pillar bedding.

supercorndogs

Ham Fisted Gorilla
Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 17, 2014
8,298
8,699
Colorado
I know gorilla glue is good for your hair, but is it ok to glue in pillars with?

1617506932966.png


I am Waiting for some Devcon so I can bed it.
 

KnowNothing256

Supporter
Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
Jan 9, 2020
719
430
Ok, so, first off, I’m not a materials engineer, so the advice is worth what you’re paying.

I could speculate that the ground metal gives the epoxy much more resistance to shattering (which I’m confident it does), but the reality is that a) That shit is rock solid on everything I’ve used it on, with no perceptible shrinkage, and b) Many folks who bed are perfectly happy with it.

Not ever have I seen Gorilla Glue recommended, and at least for me, that silence is telling.

And JB Weld really is cheap, I’m nearing the end of my first pair of tubes after two years of various low-stakes bedding activities and will cheerfully buy again.

Don’t get me wrong, I turn to the Devcon for full action/pillar beds, but JB Weld is fine for stuff that doesn’t have to be dimensionally perfect across a 2” span (minor percentage of expansion/contraction isn’t so minor at that scale).
 

spife7980

Luchador
Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 10, 2017
10,191
9,444
Central TX
Jb weld is a solid material.
Gorilla glue that I’ve seen is all sorta foamy almost when it dries, like it’s got lots of air in it like a denser expanding foam. But they have so many types maybe not the one you’re gonna use.
 
Last edited:

supercorndogs

Ham Fisted Gorilla
Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 17, 2014
8,298
8,699
Colorado
Jb weld is a solid material.
Gorilla glue that I’ve seen is all sorta foamy almost when it dries, like it’s got lots of air in it like a fed set expanding foam. But they have so many types maybe not the one you’re gonna use.
It is the original formula pictured. The foam is what comes out of the joint, because what is inside expands as it dries. That seems good when gluing in pillars.
 

KnowNothing256

Supporter
Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
Jan 9, 2020
719
430
It is the original formula pictured. The foam is what comes out of the joint, because what is inside expands as it dries. That seems good when gluing in pillars.
Oh! Yeah, no, not good. You’ll have a hard time getting a good, clean, flush trim on the foam without marring the stock, and it’ll look a mess even if you do get it flush. JB Weld won’t grow, it’ll just flow a bit if you put in on too soon; wait 30-45 mins and it gets pretty manageable.

But, I just processed that you’re talking about putting pillars in before doing a full bed job. I’d recommend doing them at the same time; there’s a guy that actually sells a DVD that shows his whole process for $38 and that’s how he does it and how I learned. He does a lot extra that I don’t, but you can pick and choose which steps you want and don’t. I have the DVD, if you don’t want to spend that money (super worth it IMO if you’re gonna bed more than one gun) I can loan it to you in about a week and a half. Tons of great info, delivered in a very dry, droll Southern accent. Highly recommend.

 

celltech

Sergeant of the Hide
Full Member
Minuteman
Jan 9, 2019
426
413
IMHO Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane based adhesive more suited for direct contact material bonding. It won't have anywhere near the compressive strength of epoxy. Are your pillars slightly floating in the stock holes, or are they an interference fit? The ploy Gorilla glue will remain somewhat flexible and let the pillars float around. If you already have Devcon coming then just use it...
 

supercorndogs

Ham Fisted Gorilla
Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 17, 2014
8,298
8,699
Colorado
They fit nice and tight, just like the instructions on the GG call for. I don't think it will flex after the glue expands and cures. I think it will lock the pillars in place. I could be wrong. Last time I did it, I was gluing a pillar back in. So I only used it on one pillar. Then bedded. But I shot it quite a bit and the bedding never cracked or anything around that pillar. It seems to me like the pillars don't take very much stress.

Now I am kind of interest to glue some bolts in some holes in a board, and see if there is an appreciable difference. I would guess if the hole is tight, the GG will work better, and if the hole is loose the epoxy will work better.

I like to work from the bottom up on M5 bottom metals, that way I can set the metal even with the stock in inlet from the get go. Hopefully this DBM is ok. It appears like the guy who had it was shooting it with no pillars installed. Just the giant gaping holes, and the action screws appear to have been tightened so tight, it bubbled the the DBM under the action screw and forged threads into the hole. I had to drill them out and file it flat.
 

Cascade Hemi

Major Hide Member
Full Member
Minuteman
Feb 9, 2019
1,185
956
PNW
If you're just securing the pillars in the stock prior to bedding then GG is probably fine. Just make sure there is some kind of mechanical lock cut into the pillars and the stock.
 

FisherT&C

Barrel Work for Bolt Actions
Supporter
Commercial Supporter
Full Member
Minuteman
  • Jan 1, 2020
    370
    223
    Montana
    Gorilla glue expands and moves stuff around. A 5 minute epoxy is sufficient for holding pillars in place. Once the Devcon sets up there is nothing to worry about.
     

    10X Rifles

    PO 1
    Minuteman
    Apr 26, 2012
    81
    36
    67
    Colorado
    Why glue them in place. leave them loose and bed the rifle. They will never move after that. and might be straigther in the stock.
     

    supercorndogs

    Ham Fisted Gorilla
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 17, 2014
    8,298
    8,699
    Colorado
    I preferred the idea of gluing them in and doing the pillars alone. So I could set the DBM flush in the stock with the pillars.
     

    Attachments

    • IMG_0786.JPG
      IMG_0786.JPG
      488.5 KB · Views: 19

    jbell

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Jan 16, 2010
    5,879
    2,895
    43
    Lewiston, ME
    Agreed I do pillars first. But why not Marine Tex gray as opposed to JB or any kind of epoxy / glue. You can source it from most boating supply stores.
     
    • Like
    Reactions: Aftermath

    supercorndogs

    Ham Fisted Gorilla
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 17, 2014
    8,298
    8,699
    Colorado
    I used the Devcon 10110 for bedding because I can get it in the single serving sized tubes. I don't like how runny it is, but I do like the smooth surface finish when its done.

    I don't think there are any boating supply stores around here. I almost ordered marine tex on accident thinking i used it last time instead of Devcon. Is it a little thicker than Devcon? I have not tried marine tex but it seems to be one of the big 2 that gets recommend a lot.
     
    • Like
    Reactions: jbell

    Threadcutter308

    Outlier
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 13, 2017
    9,587
    17,086
    Camano Island, Washington
    I used the Devcon 10110 for bedding because I can get it in the single serving sized tubes. I don't like how runny it is, but I do like the smooth surface finish when its done.

    I don't think there are any boating supply stores around here. I almost ordered marine tex on accident thinking i used it last time instead of Devcon. Is it a little thicker than Devcon? I have not tried marine tex but it seems to be one of the big 2 that gets recommend a lot.
    I've used both Devcon and Marine Tex and the results were both good. I might have a slight bias toward Devcon, if for no other reason than it is more expensive (so, it must be better ;)). I'm pretty much using Marine Tex from here on out. Good results, cheaper and good availability.
     

    jbell

    Gunny Sergeant
    Full Member
    Minuteman
  • Jan 16, 2010
    5,879
    2,895
    43
    Lewiston, ME
    I have bedded a lot of actions, bottom metal, scope base with Marine Tex and tested it for years. I also use it to fill in pitting in cooling systems in diesel engines and rebuilt them years later to find the repair still as good as the day I did it. I have tested it for shrinkage, crush / load carrying, solvent resistance and have always been satisfied with the results. Just prep the material properly, mix it correctly, and cure it in the correct temp and your good to go. I like how it's a little thicker (creamy peanut butter) so it's easy to work with. Just pay attention to how you mix it and apply it to prevent air bubbles.
     

    Matt ironwood

    Private
    Minuteman
    Apr 17, 2019
    47
    36
    I know gorilla glue is good for your hair, but is it ok to glue in pillars with?

    View attachment 7597116

    I am Waiting for some Devcon so I can bed it.
    Its been a while, and ive forgotten a bit so forgive me if something is off.

    when i used to work with gorilla glue, wed only use it on damp wood. not furniture grade with only 8-12% moisture. i believe gg was a polyurethane glue. The ooze out of the joints, material was pourus, and actually held water moisture in our out door furniture. It also crushes easily when it is old. It worked ok for our uses. But id never let it near a firearm for ant reason.

    i just cant see how this could be possibly be the results you desire.
     

    supercorndogs

    Ham Fisted Gorilla
    Full Member
    Minuteman
    Feb 17, 2014
    8,298
    8,699
    Colorado
    GG works great on split wood stocks. Pour into crack, let it run in, clamp it shut.

    Desired results.....check. Runs like soup through a sick cat. Thanks for your concern.(y):ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:
     

    Attachments

    • IMG_0788.JPG
      IMG_0788.JPG
      358.9 KB · Views: 23
    • IMG_0789.JPG
      IMG_0789.JPG
      508.1 KB · Views: 22
    • IMG_0790.JPG
      IMG_0790.JPG
      534.9 KB · Views: 22