised basically everyone got one wether they were in the shit or not lol. I dunno how it was before oef oif but they are a participation award for most people now.

I was in a line platoon. Only platoon to see action in our battalion first 4 months of the tour. Battalion had us head to the big fob one day to ressuply and all these pogs at the fob had been given orders for their badges because one single rocket hit "near" the fob...

In the meantime we were eating indirect fire on the reg at our outpost up river and playing dismounted/mounted ied chicken with the talib bois along with our personal favorite, who can expend the most mg ammo in the shortest amount of time across the village square on Fridays. We were doing a great job making sure nobody on our side died while we remodeled the local house we took over unsure of exactly WTF command was trying to have us accomplish but the breezeway and reading nook that housed one of the crewserves was quiet lovely in the early morning late evening after construction was done. Gorgeous views but I digress....

When the big col finally paid us a trip out to see how we dirty boys were living and gave us our cabs, he gave us some words of wisdom about ranger school when he went through in 83' along with a reminder to shave and keep those damn sleeves rolled down and our boots bloused or else...I just tossed that shit in the bottom of a duffle like....gee thanks sport but did you guys bring us some ripit's to restock the caffeine supply cuz I don't mind not having food on the reg but it's going to be a bruhaha if your psd detail try to drink our stash homie it's all we have
 
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Son of Dorn

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Not sure still. The blade is pretty rusted, but it has no blood groove. The construction is thick in the middle and tapered out to both edges.

I agree, it ain’t worth much. And, to my knowledge has no provenance. Interesting curio at best, IMO.
I don't think it's Japanese. Pommel doesn't seem to match up, and the oblong piece in the pommel is no guarantee of Japanese origin anyway. Almost looks like some of the Mannlicher bayonets but the pommel's a bit too flat for the ones I've seen.
 
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Son of Dorn

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@sandwarrior
Per @packratt 's suggestion it might be Belgian or Dutch:


I think it looks more like the Dutch M1895 Infantry, which did have hooked guards before around 1900. It's not identical to the one you're looking for but I reckon it's related.
 
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sandwarrior

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I don't think it's Japanese. Pommel doesn't seem to match up, and the oblong piece in the pommel is no guarantee of Japanese origin anyway. Almost looks like some of the Mannlicher bayonets but the pommel's a bit too flat for the ones I've seen.
After searching a while, I came to some close matches. The "knife" part matches a Enfield Lee Metford 1888 Mk 1 Type 2. That did not have a matching hilt with quillon though. later 1907's more closely matched the quillon on the hilt. But of course, the "knife" part of those was distinctly different.

I am assuming this might be some kind of "off" manufacture for a group, i.e. engineers, cavalry, some other specialty? Who knows.
 

sandwarrior

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I used to think a cib,cmb,cab were cool.......

Until I realised basically everyone got one wether they were in the shit or not lol. I dunno how it was before oef oif but they are a participation award for most people now.

I was in a line platoon. Only platoon to see action in our battalion first 4 months of the tour. Battalion had us head to the big fob one day to ressuply and all these pogs at the fob had been given orders for their badges because one single rocket hit "near" the fob...

In the meantime we were eating indirect fire on the reg at our outpost up river and playing dismounted/mounted ied chicken with the talib bois along with our personal favorite, who can expend the most mg ammo in the shortest amount of time across the village square on Fridays. We were doing a great job making sure nobody on our side died while we remodeled the local house we took over unsure of exactly WTF command was trying to have us accomplish but the breezeway and reading nook that housed one of the crewserves was quiet lovely in the early morning late evening after construction was done. Gorgeous views but I digress....

When the big col finally paid us a trip out to see how we dirty boys were living and gave us our cabs, he gave us some words of wisdom about ranger school when he went through in 83' along with a reminder to shave and keep those damn sleeves rolled down and our boots bloused or else...I just tossed that shit in the bottom of a duffle like....gee thanks sport but did you guys bring us some ripit's to restock the caffeine supply cuz I don't mind not having food on the reg but it's going to be a bruhaha if your psd detail try to drink our stash homie it's all we have
I didn't know whether to laugh (cuz it's true) or just like this post.

I found something interesting on this. This guy, Brian Siddall, has started a website doing research on individuals because his uncle was a paratrooper in Normandy and was killed.

Anyhow, he comes across Basil Plumley. For those of you who don't know, he was Ltc. Hal Moore's CSM during the battle of Ia Drang. "We Were Young and Soldiers Once..." He goes off on Plumley as a stolen valor guy. He has him posted on the front page of his website as "LIAR" posted across his picture. His research prompted the Army to review his records. The Army said there were some discrepancies, but not the kind that would make the Army correct CSM Plumley's headstone.

In any case, what this guy says is Plumley was an FA in WWII so not elidgible for the CIB. My understanding is Plumley joined before the CIB was approved and having graduated basic (before the award was basically an infantryman until such time as the Army put him in a different MOS) Having that background, he WAS entitled to the CIB. He did not jump into Normandy through, he went in on a glider. Same on Market Garden and was wounded. (that also qualifies if having an infantry background).

Siddall states he can find no evidence Plumley went to Korea during the conflict. I don't have any research to say yeah or nay. I do know he was in the battle of Ia Drang and help lead the men of 1/7 CAV through one of the nastiest firefights in American history. My question here is that while his father and uncle served, who the fuck is this guy to go throwing shade on everyone. He never served. AAAANNND, how come he has access to peoples military records? I thought those were supposed to remain confidential. He claims on his website he got information on people through the FOIA.

Anybody?
 
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jrassy

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You may want to check his DD214 to make sure he was awarded a CIB. I am ignorant on how they were awarded in Korea, but in current conflicts you had to be an 11 series qualified holding a 11 series on a UMR and been in combat action to receive the CIB. I had some damn good FO's in my platoon but they were not awarded CIBs because they were 12 series and were instead awarded the CAB (combat action badge) .

Like Foul Mike said the CIB is the only award I really give a shit about besides my blue cord and jump wings. I could care less for all the pretty colored ribbons that you accumulate in 24+ years of service.
He had one, I have his DD214 in my possession. He had it and his other medals on a piece of black fabric.
 
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Son of Dorn

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After searching a while, I came to some close matches. The "knife" part matches a Enfield Lee Metford 1888 Mk 1 Type 2. That did not have a matching hilt with quillon though. later 1907's more closely matched the quillon on the hilt. But of course, the "knife" part of those was distinctly different.

I am assuming this might be some kind of "off" manufacture for a group, i.e. engineers, cavalry, some other specialty? Who knows.
Y'know, I thought for a bit that it MIGHT be for a Ross rifle, but the lozenge-shape in the pommel didn't match up right plus there was no hooked quillon on those. Or that it might be an Indian version of a British-manufacture but I didn't see one that matches, either. But I think it's either an "off" as you suggest or one a soldier had modified for some reason, until someone comes along with a more positive ID on it.
 
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sirhrmechanic

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Y'know, I thought for a bit that it MIGHT be for a Ross rifle, but the lozenge-shape in the pommel didn't match up right plus there was no hooked quillon on those. Or that it might be an Indian version of a British-manufacture but I didn't see one that matches, either. But I think it's either an "off" as you suggest or one a soldier had modified for some reason, until someone comes along with a more positive ID on it.
I have a Ross bayonet. That's not one.

After looking some more, I agree not Japanese. I am thinking obscure Belgian or western European. Those folks loved their Bayonets!

As for Basil Plumley above... the glider troops suffered higher casualties than the chute-borne airborne! IMHO, it took a whole lot of cojones to get into a plywood 'plane' being flown by a 'pilot' who was really only trained in dead stick landings under ideal conditions. And fly, in the dark, into a landing zone filled with telephone poles and land mines. Oh and add in a Jeep or a Howitzer or 6 pallets of mortar ammo ready to break loose the instant the glider cracks up on the ground... and I'd far prefer to be on a nice parachute at least being able to watch my own descent.

Glider Infantry were airborne....

1593567648999.png

101st casualties on D-Day. IIRC Glider pilots suffered the highest-percentage casualty rate of any specialty on D-Day. But I could be wrong on that.

I've never done a deep dive on Plumley's history, but one of the men who knew him best, reporter and author Joseph Galloway, thought he was God. Galloway probably deserved a CIB for Ia Drang....

Sirhr
 

sandwarrior

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I have a Ross bayonet. That's not one.

After looking some more, I agree not Japanese. I am thinking obscure Belgian or western European. Those folks loved their Bayonets!

As for Basil Plumley above... the glider troops suffered higher casualties than the chute-borne airborne! IMHO, it took a whole lot of cojones to get into a plywood 'plane' being flown by a 'pilot' who was really only trained in dead stick landings under ideal conditions. And fly, in the dark, into a landing zone filled with telephone poles and land mines. Oh and add in a Jeep or a Howitzer or 6 pallets of mortar ammo ready to break loose the instant the glider cracks up on the ground... and I'd far prefer to be on a nice parachute at least being able to watch my own descent.

Glider Infantry were airborne....

View attachment 7363625

101st casualties on D-Day. IIRC Glider pilots suffered the highest-percentage casualty rate of any specialty on D-Day. But I could be wrong on that.

I've never done a deep dive on Plumley's history, but one of the men who knew him best, reporter and author Joseph Galloway, thought he was God. Galloway probably deserved a CIB for Ia Drang....

Sirhr
Galloway recognized the kind of leader that he was. A no bullshit kind of soldier who KNEW the chips were down and the only way to keep from being overwhelmed was to stay level-headed in the midst of all that was going on. Do what you have to do and let people know where they stand. Leadership top-down and bottom-up. Hal Moore said that without Plumley, they may quite possibly not have made it. Plumley kept Moore calm in some tight situations.

So, for whatever reason Siddall decided to go after Plumley, he can stick it in his ass. I'll take Plumley eight times out of seven any day. I damn sure won't take a puke who never went there, did that, but sniped peoples back anyways.
 
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Son of Dorn

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Galloway recognized the kind of leader that he was. A no bullshit kind of soldier who KNEW the chips were down and the only way to keep from being overwhelmed was to stay level-headed in the midst of all that was going on. Do what you have to do and let people know where they stand. Leadership top-down and bottom-up. Hal Moore said that without Plumley, they may quite possibly not have made it. Plumley kept Moore calm in some tight situations.

So, for whatever reason Siddall decided to go after Plumley, he can stick it in his ass. I'll take Plumley eight times out of seven any day. I damn sure won't take a puke who never went there, did that, but sniped peoples back anyways.
All I know is that the bottom-most section on this page reeks of this Siddall guy being exceptionally butthurt over people still respecting and admiring Plumley no matter how much shit he tried to sling on the man after his death. I don't know jack shit about what Plumley did or didn't do back then because I wasn't there, so I don't see how Siddall knows any better than I do. Maybe Siddall's info is correct after all. Maybe Plumley really was wearing medals and awards and whatever else he wasn't supposed to. Doesn't mean Siddall has to be a complete berk over it.
 

Son of Dorn

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What was this month-long British-backed attempt to invade Republican France, and what naval battle took place in the same region 36 years prior?

And for a bonus, what work of fiction dramatized said invasion attempt?
 

Son of Dorn

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What was possibly the worst military disaster caused by a malfunctioning toilet?

sirhr
Was it the U-1206 incident?
 
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sirhrmechanic

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What was this month-long British-backed attempt to invade Republican France, and what naval battle took place in the same region 36 years prior?

And for a bonus, what work of fiction dramatized said invasion attempt?
I read that as a Kid. The Quebiron expedition and it was in a Horatio Hornblower novel. Lobsters and blue coats or something like that.

Sirhr
 
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Son of Dorn

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I read that as a Kid. The Quebiron expedition and it was in a Horatio Hornblower novel. Lobsters and blue coats or something like that.

Sirhr
Quiberon Expedition, it was. And yes, it was in Mr. Midshipman Hornblower and its TV adaptation The Frogs and the Lobsters/The Wrong War.
 
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Son of Dorn

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In WW1, the French developed this early aircraft warning system and deployed it in the Eiffel Tower. What was it based on?

Cheers, Sirhr
My first thought was something to do with radio jamming but that was developed by pretty much everyone at the time, not the French specifically.